Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Ford and His Republicanism Perished Together

  1. #1
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    298
    Post Thanks / Like

    Ford and His Republicanism Perished Together

    Ford and his Republicanism perished together
    It was an intimation of Gerald Ford's own mortality that less than two months before he died, his brand of Republicanism was virtually extinguished at the polls.

    Indeed, a day after the former president's burial in his home state of Michigan, the new Congress - one that would be sadly unfamiliar to him - will be sworn in. Moderate Republicans, after all, saw their numbers shrink to insignificance in the November elections.

    From New England, where such GOP centrists as Reps. Nancy Johnson and Rob Simmons and Sen. Lincoln Chafee were made to suffer for the sins of their party, to the Midwest, where the estimable Rep. Jim Leach was unseated, the voters unleashed their indiscriminate wrath. The effect of the wholesale banishment of the kind of Republicans with whom Ford would have been comfortable will, by the process of subtraction, make the GOP ranks in Congress even more conservative than they were before the elections.

    Make no mistake about it, Ford was no liberal, but his very presence in Congress for the quarter century before his elevation to the vice presidency and presidency was the result of his challenge, in the 1948 Republican primary, to a reactionary isolationist named Bartel J. Jonkman. Ford had come to embrace the idea of a bipartisan foreign policy.

    When did this tribe of Gerald Ford Republicans begin to disappear? The first blow came in 1980 with the election of Ronald Reagan, and the effects were felt most acutely in the Senate when a number of conservative GOP House members were elected to the upper chamber.

    But the most destructive blow came with the elevation in 1994 of Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia to a position of leadership. Gingrich poisoned the wells in the House by undermining GOP moderates and attacking Democrats, causing Minority Leader Bob Michel to retire in disgust. Michel recalled later for historian Robert Remini that he "didn't have to step on peoples' toes. My normal inclination was always to talk to the other side."

    Talking to the other side became a rarer and rarer conversation in the House in the '90s, and although moderates continued to have value for maintaining the GOP majority, their influence was greatly reduced under the leadership of Tom DeLay, who delighted in stepping on people's toes.

    The final indignity for the remnants of the Ford Republicans came with the recent congressional elections, which made the few remaining moderates no more than a trace element in their party.

    [url]http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/200...rishedtogether[/url]

  2. #2
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    37,772
    Post Thanks / Like
    So partisanship is a purely Conservative thing?

  3. #3
    flushingjet
    Guest
    [QUOTE=YellowSubmarine]Ford and his Republicanism perished together
    It was an intimation of Gerald Ford's own mortality that less than two months before he died, his brand of Republicanism was virtually extinguished at the polls.

    Indeed, a day after the former president's burial in his home state of Michigan, the new Congress - one that would be sadly unfamiliar to him - will be sworn in. Moderate Republicans, after all, saw their numbers shrink to insignificance in the November elections.

    From New England, where such GOP centrists as Reps. Nancy Johnson and Rob Simmons and Sen. Lincoln Chafee were made to suffer for the sins of their party, to the Midwest, where the estimable Rep. Jim Leach was unseated, the voters unleashed their indiscriminate wrath. The effect of the wholesale banishment of the kind of Republicans with whom Ford would have been comfortable will, by the process of subtraction, make the GOP ranks in Congress even more conservative than they were before the elections.

    Make no mistake about it, Ford was no liberal, but his very presence in Congress for the quarter century before his elevation to the vice presidency and presidency was the result of his challenge, in the 1948 Republican primary, to a reactionary isolationist named Bartel J. Jonkman. Ford had come to embrace the idea of a bipartisan foreign policy.

    When did this tribe of Gerald Ford Republicans begin to disappear? The first blow came in 1980 with the election of Ronald Reagan, and the effects were felt most acutely in the Senate when a number of conservative GOP House members were elected to the upper chamber.

    But the most destructive blow came with the elevation in 1994 of Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia to a position of leadership. Gingrich poisoned the wells in the House by undermining GOP moderates and attacking Democrats, causing Minority Leader Bob Michel to retire in disgust. Michel recalled later for historian Robert Remini that he "didn't have to step on peoples' toes. My normal inclination was always to talk to the other side."

    Talking to the other side became a rarer and rarer conversation in the House in the '90s, and although moderates continued to have value for maintaining the GOP majority, their influence was greatly reduced under the leadership of Tom DeLay, who delighted in stepping on people's toes.

    The final indignity for the remnants of the Ford Republicans came with the recent congressional elections, which made the few remaining moderates no more than a trace element in their party.

    [url="http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/200...rishedtogether"]http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/200...rishedtogether[/url][/QUOTE]

    Lincoln Chafee is/was no GOP Centrist, DUMBmarine.

    Typical lib fantasy, respect for GOP members who prefer when they are
    backbenchers/losers

    Just like the dysfunctional cultures that libs love that
    have the women subserviently walking behind men

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us