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Thread: ***Now This Could Be The Start of Something Good***

  1. #1

    ***Now This Could Be The Start of Something Good***

    [B][SIZE="4"]Barnstorming Obama plans to pick Republicans for cabinet[/SIZE][/B]

    [url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article3466823.ece?print=yes&randnum=1204464352734[/url]

    Sarah Baxter
    AS Barack Obama enters the final stages of the fight for the Democratic presidential nomination, he is preparing to detach the core voters of John McCain, the likely Republican nominee, with the same ruthless determination with which he has peeled off Hillary Clinton’s supporters.

    The scene is set for a tussle between the two candidates for the support of some of the sharpest and most independent minds in politics. [B]Obama is hoping to appoint cross-party figures to his cabinet such as Chuck Hagel, the Republican senator for Nebraska and an opponent of the Iraq war, and Richard Lugar, leader of the Republicans on the Senate foreign relations committee. [/B]

    Senior advisers confirmed that Hagel, a highly decorated Vietnam war veteran and one of McCain’s closest friends in the Senate, was considered an ideal candidate for defence secretary. Some regard the outspoken Republican as a possible vice-presidential nominee although that might be regarded as a “stretch”.

    Asked about his choice of cabinet last week, Obama told The Sunday Times: “Chuck Hagel is a great friend of mine and I respect him very much,” although he was wary of appearing as though he was already choosing the White House curtains. But after winning 11 primary contests in a row after Super Tuesday, he is ready to elbow Clinton off the stage.

    Little more than a year ago the Illiniois senator, 46, used to laugh that he was called Alabama or Yo! Mama, because so few people knew his name. If he can win one or both of the Texas or Ohio primaries on Tuesday, he is expected to wrap up the Democratic nomination – and begin the next phase of the battle for the presidency against McCain.

    The Sunday Times was aboard Obama One, his private campaign jet, as he crisscrossed the two key primary states. It was an exhilarating ride with a candidate on the cusp of making history and robbing Clinton, who aimed to be America’s first woman president, of a distinction she thought was hers for the taking.

    Obama is cutting a dash through Texas, addressing up to 20,000 people a day, and has overtaken Clinton by two points in the polls, according to Real-ClearPolitics. In blue-collar, recession-struck Ohio, he has narrowed the gap to within five points of his rival.

    From snowbound Cleveland, where the ice was scraped off the wings of the jet before it could take off, to balmy Texas, where spring has arrived, the journey took Obama from one rally to the next where huge, multiracial crowds cheered wildly and stomped to cries of: “Yes, we can.”

    On the plane Obama walked the aisle, chatting to journalists with a confidence that came from knowing his mighty opponent might be on her way out of the race in 48 hours and a slight edge of nervousness that the nomination is now his to lose.

    Narrow wins for Clinton in both Texas and Ohio might encourage her to fight on, although Obama’s team believes she needs a lead of more than 5% to justify continuing her campaign.

    Obama is taking nothing for granted in his quest to become America’s first black president. “Remember New Hampshire!” he said, recalling the primary upset that restored Clinton’s status as the frontrunner after her initial shock defeat in Iowa.

    Earlier Obama had told the audience at a suburban high school rally in Dallas, Texas, that he intended to follow the example of his hero, President Abraham Lincoln, and appoint a cabinet of the talents, irrespective of party labels.

    “I think America deserves the best person for every job and so we are going to be canvassing far and wide if I am fortunate enough to be elected,” he said.

    Richard Reardon, 64, a security officer and veteran, said: “I’ll be honest. Maybe 20 years ago, I’d never have voted for a black man, but after the Bushes and the Clintons, give the man a chance.”

    After overtaking Clinton in the national polls, as well as the popular vote and delegate count in the Democratic primary contest, Obama is now sizing up McCain with the same cool eye for signs of weakness.

    They are evenly matched in the polls, an enviable position compared with the 20-point lead Clinton held over Obama for the best part of last year. He believes he will be able to make deep inroads into the conservative vote that put George W Bush into the White House twice but might not transfer its loyalty to his successor. McCain blurted out that he was a “conservative liberal Republican” last week, a slip of the tongue that confirmed the fears of die-hard Republicans that he is not one of them.

