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Thread: Who Is Jeremiah Wright?

  1. #1
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    Who Is Jeremiah Wright?

    If one is going to engage in a hatchet campaign by targeting sound-bites from a sermon, you are at least obligated to consider the whole person somewhere in the process. Personally, I think that Reverend Wright is getting a very bad rap overall. Buzz words like "Goddamn America" get vast over-play because they generate news and controversy, but the truth is that in the context of what Wright was saying, the expression is not nearly so remarkable. He is engaging in the most hallowed tradition of Judaic/Christian practice as a minister... imitation of the prophets like Jeremiah and Amos and Isaiah, who condemned their own people when they strayed, who gave no quarter to "going along with authority" as the equivalent of patriotism when they felt that the covenant with God was being broken. Obama is being risk-aversive by rejecting Wright's more controversial sermons, but I think he has gone further than he has to. Wright is actually doing what really good ministers do: challenge, incite, and empower HIS congregation, HIS community to take charge of their own destiny... the engage in liberation by, as he puts it, "being the subject of their own history, not the objects."
    I include a slice from Wikipedia, just to offer a little more information to assess the man more fairly (whom also has received eight honorary degrees from American Universities... all racism condoners, if we are to believe the Carl Rove machine):

    "Controversial sermons

    During 2008 Presidential campaign, Wright's alleged beliefs and previous remarks became heavily scrutinized, due to his relationship with Democratic Presidential candidate, Barack Obama. Wright had officiated at Obama's marriage, baptized his children, and Obama was a member of the congregation of the Trinity United Church of Christ for over 20 years. Critics have accused Wright of using Black liberation theology to promote black separatism.[11] Wright has rejected this notion by saying that "The African-centered point of view does not assume superiority, nor does it assume separatism. It assumes Africans speaking for themselves as subjects in history, not objects in history."[12]

    Wright once stated that Zionism has an element of "white racism", but the Anti-Defamation League says it has no evidence of any anti-Semitism by Wright.[11]

    In a peace mission that resulted in the freeing of United States Navy pilot Lt. Robert Goodman, who was shot down over Lebanon,[13] [14] Wright traveled to Libya and Syria with Rev. Jesse Jackson and Minister Louis Farrakhan. U.S. President Ronald Reagan welcomed Lt. Goodman at the White House January 4, 1984, hours after he arrived back in the U.S. and said the "mission of mercy" had "earned our gratitude and our admiration." [15] Twenty three years later, Wright was quoted as saying that "When [Obama’s] enemies find out that in 1984 I went to Tripoli to visit Colonel Gadaffi with Farrakhan, a lot of his Jewish support will dry up quicker than a snowball in hell." He added that his trip implied no endorsement of either Louis Farrakhan’s views or Qaddafi’s.[11][16]

    In March 2008, ABC News [17] caused a public uproar by broadcasting spliced sound bites from a sermon that Wright gave shortly after September 11, 2001, in which Wright quoted Edward Peck, [18] former U.S. Chief of Mission in Iraq, former deputy director of the White House Task Force on Terrorism under the Reagan Administration and former U.S. Ambassador to a number of countries, as allegedly having said: "We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye...and now we are indignant, because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought back into our own front yards. America's chickens are coming home to roost." Wright went on state: "Violence begets violence. Hatred begets hatred. And terrorism begets terrorism. A white ambassador said that y’all, not a black militant. Not a reverend who preaches about racism. An ambassador whose eyes are wide open and who is trying to get us to wake up and move away from this dangerous precipice upon which we are now poised. The ambassador said the people we have wounded don’t have the military capability we have. But they do have individuals who are willing to die and take thousands with them. And we need to come to grips with that."[19]

    In other sermons, he said "The government lied about inventing the HIV virus as a means of genocide against people of color", referring to AIDS origins theories, and "The government gives them the drugs [referring to the Iran-Contra Affair][20], builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing 'God Bless America.' No, no, no, God damn America, that's in the Bible for killing innocent people...God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme".[21][22][17]"

  2. #2
    No one wants to rationally discuss Rev. Wright. If the rightwing does that they will lose all of their rightwing magic. You don't discuss in politics anymore you attack and beat the other guy down.

    This new attack on Obama is going to start a new level of scrutinizing politicians' backgrounds.

    It is only going to get uglier on both sides. No one respects anyone when it comes to politics.

  3. #3
    [QUOTE=cr726;2445824]No one wants to rationally discuss Rev. Wright. If the rightwing does that they will lose all of their rightwing magic. You don't discuss in politics anymore you attack and beat the other guy down.

