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Thread: Obama Is In - from his website

  1. #1
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    Obama Is In - from his website

    As many of you know, over the last few months I have been thinking hard about my plans for 2008. Running for the presidency is a profound decision - a decision no one should make on the basis of media hype or personal ambition alone - and so before I committed myself and my family to this race, I wanted to be sure that this was right for us and, more importantly, right for the country.
    I certainly didn't expect to find myself in this position a year ago. But as I've spoken to many of you in my travels across the states these past months; as I've read your emails and read your letters; I've been struck by how hungry we all are for a different kind of politics.

    So I've spent some time thinking about how I could best advance the cause of change and progress that we so desperately need.

    The decisions that have been made in Washington these past six years, and the problems that have been ignored, have put our country in a precarious place. Our economy is changing rapidly, and that means profound changes for working people. Many of you have shared with me your stories about skyrocketing health care bills, the pensions you've lost and your struggles to pay for college for your kids. Our continued dependence on oil has put our security and our very planet at risk. And we're still mired in a tragic and costly war that should have never been waged.

    But challenging as they are, it's not the magnitude of our problems that concerns me the most. It's the smallness of our politics. America's faced big problems before. But today, our leaders in Washington seem incapable of working together in a practical, common sense way. Politics has become so bitter and partisan, so gummed up by money and influence, that we can't tackle the big problems that demand solutions.

    And that's what we have to change first.

    We have to change our politics, and come together around our common interests and concerns as Americans.

    This won't happen by itself. A change in our politics can only come from you; from people across our country who believe there's a better way and are willing to work for it.

    Years ago, as a community organizer in Chicago, I learned that meaningful change always begins at the grassroots, and that engaged citizens working together can accomplish extraordinary things.

    So even in the midst of the enormous challenges we face today, I have great faith and hope about the future - because I believe in you.

    And that's why I wanted to tell you first that I'll be filing papers today to create a presidential exploratory committee. For the next several weeks, I am going to talk with people from around the country, listening and learning more about the challenges we face as a nation, the opportunities that lie before us, and the role that a presidential campaign might play in bringing our country together. And on February 10th, at the end of these decisions and in my home state of Illinois, I'll share my plans with my friends, neighbors and fellow Americans.

    In the meantime, I want to thank all of you for your time, your suggestions, your encouragement and your prayers. And I look forward to continuing our conversation in the weeks and months to come.

  2. #2
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    He's got a snowball's chance in hell....

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=DeanPatsFan]He's got a snowball's chance in hell....[/QUOTE]

    So did the democrats in '04. Remember what happened in '06? 35-0.

    Keep thinking like yesterday......

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    What is so special about him anyway?

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]What is so special about him anyway?[/QUOTE]

    He is not republican and he did not vote for the war

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]He is not republican and he did not vote for the war[/QUOTE]
    Then why aren't you running for President?

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    obama has rockstar level charisma

    he's the one i hope runs, cause he's got a real shot to win

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]He is not republican and he did not vote for the war[/QUOTE]


    there's an unbiased opinion from a self proclaimed well reasearched poster who claims he is an "independent".... :rolleyes:


    it'll be interesting to see how the liberal media covers, or if they cover it at all, hussien obama's endorsement of live birth abortions which is the equivlant of infant killing....

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    [QUOTE=sackdance]Then why aren't you running for President?[/QUOTE]
    LMFAO!!!:rotfl:

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]He is not republican and he did not vote for the war[/QUOTE]


    Why Martin Luther King Was Republican
    by Frances Rice
    Posted Aug 16, 2006

    It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans. Why? From its founding in 1854 as the anti-slavery party until today, the Republican Party has championed freedom and civil rights for blacks. And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: slavery, secession, segregation and now socialism.

    It was the Democrats who fought to keep blacks in slavery and passed the discriminatory Black Codes and Jim Crow laws. The Democrats started the Ku Klux Klan to lynch and terrorize blacks. The Democrats fought to prevent the passage of every civil rights law beginning with the civil rights laws of the 1860s, and continuing with the civil rights laws of the 1950s and 1960s.

    During the civil rights era of the 1960s, Dr. King was fighting the Democrats who stood in the school house doors, turned skin-burning fire hoses on blacks and let loose vicious dogs. It was Republican President Dwight Eisenhower who pushed to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and sent troops to Arkansas to desegregate schools. President Eisenhower also appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren to the U.S. Supreme Court, which resulted in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision ending school segregation. Much is made of Democrat President Harry Truman's issuing an Executive Order in 1948 to desegregate the military. Not mentioned is the fact that it was Eisenhower who actually took action to effectively end segregation in the military.