    But the Arizona senator, 71, has an advantage over Obama, a foreign policy novice, on defence and national security. Republicans intend to draw a sharp contrast between McCain, who was imprisoned in the “Hanoi Hilton” by the North Vietnamese, and Obama, who was a schoolboy on the same continent in Indonesia at the time.

    Obama got a taste of McCain’s withering scorn last week when he was ridiculed for appearing to suggest in a televised debate with Clinton that Al-Qaeda was not in Iraq. “I have news for you,” McCain chided him. The terrorist group was already there and was called “Al-Qaeda in Iraq". Round one, by general consent, went to McCain.

    Obama believes he will be able to neutralise McCain by drawing on the expertise of independent Republicans such as Hagel and Lugar, who is regarded by Obama as a potential secretary of state.

    [B]Larry Korb, a defence official under President Ronald Reagan who is backing Obama, said: “By putting a Republican in the Pentagon and the State Department you send a signal to Congress and the American people that issues of national security are above politics.” [/B]

    Korb recalled that President John F Kennedy appointed Robert McNamara, a Republican, as defence secretary in 1961. “Hagel is not only a Republican but a military veteran who would reassure the troops that there was somebody in the Pentagon who understood their hopes, concerns and fears,” he said.

    Obama intends to pour more troops and resources into defeating the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    He told The Sunday Times he would expect European allies to contribute more to the fight. “You can’t have a situation where the United States and Britain are called on to do the dirty work and nobody else wants to engage in actual fire-fights with the Taliban.”

    He praised Prince Harry’s “commendable” service - “I’m sure the British people are very proud of him” - and said America would have a “special, special relationship” with Britain should he win the White House. “That’s inviolable,” he said.

    Europe, he added, would get something in return for an extra push in Afghanistan. “It’s important for us to send a signal that we’re going to be listening to them when it comes to policies they find objectionable, Iraq being top of the list.”

    If education is to be Obama’s signature issue, he might consider appointing Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, as his czar. The billionaire media magnate last week ruled out running for president as an independent and said he would offer his support to whichever candidate took the most nonpartisan approach to America’s problems. The subtext was clear: “Hire me.”

  2. #2
    [QUOTE=intelligentjetsfan;2403576][B][SIZE="4"]Barnstorming Obama plans to pick Republicans for cabinet[/SIZE][/B]

    [url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article3466823.ece?print=yes&randnum=1204464352734[/url]

    Sarah Baxter
    AS Barack Obama enters the final stages of the fight for the Democratic presidential nomination, he is preparing to detach the core voters of John McCain, the likely Republican nominee, with the same ruthless determination with which he has peeled off Hillary Clinton’s supporters.

    The scene is set for a tussle between the two candidates for the support of some of the sharpest and most independent minds in politics. [B]Obama is hoping to appoint cross-party figures to his cabinet such as Chuck Hagel, the Republican senator for Nebraska and an opponent of the Iraq war, and Richard Lugar, leader of the Republicans on the Senate foreign relations committee. [/B]

    Senior advisers confirmed that Hagel, a highly decorated Vietnam war veteran and one of McCain’s closest friends in the Senate, was considered an ideal candidate for defence secretary. Some regard the outspoken Republican as a possible vice-presidential nominee although that might be regarded as a “stretch”.

    Asked about his choice of cabinet last week, Obama told The Sunday Times: “Chuck Hagel is a great friend of mine and I respect him very much,” although he was wary of appearing as though he was already choosing the White House curtains. But after winning 11 primary contests in a row after Super Tuesday, he is ready to elbow Clinton off the stage.

    Little more than a year ago the Illiniois senator, 46, used to laugh that he was called Alabama or Yo! Mama, because so few people knew his name. If he can win one or both of the Texas or Ohio primaries on Tuesday, he is expected to wrap up the Democratic nomination – and begin the next phase of the battle for the presidency against McCain.

    The Sunday Times was aboard Obama One, his private campaign jet, as he crisscrossed the two key primary states. It was an exhilarating ride with a candidate on the cusp of making history and robbing Clinton, who aimed to be America’s first woman president, of a distinction she thought was hers for the taking.

    Obama is cutting a dash through Texas, addressing up to 20,000 people a day, and has overtaken Clinton by two points in the polls, according to Real-ClearPolitics. In blue-collar, recession-struck Ohio, he has narrowed the gap to within five points of his rival.