    This new attack on Obama is going to start a new level of scrutinizing politicians' backgrounds.

    It is only going to get uglier on both sides. No one respects anyone when it comes to politics.[/QUOTE]

    You want to "rationally" discuss Rev. Wright? Then show me where HE says he was misquoted/misunderstood/etc.

    I've heard Obama (as well as TONS of posters here) tell me I've misinterpreted his quotes. But to my knolwedge, I've never heard HIM say it.

    I've never heard HIM say that, while he disagrees with some of this country's policies, he still recognizes what a great country it is, and how much progress we've made as a nation in regards to race.

    I've never heard HIM say he disagrees with some of the quotes you are attributing to other people.

    I've never heard HIM say anything American-centered, just African-centered.

    If he's made comments like those, then yes, I will change my mind about him. But all I've heard is OTHER people making excuses for him, which doesn't quite cut it for me . . .:rolleyes:

  4. #4
    Nothing against your post lep but I mean, who cares? Seriously, I'm losing faith in society and quickly.

  5. #5
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    Here's a newletter post from Wright in 2006. The conservative blogger was shocked and amazed at the racism expressed here. Obviously, he didn't even get what it was all about. All he kept seeing was the term "white supremacist" and worrying that it meant him! Wright's comments are quite thoughtful and hardly anything beyond what M.L. King might have said... in effect, inequality is alive and well. I certainly don't agree with everything stated here, but it's a perfectly fair position, if mildly radical.

    Looking Back, Looking Around, Looking Ahead!
    Looking Back

    The month of May each year is the month that I look back to the Brown versus Board of Education decision that was passed in May of 1954. I was twelve years old and anxiously looking forward to turning thirteen that September. The decision meant nothing to me at first because I lived in Philadelphia. Living in Philadelphia meant that I had attended an integrated elementary school, was attending an integrated junior high school and would be attending an integrated high school.

    Because my grandparents lived in Virginia, however, I understood clearly the segregation problem in the South. The Supreme Court decision about the desegregation of public schools, however, made no day-to-day difference in my twelve-year-old world in Philadelphia. I did not understand, therefore, what was really at stake, what was being won and what was being lost in that momentous decision made by the Supreme Court in May of 1954.

    Looking back, however, I have come to learn some very painful lessons about that momentous decision. The first lesson I learned was that desegregation is not the same as integration.

    Desegregation meant that African American children could no longer be denied the right to go to schools that were “For Whites Only.” Desegregation did not mean that white children would now come to Black schools and learn our story, our history, our heritage, our legacy, our beauty and our strength!

    As a matter of fact, across the years that I have been teaching graduate school (since 1975), I have tried to get my students to understand that one of the tragedies about the whole “integration era” was that African Americans did not understand what integration meant. Integration means the coming together of equals to the table.

    Whites, in a culture of white supremacy, however, did not view us as equals and still do not view us as equals; so nothing from our Black or African experience was ever allowed at the table of “integration,” much less invited or asked to be brought to the table.

    Looking back, I saw very early on that many African Americans meant assimilation and acculturation when they used the word “integration.” To integrate, however, does not mean to assimilate or to acculturate!

    Looking back, moreover, I learned the difference between desegregation which was a legal issue (a political issue) and equality which is a spiritual and moral issue. Desegregation had to do with legal access. Giving African American citizens access to quality education, to healthcare, to public facilities, to equal protection under the law was one thing.

    That access, incidentally, is still being blocked. It is being blocked very sophisticatedly, both in the South and in the North (up South!), with attacks upon affirmative action, with the “conservative” agenda and with policies put in place by the Republican Party, which is the Party for the “have mores.”

    Having legal access to schools and public accommodations, however, does not touch the deeper moral “American” problem, which is white supremacy! I owe much of my insights on this issue to Lewis Baldwin.

    Dr. Lewis Baldwin, a professor of African American studies at Vanderbilt University, points out a very important truth in his analysis of George Fredrickson’s monumental work in comparative history. Fredrickson compares the Apartheid in South Africa with the segregation here in the United States of America. Fredrickson’s years of teaching at Northwestern produced two very important works that deal with the comparisons between the Apartheid of South Africa and the “Jim Crow” in America.

    What Dr. Baldwin (a student of Fredrickson’s) does is point out the importance of Fredrickson’s insights. Dr. Fredrickson helps us to see that the real nature of the beast has to do with white supremacy. Baldwin prefers the term white supremacy over “racism” because it is far more accurate in describing what took place in South Africa and what still takes place in South Africa. It is also a term which puts its finger on the pulse of the reality of American thought and American practice!

