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Thread: Imus' words any worse than Jackson's?

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    Imus' words any worse than Jackson's?

    [QUOTE][B]Kathleen Parker: Imus' words any worse than Jackson's?
    By KATHLEEN PARKER[/B]

    8 hours, 46 minutes ago

    I'm a Don Imus fan and often tune in for headlines, a shot of guyness and a pinch of politics. He's sometimes funny, sometimes smart, and every now and then, dumber'n a box o' rocks.

    As recently, when he referred to the Rutgers University women's basketball team as "nappy-headed hos." It was ridiculously unacceptable, mean and insensitive.

    But was it unforgivable?

    Piling on is awfully fashionable at the moment, and while tempting, it's also awfully easy. Let's try something hard. Like thinking.

    The offensive remark was meant to be funny on a show that is a mix of serious and humorous commentary, both irreverent and sometimes adolescent. We all can agree it wasn't funny. As Imus has acknowledged during his stations of the cross, it was "repugnant, repulsive and horrible."

    It was also racist.

    But the public scourging of Don Imus -- and his "I'm a good person who said a bad thing" mea culpa -- borders on the ridiculous. Most absurd was his lashing by Al Sharpton on the latter's radio show.

    Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and others have called for the I-Man's' firing. A two-week suspension isn't enough, according to these self-appointed arbiters of acceptable speech, who seem to have made peace with their own racist remarks of the past.

    In 1995, Sharpton organized a protest and called a Jewish landlord a "white interloper" after the man terminated the lease on a black-owned music store. Later, the landlord's own store was burned to the ground, and eight people were killed.

    Jackson called New York City "Hymietown" and Jews "hymies" in a 1984 interview with The Washington Post. When accused of anti-Semitism, he said, "Charge it to my head ... not to my heart."

    Fair enough for Jackson, but not for Imus?

    What Imus said was not hateful, but it was thoughtlessly unkind to young women who are not, in fact, "hos."

    Anyone who caught the student-athletes' Tuesday news conference couldn't help being impressed by the players' maturity, integrity and poise -- and feel a little bit sorry for the less-mature Imus. His chastening has been severe and his humiliation must be painful.

    The strength of the country's reaction may suggest that our tolerance for gratuitous insult has reached a tipping point -- and that is a welcome development. What would be even more welcome is if that news were to reach the places where the word "ho," short for "can't-be-printed-here," is frequently used.

    Black hip-hop artists have been denigrating the women of their families and neighborhoods for years with terminology that reduces all women to receptacles for men's pleasure. Sharpton and Jackson would do well to direct some of their outrage to that neck of the woods.

    Meanwhile, the broader savaging of Imus seems disproportionate to the crime. There is in the air the unmistakable scent of schadenfreude -- pleasure in someone else's misery -- as some in the media have turned on the radio jock like pack wolves on a wounded puppy.

    Otherwise, his takedown feels like hecklers gone wild. When the star is down, the heckler gets to be the star. Celebrity comes to the one with the loudest voice, the meanest jibe or, in this case, the pithiest piety.

    In such an environment, punishment doesn't have to be equal to the sin; it has to be equal to the sinner. Because Imus is rich and powerful, the only appropriate punishment is death by a million apologies.

    Followed by forced retirement.

    Context has been ignored, meanwhile, by all but Imus' oldest friends. Imus has said a few dumb things in a decades-long career -- as have we all -- but he also has raised many millions for charities.

    Otherwise, his show is entertaining and informative, thanks to the many national politicians who show up. Yes, it's a little clubby at times, mutually admiring and self-absorbed, but those characteristics also create a sense of relaxed intimacy that is part of the show's attraction.

    Whatever his flaws -- and however careless his recent blurt -- Imus deserves a shot at resurrection.

    He has promised to make a better show and to become an even better person. If that means no more racist jokes, the world will be better. It would be a waste, however, to banish a reformed Imus from the airwaves -- especially if an example of redemption and rehabilitation is what we seek.

    But sainthood -- please -- is not required. In fact, a St. Imus would be a suicide bomb for sure.[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Kathleen+Parker%3a+Imus%27+words+any+worse+than+Jackson%27s%3f&articleId=0f617ceb-83cb-4d1d-a4b9-fd2dcd7d1341[/url]

    ----------------

    Like I inferred yesterday....bad things can happen if you stray from offending white people, Italians, Poles or Jews.....

