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Thread: our ally Musharraf: a real swell guy

  1. #1

    our ally Musharraf: a real swell guy

    [quote]
    Musharraf in troubled waters Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2007 7:39 AM
    Categories: Islamabad, Pakistan
    By NBC Newsí Fakhar ur-Rehman and Carol Grisanti in Islamabad
    Pakistanís Pervez Musharraf has long been a true political survivor. In the eight years since he seized power in a military coup and pursued a vision for a non-theological Islamic state, he has endured three assassination attempts as well as weathering many political storms -- from the opposition parties, Islamic parties and even from within his own political base.

    But he may now have picked a fight he cannot win.

    His decision on March 9 to suspend the Supreme Courtís chief justice, Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, on allegations of misconduct has unleashed a crisis that has left his regime struggling to survive as it faces a countrywide pro-democracy movement, with Chaudhry becoming a touchstone for those who want to see an end to military rule.

    "Go Musharraf Go!" shouted the thousands gathered outside the Pakistan Supreme Court building in the nationís capital, Islamabad, last Saturday night.

    "Absolute power corrupts absolutely," warned Chaudhry, quoting the 19th century English historian Lord Acton in a 25-minute speech against military dictatorship.

    The protests against Musharraf have become more widespread and more violent -- plunging the country into the worst political crisis it has seen since the army seized power in a bloodless coup in 1999.

    More than 40 people were killed in Karachi, Pakistanís largest city and financial hub, when Chaudhry tried to address the local bar association. Most Pakistanis blame Musharraf and his political allies for the carnage.

    Lead-up to the dismissal
    A well-placed intelligence source who was privy to the lead-up to Chaudhryís dismissal said that the removal of the chief justice came "because he had annoyed those who matter in the intelligence ranks and among the police."

    The same source, who requested anonymity, added that Chaudhry "had passed down judgments and questioned the authority of the intelligence agencies in the cases of missing persons."

    Hundreds of people have disappeared in Pakistan, many of them picked up by Pakistanís powerful intelligence agents and kept in secret detention centers, critics charge. These same people say the government has exploited the current anti-terrorism climate to get rid of those who they deem to be enemies of the state.

    As chief justice, Chaudhry had started investigations and called the governmentís actions a "violation of fundamental human rights."

    "When I was arrested and taken into a torture cell," said one recently released prisoner who spoke on the condition of anonymity, "intelligence guys were saying that this chief justice couldnít rule against them. The moment he does, he will be out of his job."

    But it was not just the anger of Pakistanís spies that cost Chaudhry his job, observers say. Many believe that Musharraf saw the former chief justice as someone who would challenge his plans to run for re-election later this year.

    On February 24, just two weeks before he was dismissed, Chaudhry was asked whether it was constitutional for Musharraf to seek re-election as president. He responded, "I will decide according to the law and the constitution." Apparently, that was not the response Musharraf was looking for.

    Verdict still out
    Not everyone is counting Musharraf out yet. Many Pakistanis think that he will weather this storm, primarily because he has the backing of the United States government.

    "The U.S. will continue to support President Musharraf because there is no substitute for him in the army who can, and will, give the kind of support the U.S. wants in the war on terror," said Lt. General Hamid Javed, formerly Pakistanís Secretary of Defense.

    And even more important are the top generals at home. The very powerful Pakistan Army Corp commanders are still with Musharraf. As long as they don't withdraw their support his grip on power seems assured.

    [url]http://worldblog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/05/31/209473.aspx[/url]
    [/quote]

    it's really great we support such a great example of democracy like the "President" of Pakistan. Thanks be to George.

  2. #2
    [QUOTE=bitonti]it's really great we support such a great example of democracy like the "President" of Pakistan. Thanks be to George.[/QUOTE]

    You know, he's in a tough spot. If the populace there could vote on it, they'd probably give their considerable nuclear arsenal to all the Al Qaeda goons hiding out on their side of the border, and then we'd be really screwed. He's been as pro-U.S. as he could be, and that's nearly gotten him assasinated.

    That said, it is further proof what utter folly our attempt at building Democracy in Iraq has been. Not only does it show that true Middle East Democracy and U.S. security interests are wholly irreconcilable at this point, but it also shows that our aggression in Iraq has destabilized even "friendly" middle eastern countries.

    From what I've read, there seems to be much more vocal anti-American sentiment in Pakistan today than there was before the Iraq war, and Musharafs actions suggest his hold on power may be more tenuous.