    “Racism,” in Baldwin’s opinion, is too nebulous a term. It is slippery and has many different meanings for many different people. I have even heard misguided (and ignorant) pundits like Rush Limbaugh and Tom DeLay calling Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney and other Black people racists. I have heard the term “Black racism” and I have also heard the term “reverse racism.”

    [Sic] ideology, the theology, the sociology, the legal structure, the educational system, the healthcare system, and the entire reality of the United States of America and South Africa!

    Twelve years after Nelson Mandela is out of prison and Black South Africans control the legal structure in that country; yet, white supremacy is still in charge. It is “living large and in charge!”

    Black Africans do not control the economic systems, the military or have control over the resources (the diamonds, the oil and the natural resources that were stolen by the whites who took over South Africa), and until that changes, white supremacy will still be in charge!

    White supremacy is not a legal problem. It is a spiritual problem, a psychological problem and a moral problem.

    White supremacy controls the economic system in America, the healthcare system in America and the educational system in America. Hurricane Katrina has pulled the blinders off of all Americans and shown us what white supremacy means at its ugly core and what it has done to the fabric of these “still-yet-to-be-United States” (to use Maya Angelou’s term). That is what I see when looking back during the month of May.

    Looking Around

    Educating our children to the reality of white supremacy becomes crucial for African Americans and for all Americans. Educating our children is a term that I use pointedly. I do not mean “training” our children. That is a part of our problem now.

    The misuse of that term ignores the fact that Africans do not control the military, the police, the legal structure or any of the means to enforce their race prejudice. To try to get misinformed whites and blacks to understand that fact is a waste of time.

    You end up trying to make a blind man see something that he is physically and biologically unable to do. The use of the term “racism,” therefore, makes one enter into an exercise in futility and causes you to come away from that discussion frustrated, angry and wanting to do like Langston Hughes’ Jess B. Semple and smash something!

    The term “white supremacy,” however, is much more accurate. White supremacy undergirds the thought, the order that they might become more rounded and fully productive citizens in this culture and in this country. What we need to do, however, is go beyond training and educate our children!

    We need to educate our children to the reality of white supremacy. We need to educate our children as to the difference between desegregation and equality, the difference between the legal issues and the spiritual issues; and the difference between access in this country as opposed to acceptance in this country!

    We need to educate our children about the white supremacist’s foundations of the educational system, the educational philosophy and the very curricula that immerses them in a culture of white supremacy from kindergarten through graduate school! We need to educate our children how to navigate the dangerous waters that lie ahead of them in this 21st century.

    In navigating the waters, our children need to be aware of the shark-infested waters and the other predators that live in those waters.

    Hurricane Katrina gave us some important images that are analogous to the future that our children have to learn how to navigate. When the levees in Louisiana broke alligators, crocodiles and piranha swam freely through what used to be the streets of New Orleans. That is an analogy that we need to drum into the heads of our African American children (and indeed, all children!).

    In the flood waters of white supremacy that our children have to negotiate economically, educationally, culturally, socially and spiritually, there are not only sharks in those waters, there are also crocodiles, alligators and piranha!

    The policies, with which we live now and against which our children will have to struggle in order to bring about “the beloved community,” are policies shaped by predators. Jesus taught us that white supremacy – or the thinking that any one race is superior to any other race – is against the Will of God, who only created one race, the human race!

    Looking Ahead

    I look back during the month of May to assess the powerful ramifications of the Brown versus Board of Education decision and our misunderstanding of what the full import of that decision meant. I look around to assess where it is we are now in terms of the work that is cut out ahead of us as we educate our children; and I look forward with hope.

    We are on the verge of launching our African-centered Christian school. The dream of that school, which we articulated in 1979, was built on hope. That hope still lives. That school has to have at its core an understanding and assessment of white supremacy as we deconstruct that reality to help our children become all that God created them to be when God made them in God’s own image.

    We teach with hope. It is the same hope which would not let Adam Clayton Powell, Denmark Vesey, Alexander Crummel, Harriet Tubman or Septima Clark give up. It is the same hope which motivated Martin King, Rosa Parks, Samuel DeWitt Proctor, Coretta Scott King, Harry Belafonte and Mary Henderson Wright. I look forward with hope.

    We lay a foundation, deconstructing the household of white supremacy with tools that are not the master’s tools. We lay that foundation with hope. We deconstruct the vicious and demonic ideology of white supremacy with hope. Our hope is not built on faith-based dollars, empty liberal promises or veiled hate-filled preachments of the so-called conservatives. Our hope is built on Him who came in the flesh to set us free.