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    Bravo! Shapton and Jackson are both racist who use their own people for political and monetary gain.

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    so let me get this straight - Imus is fine because Jackson called NY Jimetown over 20 years ago?

    times change gentlemen Imus was being racist back in 1984 as well, but it was before PC. you can't do that stuff anymore.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]so let me get this straight - Imus is fine because Jackson called NY Jimetown over 20 years ago?

    times change gentlemen Imus was being racist back in 1984 as well, but it was before PC. you can't do that stuff anymore.[/QUOTE]

    The reason you can't do that stuff anymore is because a handful of activist leaders will intimidate a handful of advertisers and that will pull the plug. What's next you go after Rush because he has a different view on global warming?

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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs]The reason you can't do that stuff anymore is because a handful of activist leaders will intimidate a handful of advertisers and that will pull the plug. What's next you go after Rush because he has a different view on global warming?[/QUOTE]

    Yeah im sure the Rutgers Womens basketball team were just fine with it. It was all the activists trumping up indignation. Maybe they liked being called nappy headed ho's.

    let's face facts, Imus is a relic, the world has moved on without him and this is his just deserts. It's not illegal to be a racist in the comfort of your own home but no one in the mainstream media is going to guaruntee your employment - not anymore.

    there used to be a time (about 70 years ago, not too far back) when Al Jolsen performed in blackface... maybe we should bring that back too huh?


    [IMG]http://www.musicals101.com/News/jolson.jpg[/IMG]

    damn activists taking away all the rights of white people to act like a$$holes
    Last edited by bitonti; 04-11-2007 at 09:50 AM.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]so let me get this straight - Imus is fine because Jackson called NY Jimetown over 20 years ago?

    times change gentlemen Imus was being racist back in 1984 as well, but it was before PC. you can't do that stuff anymore.[/QUOTE]


    ahh, the simpler days when antisemitism was accepted and enjoyed by the public

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    [QUOTE=pauliec]ahh, the simpler days when antisemitism was accepted and enjoyed by the public[/QUOTE]

    don't forget about afro-bigotry - alot was accepted in 1984 that won't fly now. that's the way it goes.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]don't forget about afro-bigotry - alot was accepted in 1984 that won't fly now. that's the way it goes.[/QUOTE]

    Why aren't they more concerned with the hip hop crap. So long as they make money off of it they could careless. Rap is more denigrating to black women then Imus is.

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]Why aren't they more concerned with the hip hop crap. So long as they make money off of it they could careless. Rap is more denigrating to black women then Imus is.[/QUOTE]

    That's your opinion, and even if it's true two wrongs don't make a right.

  10. #10
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    MnJetfan has a great point. Bit, don't you think some of the lyrics in many popular rap songs go too far? It's a musical culture that celebrates violence and prostitution. Thug-life. Tell me that's not harmful.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]don't forget about afro-bigotry - alot was accepted in 1984 that won't fly now. that's the way it goes.[/QUOTE]


    guess it was accepted in 1995 as well when Sharpton referred to the Jewish store owner as a white interloper....sadly the article does not even touch on the things sharpton did during the central park jogger case which were both racist and sexist....

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    you guys don't get it

    what rap artists do is irrelevant here. you want to have that discussion let's have it - but be aware that's a different discussion altogether, with different context.

    Imus isn't a rap star ok? he's an old white dude. society isn't fair, life isn't fair and one of the rules is that young black people can say stupid s--t and people will understand more than when old white dudes say the same thing. that's the society we live in.

    part of the reason why is that we are no less than three generations removed from billy holiday's strange fruit, black people hung from trees. No one was hanging white dudes like imus from trees, he is held to a higher standard. is that right? probably not but again this is another discussion altogether.

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]Why aren't they more concerned with the hip hop crap. So long as they make money off of it they could careless. Rap is more denigrating to black women then Imus is.[/QUOTE]

    Moreover, there has been an effort to remove this type of language from the hip/hop/rap music genre.

    A few years ago in ATL one of the HBCU's kept Nelly from speaking there because of his 'Tip Drill' video. If there is something good that can come out of this I hope it is that debasing and degrading language specified at people is intolerable and has consequences.