    From snowbound Cleveland, where the ice was scraped off the wings of the jet before it could take off, to balmy Texas, where spring has arrived, the journey took Obama from one rally to the next where huge, multiracial crowds cheered wildly and stomped to cries of: “Yes, we can.”

    On the plane Obama walked the aisle, chatting to journalists with a confidence that came from knowing his mighty opponent might be on her way out of the race in 48 hours and a slight edge of nervousness that the nomination is now his to lose.

    Narrow wins for Clinton in both Texas and Ohio might encourage her to fight on, although Obama’s team believes she needs a lead of more than 5% to justify continuing her campaign.

    Obama is taking nothing for granted in his quest to become America’s first black president. “Remember New Hampshire!” he said, recalling the primary upset that restored Clinton’s status as the frontrunner after her initial shock defeat in Iowa.

    Earlier Obama had told the audience at a suburban high school rally in Dallas, Texas, that he intended to follow the example of his hero, President Abraham Lincoln, and appoint a cabinet of the talents, irrespective of party labels.

    “I think America deserves the best person for every job and so we are going to be canvassing far and wide if I am fortunate enough to be elected,” he said.

    Richard Reardon, 64, a security officer and veteran, said: “I’ll be honest. Maybe 20 years ago, I’d never have voted for a black man, but after the Bushes and the Clintons, give the man a chance.”

    After overtaking Clinton in the national polls, as well as the popular vote and delegate count in the Democratic primary contest, Obama is now sizing up McCain with the same cool eye for signs of weakness.

    They are evenly matched in the polls, an enviable position compared with the 20-point lead Clinton held over Obama for the best part of last year. He believes he will be able to make deep inroads into the conservative vote that put George W Bush into the White House twice but might not transfer its loyalty to his successor. McCain blurted out that he was a “conservative liberal Republican” last week, a slip of the tongue that confirmed the fears of die-hard Republicans that he is not one of them.

    But the Arizona senator, 71, has an advantage over Obama, a foreign policy novice, on defence and national security. Republicans intend to draw a sharp contrast between McCain, who was imprisoned in the “Hanoi Hilton” by the North Vietnamese, and Obama, who was a schoolboy on the same continent in Indonesia at the time.

    Obama got a taste of McCain’s withering scorn last week when he was ridiculed for appearing to suggest in a televised debate with Clinton that Al-Qaeda was not in Iraq. “I have news for you,” McCain chided him. The terrorist group was already there and was called “Al-Qaeda in Iraq". Round one, by general consent, went to McCain.

    Obama believes he will be able to neutralise McCain by drawing on the expertise of independent Republicans such as Hagel and Lugar, who is regarded by Obama as a potential secretary of state.

    [B]Larry Korb, a defence official under President Ronald Reagan who is backing Obama, said: “By putting a Republican in the Pentagon and the State Department you send a signal to Congress and the American people that issues of national security are above politics.” [/B]

    Korb recalled that President John F Kennedy appointed Robert McNamara, a Republican, as defence secretary in 1961. “Hagel is not only a Republican but a military veteran who would reassure the troops that there was somebody in the Pentagon who understood their hopes, concerns and fears,” he said.

    Obama intends to pour more troops and resources into defeating the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    He told The Sunday Times he would expect European allies to contribute more to the fight. “You can’t have a situation where the United States and Britain are called on to do the dirty work and nobody else wants to engage in actual fire-fights with the Taliban.”

    He praised Prince Harry’s “commendable” service - “I’m sure the British people are very proud of him” - and said America would have a “special, special relationship” with Britain should he win the White House. “That’s inviolable,” he said.

    Europe, he added, would get something in return for an extra push in Afghanistan. “It’s important for us to send a signal that we’re going to be listening to them when it comes to policies they find objectionable, Iraq being top of the list.”

    If education is to be Obama’s signature issue, he might consider appointing Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, as his czar. The billionaire media magnate last week ruled out running for president as an independent and said he would offer his support to whichever candidate took the most nonpartisan approach to America’s problems. The subtext was clear: “Hire me.”[/QUOTE]did you see that french actress' quote about 9/11?