    Democrat President John F. Kennedy is lauded as a proponent of civil rights. However, Kennedy voted against the 1957 Civil Rights Act while he was a senator, as did Democrat Sen. Al Gore Sr. And after he became President, Kennedy was opposed to the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. King that was organized by A. Phillip Randolph, who was a black Republican. President Kennedy, through his brother Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy, had Dr. King wiretapped and investigated by the FBI on suspicion of being a Communist in order to undermine Dr. King.

    In March of 1968, while referring to Dr. King's leaving Memphis, Tenn., after riots broke out where a teenager was killed, Democrat Sen. Robert Byrd (W.Va.), a former member of the Ku Klux Klan, called Dr. King a "trouble-maker" who starts trouble, but runs like a coward after trouble is ignited. A few weeks later, Dr. King returned to Memphis and was assassinated on April 4, 1968.

    Given the circumstances of that era, it is understandable why Dr. King was a Republican. It was the Republicans who fought to free blacks from slavery and amended the Constitution to grant blacks freedom (13th Amendment), citizenship (14th Amendment) and the right to vote (15th Amendment). Republicans passed the civil rights laws of the 1860s, including the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 that was designed to establish a new government system in the Democrat-controlled South, one that was fair to blacks. Republicans also started the NAACP and affirmative action with Republican President Richard Nixon's 1969 Philadelphia Plan (crafted by black Republican Art Fletcher) that set the nation's fist goals and timetables. Although affirmative action now has been turned by the Democrats into an unfair quota system, affirmative action was begun by Nixon to counter the harm caused to blacks when Democrat President Woodrow Wilson in 1912 kicked all of the blacks out of federal government jobs.

    Few black Americans know that it was Republicans who founded the Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Unknown also is the fact that Republican Sen. Everett Dirksen from Illinois was key to the passage of civil rights legislation in 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965. Not mentioned in recent media stories about extension of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is the fact that Dirksen wrote the language for the bill. Dirksen also crafted the language for the Civil Rights Act of 1968 which prohibited discrimination in housing. President Lyndon Johnson could not have achieved passage of civil rights legislation without the support of Republicans.

    Critics of Republican Sen. Barry Goldwater, who ran for President against Johnson in 1964, ignore the fact that Goldwater wanted to force the Democrats in the South to stop passing discriminatory laws and thus end the need to continuously enact federal civil rights legislation.

    Those who wrongly criticize Goldwater also ignore the fact that Johnson, in his 4,500 State of the Union Address delivered on Jan. 4, 1965, mentioned scores of topics for federal action, but only 35 words were devoted to civil rights. He did not mention one word about voting rights. Then in 1967, showing his anger with Dr. King's protest against the Vietnam War, Johnson referred to Dr. King as "that Nigger preacher."

    Contrary to the false assertions by Democrats, the racist "Dixiecrats" did not all migrate to the Republican Party. "Dixiecrats" declared that they would rather vote for a "yellow dog" than vote for a Republican because the Republican Party was know as the party for blacks. Today, some of those "Dixiecrats" continue their political careers as Democrats, including Robert Byrd, who is well known for having been a "Keagle" in the Ku Klux Klan.

    townhall:
    [url]http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=16500[/url]

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=bill parcells]LMFAO!!!:rotfl:[/QUOTE]

    Why is it that republican posters on this board cannot do their own diligence?

    Make your own opinions of people.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=sackdance]Then why aren't you running for President?[/QUOTE]

    It has crossed my mind. The money is not good enough and thanks to the republicans, ethics has gone out of the window. I want to keep mine intact.

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]Why is it that republican posters on this board cannot do their own diligence?

    Make your own opinions of people.[/QUOTE]

    a classic and ignorant response from a leftist who, when asked what's so special about hussien obama, the first reaction is:

    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg][B]He is not republican [/B] and he did not vote for the war[/QUOTE]

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    [B][I]In the aftermath of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Lyndon B. Johnson was forced to respond to the escalating demands of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement for major civil rights reforms. Johnson and King engaged in a series of negotiations that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, but this spirit of cooperation was irrevocably damaged in 1967 when King made his public statement against the War in Vietnam.

    Born in Stonewall, Texas, on 27 August 1908, Johnson was the first child of Sam Ealy Johnson, Jr. and Rebekah Baines Johnson. He graduated with a B.S. from Southwest Texas State Teachers College in 1930. On 17 November 1934, Johnson married Claudia Alta Taylor, “Lady Bird” as she was known to friends. Three years later, he won a seat in the House of Representatives. In 1948 he was elected to the U.S. Senate.