  3. #3
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola]If the populace there could vote on it, they'd probably give their considerable nuclear arsenal to all the Al Qaeda goons hiding out on their side of the border, and then we'd be really screwed. [/QUOTE]


    this is among the most ill-conceived notions of the Bush administration

    the idea that a dictator would work for decades to scrap up a couple measly nukes and then GIVE these weapons away to suicide bombers to the USA.

    lesson: world leaders don't give nukes away to anyone for any reason. World leaders are interested in self-preservation not suicide bombers for the sake of pure destruction. there isn't even enough money in the world to buy a nuke from a world leader, the enriched uranium is more valuable than a room full of cash

  4. #4
    flushingjet
    Guest
    [QUOTE=bitonti]this is among the most ill-conceived notions of the Bush administration

    the idea that a dictator would work for decades to scrap up a couple measly nukes and then GIVE these weapons away to suicide bombers to the USA.

    lesson: world leaders don't give nukes away to anyone for any reason. World leaders are interested in self-preservation not suicide bombers for the sake of pure destruction. there isn't even enough money in the world to buy a nuke from a world leader, the enriched uranium is more valuable than a room full of cash[/QUOTE]

    i love our resident young lions who know nothing of history
    these loose screws' opinions would be pure comedy gold if not so damn life-threatening to the rest of us

    and of course if you disagree your notion has to be not only ill-conceived but
    also linked to bush and his administration

    maybe you have heard of nuclear proliferation?

    mostly from our adversaries to countries that dont need it, chiefly to oppose american / other regional powers

    the indians lost to the chinese..they want nukes
    the pakistanis got whupped by the indians....they want nukes
    the arabs got spanked by the israelis...they want nukes
    and so on

    like france giving israel, iraq and (w) pakistan nuclear technology
    or our own "atoms for peace"
    or russia helping china, and sticking them in cuba and elsewhere
    or china in turn helping mush and kim jung mentally-ill
    and in turn mush/the ummahs own aq khan network to libya iran and
    gd knows where else
    hardly a "world leader" in the whole rotten bunch

    riddle me this: exactly where did/does mush get all the cash for his uranium/rockets from? his vast oil fields?
    if it aint from ripping off foreign aid, the imf and world bank,
    while their people starve
    as bj bill might say, "its the ummah, stupid"

    to be confident no nation will "give away" wmd technology
    when its already happened for decades, thats a puzzler

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=bitonti]it's really great we support such a great example of democracy like the "President" of Pakistan. Thanks be to George.[/QUOTE]


    The reason Musharif is the President of Pakistan was Clinton's pressure on the elected Pakistani government to withdraw the army from Kashmir and initiate peace with India. That was the push that created the coup against the elected government.

    You can't blame this one on Bush and you have no idea what are relations are with the opposition.

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=flushingjet]i love our resident young lions who know nothing of history[/QUOTE]

    i dare you to find one instance in history where a nuclear device was handed over from a world leader to a suicidal terrorist.

  7. #7
    flushingjet
    Guest
    [QUOTE=bitonti]i dare you to find one instance in history where a nuclear device was handed over from a world leader to a suicidal terrorist.[/QUOTE]

    wow, thats a very strict but wholly liberal definition
    and a triple dog dare to boot

    a terrorist has to be suicidal also before we can worry about him/her

    what if they are un-suicidal or genocidal like ahmanutjob or
    kim jung mentally-ill and use icbms...dont worry be happy?

    well, we have france giving the technology
    culminating in osirak to iraq...anecdotally
    for as slight of a reason of a seafood dish jacques chirac
    couldnt live without...or maybe it was a sweetheart oil deal

    we have libya/khadafy, a closet case/certifiable kook
    w/ real wmds + nukes from the aq khan network
    surrendered & dismantled after we kicked hussein out

    you know the ones our spooks couldnt find-
    they couldnt find their a$$ with both hands

    the libs love to gloss over that one
    thats why iraq was a 2 for 1 deal....knock out one
    kook get another free of charge

    another reason why we are safer
    even Hillary said so last night

    and surely you remember the cuban missile crisis
    (no, not the bj clinton/cigar thing)
    where even khruschev had to keep castros feverish paws
    from the button he was ready to push

    i love lib kooks looking for proof for the things they dont
    believe in or fear yet have proof of fantasies like
    global warming...

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