  3. #3
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    Hagel isn't much of a Republican.

  4. #4
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    How about he wins the nomination, much less the general election, first.

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=Piper;2403589]Hagel isn't much of a Republican.[/QUOTE]

    Because he has a mind of his own and doesn't play follow the leader$.......
    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Hagel#Criticism_of_the_Bush_Administration[/url]

    Criticism of the Bush Administration
    On August 18, 2005, Hagel compared the Iraq War to Vietnam and openly mocked Vice President Dick Cheney's assertion that the Iraqi insurgency was in its "last throes."[6]

    In November 2005, Hagel made a much-publicized statement: "To question your government is not unpatriotic — to not question your government is unpatriotic." This was in reference to the increasing amount of debate surrounding the Iraq War, and his assertion that the United States should withdraw its troops.

    In December 2005, in reference to Bush, the GOP, and the PATRIOT Act, Hagel made a much-publicized statement: "I took an oath of office to the Constitution, I didn't take an oath of office to my party or my president."[7]

    In January 2006, Hagel took issue with Karl Rove over controversial statements the White House advisor made concerning the mindset of Republicans and Democrats. Hagel said, "Well, I didn't like what Mr. Rove said, because it frames terrorism and the issue of terrorism and everything that goes with it, whether it's the renewal of the Patriot Act or the NSA wiretapping, in a political context." He also said that "dark clouds" are hanging over the Republican party", and "If you look at the environment and the atmospherics politically in this town, read any poll. The sixth year of a governing party usually ... is not good ... the country is tired, a lot of complications in these international issues, we're at war."[8]

    Hagel further criticized the Bush administration, saying, "National security is more important than the Republican Party or the Democratic Party. And to use it to try and get someone elected will ultimately end up in defeat and disaster for that political party."[8]

    In July 2006, Hagel again took issue with the Bush administration, this time on its handling of the Israel-Lebanon issue saying "The sickening slaughter on both sides must end and it must end now. President Bush must call for an immediate cease-fire. This madness must stop."[9]

    After Republican losses in the 2006 midterm election, Hagel penned an editorial in the Washington Post highly critical of military strategies both employed and proposed for Iraq. He unequivocally declared that "There will be no victory or defeat for the United States in Iraq," and called for a "phased troop withdrawal"—making Hagel one of the most prominent voices in his party to do so.[10]

    According to a SurveyUSA poll, Hagel has a 10% higher approval rating among Nebraska Democrats than Republicans.[11][12] OnTheIssues.org rates Hagel as a "libertarian-leaning conservative."

    In January 2007, Hagel openly criticized President Bush's plan to send an additional 20,000 additional troops to Iraq. He called it, "the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since Vietnam, if it's carried out."[13]

    Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
    Chuck HagelTogether with Democrats Joseph Biden and Carl Levin he proposed a non-binding resolution to the Democratic-controlled Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which rejected Bush's policy as "not in the national interest" in a 12-9 vote.[14] However, in a Senate vote of 94-2 to revoke executive power to replace federal prosecutors without a preliminary hearing, Senator Hagel and Senator Kit Bond were the only opposition.[15]

    After an April 2007 visit to Iraq with Pennsylvania Democratic Representative Joe Sestak, Hagel expressed his belief that support of Iraq should not continue indefinitely and defended Congressional actions to set a timeline for an end in occupation.

    In July 2007, Hagel expressed his intention to cooperate with Senate Democrats in voting for a bill that would set a timeline to get out of Iraq.[16]

    In November 2007, he rated the Bush administration "the lowest in capacity, in capability, in policy, in consensus -- almost every area" of any presidency in the last forty years. He also revealed he is open to running as vice-president with the 2008 Democratic nominee.[17] In the same month, he said, "I have to say this is one of the most arrogant, incompetent administrations I've ever seen or ever read about. They have failed the country.

  6. #6
    Republicans and democrats working together. Sounds good to me.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=HDCentStOhio;2403596]How about he wins the nomination, much less the general election, first.[/QUOTE]

    never mind the fact that Hagel and Lugar have a fraction of the influence and appeal of Lieberman, who already stated he is backing McCain....

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=intelligentjetsfan;2403944]Republicans and democrats working together. Sounds good to me.[/QUOTE]

    funny thing- McCain's been working with the rats for years.....they just never reciprocate....