    On 22 November 1963, Lyndon B. Johnson became the 36th president of the United States following the assassination of John F. Kennedy. In an address before a joint session of Congress on 27 November, Johnson pledged support for President Kennedy's legislative agenda, which included civil rights and education legislation.

    Under Johnson, two landmark pieces of civil rights legislation were passed: the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed discrimination in public accommodations, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which provided for federal enforcement of voter registration and outlawed literacy tests. King did not give Johnson overwhelming credit for the legislation, stating that these resolutions were "written in the streets" by demonstrators.

    A landmark of Johnson's presidency was the Great Society program. Initiated by Johnson in January 1965, this legislation aimed to alleviate poverty through programs for educational improvements, urban renewal, the development of impoverished areas, and crime prevention. Johnson believed this program would ultimately benefit the black community, but he told King and other civil rights leaders that he would have difficulty passing voting rights legislation. King disagreed and urged Johnson to make voting rights a priority.

    Later that year, in a speech given at Howard University, Johnson restated his commitment to the struggle for civil rights when he outlined a new direction for his administration: "It is not enough to just open the gates of opportunity,” he said. “All our citizens must have the ability to walk through the gates. This is the next and more profound stage of the battle for civil rights. We seek not just freedom but opportunity—not just legal equity but human ability—not just equality as a right and a theory, but equality as a fact and as a result."

    At the same time Johnson was charting new policies for civil rights domestically, his administration was overseeing a continuing escalation in Vietnam. In a move that drew criticism from both outside and inside the civil rights movement, King openly criticized the Johnson administration's policy toward Vietnam and called for an end to the military campaign in a speech delivered on 4 April 1967. "There may be others who want to go another way, but when I took up the cross, I recognized its meaning," King explained. "The cross may mean the death of your popularity. It may mean the death of your bridge to the White House . . . but take up your cross and just bear it." Already facing increasing protest against the Vietnam War, the Johnson Administration was infuriated by King's public criticism; and the already existing efforts by F.B.I. Director, J. Edgar Hoover, to destroy King were intensified.

    On 31 March 1968, Johnson announced that he would not seek re-election for another term as president. In 1969, in his final press conference as president, Johnson cited passage of the Voting Rights Act as his greatest accomplishment. Johnson died of a heart attack at his Texas ranch on 22 January 1973.








    Sources


    Clayborne Carson, ed., Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. (New York: Warner Books, 1998)

    Nick Kotz, Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the laws that changed America. ( New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2005)

    Lyndon Johnson, "To Fulfill These Rights," Howard University, 4 June 1965

    The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum: [url]http://www.lbjlib.utexas.edu/[/url]. [/I] [/B]

    [url]http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/about_king/encyclopedia/johnson_lyndon.htm[/url]

    These are the reasons why Most African Americans vote democrat today.
    I almost equate Ms. Rice to Michelle Malkin. Ms. Rice did serve in the Army. Only the republicans pay her any attention.

    She gets very little attention in the Afrcian American community. Her views are very simplistic and the community sees it vividly. There were some commercials run in Atlanta/Chicago during the recent elections leaning to these claims. We can see how much good they did for the republicans.

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY]there's an unbiased opinion from a self proclaimed well reasearched poster who claims he is an "independent".... :rolleyes:


    it'll be interesting to see how the liberal media covers, or if they cover it at all, [B]hussien[/B] obama's endorsement of live birth abortions which is the equivlant of infant killing....[/QUOTE]

    We see that the 'republican hate media engine" is in full swing.....GWB's wrongful war has killed thousands.

    It looks like you profess to kill them when they are here, not before they are here.

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]We see that the 'republican hate media engine" is in full swing.....GWB's wrongful war has killed thousands.

    It looks like you profess to kill them when they are here, not before they are here.[/QUOTE]


    as opposed to well researched "independent" like yourself who backs someone like Hussien Obama who has no problem killing infants before they get here or afterwards????

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    So you would vote for him because he is anti-war. Anything else?

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]So you would vote for him because he is anti-war. Anything else?[/QUOTE]


    couldn't you see the answer above from this self-proclaimed independent who states he's well researched...he will vote for him because he's not a Republican...

    that's as ignorant as saying any black kid who drives a car worth more than $30K must be dealing drugs...

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY]as opposed to well researched "independent" like yourself who backs someone like Hussien Obama who has no problem killing infants before they get here or afterwards????[/QUOTE]

    I have stated several times that I am anti abortion. The wrongful, shameful and hateful war in Iraq is the major topic of the day. Abortion has to take a back seat for now.

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]So you would vote for him because he is anti-war. Anything else?[/QUOTE]

    His intelligence

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