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]Moreover, there has been an effort to remove this type of language from the hip/hop/rap music genre.
    [/QUOTE]

    dawg these guys don't actually listen to or understand rap they are just using it as a debate tactic when it's convenient to them.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]you guys don't get it

    what rap artists do is irrelevant here. you want to have that discussion let's have it - but be aware that's a different discussion altogether, with different context.

    Imus isn't a rap star ok? he's an old white dude. society isn't fair, life isn't fair and one of the rules is that young black people can say stupid s--t and people will understand more than when old white dudes say the same thing. that's the society we live in.

    part of the reason why is that we are no less than three generations removed from billy holiday's strange fruit, black people hung from trees. No one was hanging white dudes like imus from trees, he is held to a higher standard. is that right? probably not but again this is another discussion altogether.[/QUOTE]


    You're right, I don't get it.

    But while we're on the subject, real quick, what are your thoughts about the rap lyrics? Harmful or not?

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]dawg these guys don't actually listen to or understand rap they are just using it as a debate tactic when it's convenient to them.[/QUOTE]


    Yeah, you're right. I'm just a stupid honky. I'm too lame to understand the lowbrow crap that passes for actual hip hop music these days.

    50 Cent, man, he's a real genius.

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]dawg these guys don't actually listen to or understand rap they are just using it as a debate tactic when it's convenient to them.[/QUOTE]

    I find a lot of their talking points like that bit

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]you guys don't get it

    what rap artists do is irrelevant here. you want to have that discussion let's have it - but be aware that's a different discussion altogether, with different context.

    Imus isn't a rap star ok? he's an old white dude. society isn't fair, life isn't fair and one of the rules is that young black people can say stupid s--t and people will understand more than when old white dudes say the same thing. that's the society we live in.

    part of the reason why is that we are no less than three generations removed from billy holiday's strange fruit, black people hung from trees. No one was hanging white dudes like imus from trees, he is held to a higher standard. is that right? probably not but again this is another discussion altogether.[/QUOTE]


    but you prove that you do get it...

    that's why in your simplistic mind you use moral relativism to say the racist commments by jesse jack and the rev, leaders of their community and voices in the dim party, don't matter but the racist comments of a washed up white dj says does matter...classic...

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    [QUOTE=bitonti]Yeah im sure the Rutgers Womens basketball team were just fine with it. It was all the activists trumping up indignation. Maybe they liked being called nappy headed ho's.

    let's face facts, Imus is a relic, the world has moved on without him and this is his just deserts. It's not illegal to be a racist in the comfort of your own home but no one in the mainstream media is going to guaruntee your employment - not anymore.

    there used to be a time (about 70 years ago, not too far back) when Al Jolsen performed in blackface... maybe we should bring that back too huh?


    [IMG]http://www.musicals101.com/News/jolson.jpg[/IMG]

    damn activists taking away all the rights of white people to act like a$$holes[/QUOTE]


    So your point is what that hurt feelings is worth your freedom of speech? Imus may be a relic this won't effect he's ratings enough to take him off the air. What will take him off the air is a handful of advertisers being bullied to take him off the air. What's next? If you offend somebody's political sensibility is that a firing offense? I'm all for public opinion deciding this but it really comes down to the rights of Imus's listeners to decide not Al Sharpton or a girls basketball team that had their feelings hurt.

    The real problem here is the people who will get Imus off the air are not he's listeners, it is those who make their living out of racism. What do you think is going to happen in this country when the majority realizes than can shut people up?

    The Right in this country is using security as their method of suspending habeas Corpus, holding people without trial, illegal wiretapping. The left is using racism and political correctness to suspend free speech and thought. I don't take kindly to tyranny from either side and I especially don't want Al Sharpton, Bitoni or a Rutgers womens basketball team telling me what the standard is for what I can listen to when there is enough band width out there to satisfy, racists, anti-Semites, and every other hater and lover of all persuasions.

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]I find a lot of their talking points like that bit[/QUOTE]


    Alright Jetdawgg, since Bitonti can't explain to me why there's nothing wrong with those rap lyrics, why don't you? Please help me understand why it's cool to have guns and whores and the champagne flowing over every f-bomb in a mainstream rap video.

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