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Thread: How does Darwinism explain the Neanderthals?

  1. #1

    How does Darwinism explain the Neanderthals?

    Serious question, why did Neanderthal man vanish?

  2. #2
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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423621]Serious question, why did Neanderthal man vanish?[/QUOTE]

    They didn't. You can find a sh*tload of them in the mountains between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

  3. #3
    :funnyguy:

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423621]Serious question, why did Neanderthal man vanish?[/QUOTE]

    Survival of the fittest.

    Atlatl.

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;2423676]Survival of the fittest.

    Atlatl.[/QUOTE]

    If we evolved from Apes, how come there are still Apes around? Wouldn't the apes had evolved, too?

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423680]If we evolved from Apes, how come there are still Apes around? Wouldn't the apes had evolved, too?[/QUOTE]

    Ever think maybe they have?

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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423680]If we evolved from Apes, how come there are still Apes around? Wouldn't the apes had evolved, too?[/QUOTE]

    Because apes adapted to the unique environments they inhabit...whereas neanderthal obviously did not.

    Neanderthal was probably killed off by our closer ancestors.

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423680]If we evolved from Apes, how come there are still Apes around? Wouldn't the apes had evolved, too?[/QUOTE]

    Or, perhaps the basis of evolution is apes and humans had a common ancestor.

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    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;2423689]Because apes adapted to the unique environments they inhabit...whereas neanderthal obviously did not.

    Neanderthal was probably killed off by our closer ancestors.[/QUOTE]

    It's believed that the Ice Age and the arrival of modern humans is what most-likely killed them off. The Ice Age dwindled the food supply and modern man created better tools to hunt and capture food.

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423621]Serious question, why did Neanderthal man vanish?[/QUOTE]

    Trying to trace your family tree?

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423621]Serious question, why did Neanderthal man vanish?[/QUOTE]

    Ratings..........their sitcom was horrible..........:D

  12. #12
    [quote=Company_Man;2423680][B]If we evolved from Apes[/B], how come there are still Apes around? Wouldn't the apes had evolved, too?[/quote]

    We didn't evolve from Apes. Humans and Apes each evolved from a common ancestor

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=doggin94it;2423754]We didn't evolve from Apes. Humans and Apes each evolved from a common ancestor[/QUOTE]

    Through natural selection?

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    [QUOTE=Company_Man;2423779]Through natural selection?[/QUOTE]

    No it was God's will.

  15. #15
    Neanderthals haven't vanished and I don't think we should talk about our friends from the Netherlands like this.


    Sincerely,

    GW

    [img]http://www.funfacts.com.au/images/george-w-bush.jpg[/img]

  16. #16
    The most recent theory is that cro-magnon man, the closest hominid to modern humans simultaneous bred with neanderthals and out-competed them. Remember, the key factor driving evolution is simply the ability of one set of genes to survive into the next generation. Both cross-breeding and "survival of the fittest" are means by which one set of genes isn't carried on in the next generation. Neanderthal's initial advantage in physical abilities was eventually over-taken by cro-magnon man's superior cognitive abilities.

  17. #17
    You’re putting the cart before the horse here. What you want to ask is, “Why do extinctions occur and how does evolutionary theory explain such phenomena?”

    Extinctions are typically correlated with population size variance (reproductive potential) and with the extent of population isolations (dispersal ability and species-area relations).

    I don’t know much about hominid ecology and evolution, but I would assume both intraspecific (within species) and interspecific (among species) competition resulted in the death of the Neanderthal.

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    [QUOTE=SanAntonio_JetFan;2423790]Neanderthals haven't vanished and I don't think we should talk about our friends from the Netherlands like this.


    Sincerely,

    GW

    [img]http://www.funfacts.com.au/images/george-w-bush.jpg[/img][/QUOTE]

    LOL

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=finlee17;2423799]You’re putting the cart before the horse here. What you want to ask is, “Why do extinctions occur and how does evolutionary theory explain such phenomena?”

    Extinctions are typically correlated with population size variance (reproductive potential) and with the extent of population isolations (dispersal ability and species-area relations).

    I don’t know much about hominid ecology and evolution, but I would assume both intraspecific (within species) and interspecific (among species) competition resulted in the death of the Neanderthal.[/QUOTE]


    Interesting, thank you.

    How would you describe natural selection?

  20. #20
    Having an ecology background (M.Sc. in Ecology), I usually look at natural selection in terms of adaptedness and population density. The process of natural selection usually leads to an increase in species adaptedness to the environment by increasing per capita survival and reproduction of the carriers of a gene or genotype in a specific environment. Higher population densities of species are usually supported when species become more adapted to their environments. Carry capacity of specific species have been theoretically and empirically proven to evolve to higher levels with density-dependent selection. Naturally there are trade-offs between birth rates and carry capacity in combination with external forces keeping populations below carry capacity.

    However, there isn’t always a strong correlation between adaptedness and natural selection. There is a strong degree of frequency dependence where fitness and adaptedness (i.e., increased population size) to evolve in opposite directions. For example, in predator-prey systems (my background), some genotypes of a predator species have higher prey encounter and capture rates than other genotypes. Theoretically, more efficient and effective search and handling of prey would be favored by Darwinian selection. This would occur despite that fact that it may lead to declines in both prey and predator populations and even the eventual extinction of both.

    In reality, the interactions are complex and prey adapt to top-down pressure exerted by predators. Additionally, intraspecific and interspecific competition limits predator numbers because they compete for limited resources and so on.

    I don’t want to bore people to sleep with basic ecological concepts. So… there is no real easy way to describe evolution through natural selection in one or two sentences. Survival of the fittest doesn’t due justice because the fittest don’t always produce survivable offspring in both absolute and relative terms.

    Asking me to describe natural selection would be equivalent to asking an economist to describe market forces. Very complex phenomena.

    In fact, since I have economics on my mind… a good question would be why do firms go extinct and how does current economic theory explain such phenomena. Considering there are more users with economic backgrounds and who started/own their own businesses than those of us in the sciences, this might be a more fruitful conversation.
    Last edited by finlee17; 03-10-2008 at 01:53 PM.

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