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2404140]funny thing- McCain's been working with the rats for years.....they just never reciprocate....[/QUOTE]

    who has not reciprocated? The dems who worked with McCain have mostly been complimentary of McCain's efforts.

    Hagel and lugar are popular with republicans who are not in the pockets of Boeing and Lockheed-Martin. The point is that they are politicans who are not divisive and yet they are from the other aisle. why would Obama appoint a polarizing figure, democrat or republican? The larger issue is that a democratic president could be appointing sound republicans into his cabinet. maybe then we could cut back the scorthed-earth politics inside the white house.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=intelligentjetsfan;2403576][B][SIZE="4"]Barnstorming Obama plans to pick Republicans for cabinet[/SIZE][/B]

    [url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article3466823.ece?print=yes&randnum=1204464352734[/url]

    Sarah Baxter
    AS Barack Obama enters the final stages of the fight for the Democratic presidential nomination, he is preparing to detach the core voters of John McCain, the likely Republican nominee, with the same ruthless determination with which he has peeled off Hillary Clinton’s supporters.

    The scene is set for a tussle between the two candidates for the support of some of the sharpest and most independent minds in politics. [B]Obama is hoping to appoint cross-party figures to his cabinet such as Chuck Hagel, the Republican senator for Nebraska and an opponent of the Iraq war, and Richard Lugar, leader of the Republicans on the Senate foreign relations committee. [/B]

    Senior advisers confirmed that Hagel, a highly decorated Vietnam war veteran and one of McCain’s closest friends in the Senate, was considered an ideal candidate for defence secretary. Some regard the outspoken Republican as a possible vice-presidential nominee although that might be regarded as a “stretch”.

    Asked about his choice of cabinet last week, Obama told The Sunday Times: “Chuck Hagel is a great friend of mine and I respect him very much,” although he was wary of appearing as though he was already choosing the White House curtains. But after winning 11 primary contests in a row after Super Tuesday, he is ready to elbow Clinton off the stage.

    Little more than a year ago the Illiniois senator, 46, used to laugh that he was called Alabama or Yo! Mama, because so few people knew his name. If he can win one or both of the Texas or Ohio primaries on Tuesday, he is expected to wrap up the Democratic nomination – and begin the next phase of the battle for the presidency against McCain.

    The Sunday Times was aboard Obama One, his private campaign jet, as he crisscrossed the two key primary states. It was an exhilarating ride with a candidate on the cusp of making history and robbing Clinton, who aimed to be America’s first woman president, of a distinction she thought was hers for the taking.

    Obama is cutting a dash through Texas, addressing up to 20,000 people a day, and has overtaken Clinton by two points in the polls, according to Real-ClearPolitics. In blue-collar, recession-struck Ohio, he has narrowed the gap to within five points of his rival.

    From snowbound Cleveland, where the ice was scraped off the wings of the jet before it could take off, to balmy Texas, where spring has arrived, the journey took Obama from one rally to the next where huge, multiracial crowds cheered wildly and stomped to cries of: “Yes, we can.”

    On the plane Obama walked the aisle, chatting to journalists with a confidence that came from knowing his mighty opponent might be on her way out of the race in 48 hours and a slight edge of nervousness that the nomination is now his to lose.

    Narrow wins for Clinton in both Texas and Ohio might encourage her to fight on, although Obama’s team believes she needs a lead of more than 5% to justify continuing her campaign.

    Obama is taking nothing for granted in his quest to become America’s first black president. “Remember New Hampshire!” he said, recalling the primary upset that restored Clinton’s status as the frontrunner after her initial shock defeat in Iowa.

    Earlier Obama had told the audience at a suburban high school rally in Dallas, Texas, that he intended to follow the example of his hero, President Abraham Lincoln, and appoint a cabinet of the talents, irrespective of party labels.

    “I think America deserves the best person for every job and so we are going to be canvassing far and wide if I am fortunate enough to be elected,” he said.

    Richard Reardon, 64, a security officer and veteran, said: “I’ll be honest. Maybe 20 years ago, I’d never have voted for a black man, but after the Bushes and the Clintons, give the man a chance.”

