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Thread: Fiscal sanity? Let's hope so

  1. #1
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    Fiscal sanity? Let's hope so

    Interesting that it's coming from the party that made such a fiscal mess... but hey, if they back it up I'm happy! the enormous debt is way too much and good to see some light finally shining on this issue


    [url]http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18151218/from/RS.1/[/url]

    GOP candidates say they'll be tightwads
    But their records don't necessarily back up their pledges
    The Associated Press
    Updated: 12:34 p.m. ET April 17, 2007

    WASHINGTON - Presidential hopefuls Rudy Giuliani, John McCain and Mitt Romney want you to know they'll be cheapskates with taxpayer money - and they'll be proud of it.

    "This country needs a president who can exercise fiscal discipline!" cries Giuliani, the former New York City mayor. Romney, the ex-governor of Massachusetts, asserts: "It makes no sense for us to keep on spending more money than we take in." And, McCain, the Arizona senator, adds: "We need to get it under control."

    With such crowd-pleasing lines, the leading Republican presidential candidates are making limited spending a key part of their campaigns as they court voters frustrated with soaring deficits and lawmakers' pet projects.

    Fiscal conservatives
    The pitch is aimed at the GOP's economic conservatives, who are important to winning the Republican nomination - and their support might be more likely than the party's social conservatives voting for any of them.

    Conservatives make up a significant part of the GOP base, with more than 68 percent of Republicans identifying themselves with that label in an Associated Press-Ipsos poll this month. However, a recent study found only 28 percent of those in the Republican Party call themselves hard-core social conservatives. That means a fiscally conservative message could have wide impact.

    Spending restraint also is a topic that cuts across party lines and, thus, it could benefit candidates in states whose primary contests aren't limited to Republican voters.

    "It's a unifying theme," said David Keating, executive director of the anti-tax group Club for Growth. "No one wants Congress and the president wasting their money."

    Irresponsibility budgeting
    Like all voters, Republicans care deeply about economic issues, such as taxes and spending, even though Iraq and terrorism remain their foremost concerns.

    Over the past few years, pollsters say, Republicans have grown increasingly agitated by what they call irresponsible budgeting in Washington, but they haven't been as vocal about it as Democrats, perhaps to avoid being critical of President Bush and GOP lawmakers who controlled Congress until this year.

    "Maybe these candidates can tap into something that's been under the surface for some time," said Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center. "It's also a nice way, perhaps, for them to distance themselves from President Bush in a way that other Republicans wouldn't see as disloyal."

    At the same time, Giuliani, McCain and Romney may have little choice but to try to reach conservatives with economic messages rather than social messages. For various reasons, conservatives who oppose abortion, gay rights and gun control haven't fully embraced any of the three top candidates.

    "Since they all have problems appealing to social conservatives, they have to look to see where their strengths are as candidates," said Costas Panagopoulos, a Fordham University political science professor.

    Thus, fiscal restraint is a pillar of all three campaigns.

    Get some backbone
    Lesser-known GOP candidates, including Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, Kansas Sen. Sam Brownback and ex-Gov. Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, also have taken up the cause. Those three call themselves strong fiscal conservatives, advocating lower taxes and more frugal spending.

    It's a message that resonates with Republicans like Rick and Carol Hammen of Clive, Iowa. They list spending, taxes and the economy as second only to security as issues that matter most to them.

    "The Republican Party has got to get some backbone. Important bills should not have pork attached, and the veto pen has got to come out," Carol Hammen says. Adds Rick Hammen: "We would be in a lot better shape if we controlled our spending."

    Candidates' records
    Mindful of such sentiments, Giuliani draws on his experiences as mayor of the country's largest city to argue that he practices what he preaches.

    "We need to reduce spending," he told a crowd in West Des Moines, Iowa, recently. "That's how you make government more effective, that's how you make government more efficient."

    Despite his pitch, records from New York City's independent budget office show the city payroll grew during his tenure and fees and fines increased. Giuliani also successfully sued to challenge the constitutionality of the line-item veto that would have given President Clinton the power to eliminate wasteful spending.

    In a visit to Iowa's statehouse in Des Moines, Romney sounded similar themes. "We have to rein in spending," he declared, and then acknowledged: "We spent too much as Republicans."

    Echoing a TV ad he's running, Romney proposed capping discretionary nonmilitary spending at the inflation rate minus 1 percent, and he vowed to veto any bill that Congress sends him that's above that level.

    His campaign often boasts that he turned a $3 billion budget deficit into a $1 billion surplus as governor. The state's fiscal health clearly improved during his tenure, but state budget analysts say both numbers are inflated. And while Romney refused to raise taxes, he boosted fees for state services and closed so-called corporate tax loopholes in what critics call a back-door tax increase.

    McCain gave a speech Monday in Memphis, Tenn., in which he renewed his long-standing campaign to curtail government spending. He frequently tells voters that Republicans lost power in Congress in November because the GOP squandered taxpayers' money.

    "The spending got out of control and we got the greatest increase in the size of government since the Great Society," McCain said recently in Mason City, Iowa. He mocked a $3 million plan to study the DNA of bears in Montana and a proposal to build a $223 million "bridge to nowhere" in Alaska.

    Then, he declared: "When one of these bills comes across my desk and it has a pork-barrel project in it, I will veto it and I will make the author of it famous, I promise you!"

    McCain typically earns high marks from fiscal conservatives for his push to curtail wasteful spending. But critics take issue with his position on taxes. McCain opposed Bush's tax cuts in 2001 and 2003 but now advocates extending them. He says that doing otherwise would amount to a tax increase.

  2. #2
    JetsInsider.com Legend
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    Don't.

    Believe.

    A.

    Word.

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]giuliani is a self-proclaimed fiscal conservative...good stuff.

    another reason why he is the best candidate.[/QUOTE]


    I remember somebody else saying that....

    Hmmmmmm...but i can't remember who.....

    Gorge Push? No....Prime Mesident Blush? I dunno...can't remember. Must be my choice of tobacco...

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]find me where he said that.[/QUOTE]


    Sorry...I forgot about the Republican platform of spending money like a drunken sailor at a strip club. If I remember correctly, that's what his campaign slogan for the 2000 election was...

    [SIZE=4][B]VOTE BUSH/CHENEY...because we can spend money faster than the Dumbocrats...[/B][/SIZE]

  5. #5

    TanG, you may like this one....

    Closing Tot Contribs Operating Exps Burn Rate
    Brownback For President $806,626 $1,291,024 $1,030,492 79.82%

    Gilmore For President $90,107 $174,790 $113,790 65.10%

    Rudy Giuliani Presidential Committee $11,949,735 $16,077,670 $6,041,029 37.57%

    Hunter For President $272,552 $502,424 $263,422 52.43%

    John McCain 2008 $5,180,799 $13,680,081 $9,589,674 70.10%

    Ron Paul 2008 Presidential Campaign Committee $524,919 $639,989 $114,970 17.96%

    Romney For President $11,863,653 $20,982,788 $11,325,342 53.97%

    Tancredo For A Secure America $575,078 $1,185,536 $711,012 59.97%

    Tommy Thompson For President $139,723 $315,128 $252,312 80.07%




    Closing Tot Contribs Operating Exps Burn Rate
    Biden for President $2,838,916 $2,112,990 $1,172,174 55.5%

    Hillary Clinton for President $30,974,780 $26,054,302 $5,059,515 19.4%

    Chris Dodd for President $7,482,467 $4,043,757 $1,313,239 32.5%

    John Edwards for President $10,731,881 $14,029,654 $3,291,632 23.5%

    Mike Gravel for President $498 $34,720 $107,737 310%

    Kucinich for President $163,887 $358,569 $194,443 54.2%

    Obama for America $19,192,521 $25,709,105 $6,554,783 25.5%

    Bill Richardson for President $5,022,473 $6,246,382 $1,217,057 19.5%


    [url]http://rightsfield.com/2007/04/16/first-quarter-numbers/[/url]


    Looks like some folks are stretching the truth as far as being conservative.
    As a whole the democrats are more conservative as far as spending.

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]im not saying that im pro or anti bush...just wondering when bush said he was a fiscal conservative. (because he didnt.)[/QUOTE]


    "I am a fiscal conservative and a family conservative. And I am a compassionate conservative, because I know my philosophy is optimistic and full of hope for every American." So George W. Bush described himself and his beliefs on the eve of his first campaign for President.