    After overtaking Clinton in the national polls, as well as the popular vote and delegate count in the Democratic primary contest, Obama is now sizing up McCain with the same cool eye for signs of weakness.

    They are evenly matched in the polls, an enviable position compared with the 20-point lead Clinton held over Obama for the best part of last year. He believes he will be able to make deep inroads into the conservative vote that put George W Bush into the White House twice but might not transfer its loyalty to his successor. McCain blurted out that he was a “conservative liberal Republican” last week, a slip of the tongue that confirmed the fears of die-hard Republicans that he is not one of them.

    But the Arizona senator, 71, has an advantage over Obama, a foreign policy novice, on defence and national security. Republicans intend to draw a sharp contrast between McCain, who was imprisoned in the “Hanoi Hilton” by the North Vietnamese, and Obama, who was a schoolboy on the same continent in Indonesia at the time.

    Obama got a taste of McCain’s withering scorn last week when he was ridiculed for appearing to suggest in a televised debate with Clinton that Al-Qaeda was not in Iraq. “I have news for you,” McCain chided him. The terrorist group was already there and was called “Al-Qaeda in Iraq". Round one, by general consent, went to McCain.

    Obama believes he will be able to neutralise McCain by drawing on the expertise of independent Republicans such as Hagel and Lugar, who is regarded by Obama as a potential secretary of state.

    [B]Larry Korb, a defence official under President Ronald Reagan who is backing Obama, said: “By putting a Republican in the Pentagon and the State Department you send a signal to Congress and the American people that issues of national security are above politics.” [/B]

    Korb recalled that President John F Kennedy appointed Robert McNamara, a Republican, as defence secretary in 1961. “Hagel is not only a Republican but a military veteran who would reassure the troops that there was somebody in the Pentagon who understood their hopes, concerns and fears,” he said.

    Obama intends to pour more troops and resources into defeating the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    He told The Sunday Times he would expect European allies to contribute more to the fight. “You can’t have a situation where the United States and Britain are called on to do the dirty work and nobody else wants to engage in actual fire-fights with the Taliban.”

    He praised Prince Harry’s “commendable” service - “I’m sure the British people are very proud of him” - and said America would have a “special, special relationship” with Britain should he win the White House. “That’s inviolable,” he said.

    Europe, he added, would get something in return for an extra push in Afghanistan. “It’s important for us to send a signal that we’re going to be listening to them when it comes to policies they find objectionable, Iraq being top of the list.”

    If education is to be Obama’s signature issue, he might consider appointing Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, as his czar. The billionaire media magnate last week ruled out running for president as an independent and said he would offer his support to whichever candidate took the most nonpartisan approach to America’s problems. The subtext was clear: “Hire me.”[/QUOTE]



    lol!! Yes Obama has come down from the heavens to save the Earth. It's amazing the free pass this guy gets from the media. Picking Republicans for his cabinet, what a joke. Guy has the most Liberal voting record in the Senate, has done NOTHING of any value, yet now he is annointed as the leader of the free world. Unbelievable!!!!

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=firehermnow;2404708]lol!! Yes Obama has come down from the heavens to save the Earth. It's amazing the free pass this guy gets from the media. Picking Republicans for his cabinet, what a joke. Guy has the most Liberal voting record in the Senate, has done NOTHING of any value, yet now he is annointed as the leader of the free world. Unbelievable!!!![/QUOTE]

    If only he owned the texas rangers then he would have been ready. Obama should have started oil companies that specialized in drilling where there was no oil. That shows real business accumen.

  12. #12
    [QUOTE=intelligentjetsfan;2404839]If only he owned the texas rangers then he would have been ready. Obama should have started oil companies that specialized in drilling where there was no oil. That shows real business accumen.[/QUOTE]

    Or he could have been just another liberal political hack that the NY Times and CNN think is the 2nd coming. Any word about his "education" in Indonesia in those newspapers?

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=intelligentjetsfan;2403576][B][SIZE="4"]Barnstorming Obama plans to pick Republicans for cabinet[/SIZE][/B]

    [url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article3466823.ece?print=yes&randnum=1204464352734[/url]

    Sarah Baxter

    If education is to be Obama’s signature issue, he might consider appointing Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York, as his czar. The billionaire media magnate last week ruled out running for president as an independent and said he would offer his support to whichever candidate [b]took the most nonpartisan approach to America’s problems.[/b] The subtext was clear: “Hire me.”[/QUOTE]


    If Bloomberg does that, he won't support either shrillary or oubama then since both of them are far more partisan than McCain!