    [url]http://www.thenation.com/doc/20030915/conason[/url]

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]from that site...
    Giuliani is the only Republican with an actual funding base which isnít expensive to maintain
    so he pretty much is a fiscal conservative then, huh?[/QUOTE]


    that logic means that except for Biden & Kucicinich the Democrats are fiscal conservative and far and away the most fiscally conservative party in '08 ;)

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg]Closing Tot Contribs Operating Exps Burn Rate
    Brownback For President $806,626 $1,291,024 $1,030,492 79.82%

    Gilmore For President $90,107 $174,790 $113,790 65.10%

    Rudy Giuliani Presidential Committee $11,949,735 $16,077,670 $6,041,029 37.57%

    Hunter For President $272,552 $502,424 $263,422 52.43%

    John McCain 2008 $5,180,799 $13,680,081 $9,589,674 70.10%

    Ron Paul 2008 Presidential Campaign Committee $524,919 $639,989 $114,970 17.96%

    Romney For President $11,863,653 $20,982,788 $11,325,342 53.97%

    Tancredo For A Secure America $575,078 $1,185,536 $711,012 59.97%

    Tommy Thompson For President $139,723 $315,128 $252,312 80.07%




    Closing Tot Contribs Operating Exps Burn Rate
    Biden for President $2,838,916 $2,112,990 $1,172,174 55.5%

    Hillary Clinton for President $30,974,780 $26,054,302 $5,059,515 19.4%

    Chris Dodd for President $7,482,467 $4,043,757 $1,313,239 32.5%

    John Edwards for President $10,731,881 $14,029,654 $3,291,632 23.5%

    Mike Gravel for President $498 $34,720 $107,737 310%

    Kucinich for President $163,887 $358,569 $194,443 54.2%

    Obama for America $19,192,521 $25,709,105 $6,554,783 25.5%

    Bill Richardson for President $5,022,473 $6,246,382 $1,217,057 19.5%


    [url]http://rightsfield.com/2007/04/16/first-quarter-numbers/[/url]


    Looks like some folks are stretching the truth as far as being conservative.
    As a whole the democrats are more conservative as far as spending.[/QUOTE]


    impressive burn rates for the dems... going to make it even more difficult for the GOP in a very difficult year for them

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]one party doesnt win the election, one person does. and that person is RUDY![/QUOTE]

    Not to burst your bubble but Rudy has about as much chance as I do... you probably shouldn't get your hopes up, he may not even make it out of the fall let alone make it to the primaries

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]how does the clear front runner have no chance?[/QUOTE]

    because if you can't get out of the primaries, you can't get to the general election (which he would lose anyways)

    the man has zero chance in the GOP... once people get over the burn-horn stuff on 9/11, there's not what GOP voters are looking for, and a lot of what GOP voters are not looking for.

    I would love nothing more than Giuliani being the GOP nominee as it might end up with the party fractured in 2 and really open up possibilities for 3rd, 4th and maybe 5th party sytem instead of the 2-wing (1 party, 2 wings) system which currently governs us... plus it would ensure that the White House isn't in GOP hands where as you see they do maximum damage almost everytime they hold it



    and "front runner" (even though it's highly debatable right now, I'll humor you) means absolutely nothing in 4/2007... if it was 11/2007 or 12/2007 there would be weight to that

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe](because he didnt.)[/QUOTE]

    [B]Oh really?[/B]


    [QUOTE=Tanginius]"I am a fiscal conservative and a family conservative. And I am a compassionate conservative, because I know my philosophy is optimistic and full of hope for every American." So George W. Bush described himself and his beliefs on the eve of his first campaign for President.

    [url]http://www.thenation.com/doc/20030915/conason[/url][/QUOTE]

  12. #12
    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]from that site...
    Giuliani is the only Republican with an actual funding base which isnít expensive to maintain
    so he pretty much is a fiscal conservative then, huh?[/QUOTE]

    While he is still burning money faster than the leading democrats, he appears to be more cautious than the other republicans who look to be taking lessons from Bush/Cheney.

    I can't say he is a fiscal conservative as so far he is still outspending the democrats.

  13. #13
    I don't consider Bush a conservative, he spends money like a Texas Huah.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan]I don't consider Bush a conservative, he spends money like a Texas Huah.[/QUOTE]


    Well, six years into his presidency....I hope others have the same epiphany you have....

    What do you consider Bush then? A liberal republican?

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=Jets Babe]alright, dont get too excited that you are correct for once...[/QUOTE]

    I'm married. Being right doesn't happen too often for me... :D




    [QUOTE=Jets Babe] i think i trust giuliani more than bush though. just saying...[/QUOTE]

    I trust that dude who keeps emailing me from Nigeria more than I trust Bush....

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