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=firehermnow;2405447]Or he could have been just another liberal political hack that the NY Times and CNN think is the 2nd coming. Any word about his "education" in Indonesia in those newspapers?[/QUOTE]

    First of all, the NYT endorsed Hillary Clinton.

    Second of all, do you really think more attention ought to be paid to a thoroughly debunked smear?

    Aren't the huge differences on issues between Obama and McCain enough for you to fixate on?

  15. #15
    [QUOTE=asuusa;2405748]If Bloomberg does that, he won't support either shrillary or oubama then since both of them are far more partisan than McCain![/QUOTE]

    You are misunderstanding what's meant by partisan.

    A partisan is someone who either refuses to or cannot work with the other side. It has nothing to do with how liberal or conservative they are. There are conservative republicans who are not that partisan, and there are moderate democrats who are. It has to do with style more than views.

    In the case of Obama and McCain, both of them have cosponsored significant legislation with members of the other party, occasionally to the chagrin of their own party. In McCain's case, the best example in campaign finance. In Obama's case, he bucked his own party's leadership to lead the bipartisan ethics reform bill through the Senate.

    If you look at the history of senators reaching the white house --and you basically have to go back to LBJ and JFK-- the voting records aren't the best predictor of how partisan/cociliatory the leadership style ultimately proves to be.

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2406495]You are misunderstanding what's meant by partisan.

    A partisan is someone who either refuses to or cannot work with the other side. It has nothing to do with how liberal or conservative they are. There are conservative republicans who are not that partisan, and there are moderate democrats who are. It has to do with style more than views.

    In the case of Obama and McCain, both of them have cosponsored significant legislation with members of the other party, occasionally to the chagrin of their own party. In McCain's case, the best example in campaign finance. In Obama's case, he bucked his own party's leadership to lead the bipartisan ethics reform bill through the Senate.

    If you look at the history of senators reaching the white house --and you basically have to go back to LBJ and JFK-- the voting records aren't the best predictor of how partisan/cociliatory the leadership style ultimately proves to be.[/QUOTE]

    Please leave out the B in LBJ, and the F in JFK. That's racist fear-mongering.

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=shakin318;2406771]Please leave out the B in LBJ, and the F in JFK. That's racist fear-mongering.[/QUOTE]

    :dunce: weak

  18. #18
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    8,129
    exactly

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2406495]You are misunderstanding what's meant by partisan.

    A partisan is someone who either refuses to or cannot work with the other side. It has nothing to do with how liberal or conservative they are. There are conservative republicans who are not that partisan, and there are moderate democrats who are. It has to do with style more than views.

    In the case of Obama and McCain, both of them have cosponsored significant legislation with members of the other party, occasionally to the chagrin of their own party. In McCain's case, the best example in campaign finance. In Obama's case, he bucked his own party's leadership to lead the bipartisan ethics reform bill through the Senate.

    If you look at the history of senators reaching the white house --and you basically have to go back to LBJ and JFK-- the voting records aren't the best predictor of how partisan/cociliatory the leadership style ultimately proves to be.[/QUOTE]

    Voting records have a lot to say about partisanship: they clearly indicate that the more liberal or conservative the Sen is, the more they vote their party line, thus being more partisan.

    Hillary's rank for voting party line is 3rd highest and Obama's is 8th. McCain OTOH is around 60th, so I stand by my statement: that McC is far less partisan than the other two.

  20. #20
    [QUOTE=asuusa;2407156]Voting records have a lot to say about partisanship: they clearly indicate that the more liberal or conservative the Sen is, the more they vote their party line, thus being more partisan.

    Hillary's rank for voting party line is 3rd highest and Obama's is 8th. McCain OTOH is around 60th, so I stand by my statement: that McC is far less partisan than the other two.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, but you quoted Bloomberg earlier, and you are not using the term the same way he did. He has said that he admires both Obama and McCain for their bipartisanship, actually. And I believe their status as frontrunners was why he didn't bother to run.

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