    Pastor Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr

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    ^:zzz::zzz::zzz:

  7. #7
    Serious question here. Did you have any intent on voting for Obama? If you haven't, then you really don't care to begin with. The people with the biggest problem with Wright are the people who do not want Obama to win the nomination.

    I am still not sure who I am going to vote for and I do not plan on worrying about someone's Rev.

    [QUOTE=OCCH;2446135]You want to "rationally" discuss Rev. Wright? Then show me where HE says he was misquoted/misunderstood/etc.

    I've heard Obama (as well as TONS of posters here) tell me I've misinterpreted his quotes. But to my knolwedge, I've never heard HIM say it.

    I've never heard HIM say that, while he disagrees with some of this country's policies, he still recognizes what a great country it is, and how much progress we've made as a nation in regards to race.

    I've never heard HIM say he disagrees with some of the quotes you are attributing to other people.

    I've never heard HIM say anything American-centered, just African-centered.

    If he's made comments like those, then yes, I will change my mind about him. But all I've heard is OTHER people making excuses for him, which doesn't quite cut it for me . . .:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

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    [QUOTE=manmrmoore;2446314]^:zzz::zzz::zzz:[/QUOTE]

    Precisely. The whole broohaha about Wright is a bunch of nonsense. A waste of space and time... Tell that to Carl Rovette (CBNY) and company...

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=long island leprechaun;2446385]Precisely. The whole broohaha about Wright is a bunch of nonsense. A waste of space and time... Tell that to Carl Rovette (CBNY) and company...[/QUOTE]

    And the point is made. Only people who care are Republicans. Does it matter the level of dislike you have for a candidate? No. They weren't voting for him anyway. so who cares.

    All this does, is possibly, help Satan I mean Clinton anyway...

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=long island leprechaun;2446385]Precisely. The whole broohaha about Wright is a bunch of nonsense. A waste of space and time... Tell that to Carl Rovette (CBNY) and company...[/QUOTE]

    yeh- all you lunatic leftists are correct...

    what would I know?? I mean according to hussien the messiah I'm just a typical white person....:yes:

    [SIZE="1"] long island lunatic to change the topic to Reagan in 5....4....3...2...[/SIZE]
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 03-22-2008 at 06:06 PM.

  11. #11
    Wow! What an original and thoughtful post. I have never heard you refer to people who disagree with you as lunatic leftists or Obama referred to as Hussien and the best one you are just a typical white person.

    You are proof positive that the Rightwing will never learn or change.


    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2446406]yeh- all you lunatic leftists are correct...

    what would I know?? I mean according to hussien the messiah I'm just a typical white person....:yes:

    [SIZE="1"] long island lunatic to change the topic to Reagan in 5....4....3...2...[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

  12. #12
    [QUOTE=cr726;2446417]Wow! What an original and thoughtful post. I have never heard you refer to people who disagree with you as lunatic leftists or Obama referred to as Hussien and the best one you are just a typical white person.

    You are proof positive that the Rightwing will never learn or change.[/QUOTE]

    The Right Wing never change, The Left Wing gets worse every year.

  13. #13
    Both wings are out of touch and out of control.

    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;2446471]The Right Wing never change, The Left Wing gets worse every year.[/QUOTE]

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;2446471]The Right Wing never change, The Left Wing gets worse every year.[/QUOTE]

    lol, I like that

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;2446471]The Right Wing never change, The Left Wing gets worse every year.[/QUOTE]

    :clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper:

    MnJetFan pwns yet another lunatic leftist......

  16. #16
    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2446483]:clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper:

    MnJetFan pwns yet another lunatic leftist......[/QUOTE]

    I don't consider it a ringing endorsement for either side, but whatever

    It does hold water

  17. #17
    I can't believe CBTNY had enough time to post, he is too busy starting Obama threads.

    CBTNY, keep on creating your own reality.

    [QUOTE=HessStation;2446492]I don't consider it a ringing endorsement for either side, but whatever

    It does hold water[/QUOTE]

  18. #18
    [QUOTE=cr726;2446344]Serious question here. Did you have any intent on voting for Obama? If you haven't, then you really don't care to begin with. The people with the biggest problem with Wright are the people who do not want Obama to win the nomination.

    I am still not sure who I am going to vote for and I do not plan on worrying about someone's Rev.[/QUOTE]

    I openly admit there is NO CHANCE of me voting for either democratic candidate (which is about the only reason McCain is getting my vote!)

    There are way to many issues I do not agree with either dem on, regardless of this race issue.

    Unfortunately, just b/c I don't plan on voting for the guy doesn't mean he may not be MY president some day. Which means I DO have to care about issues like this.

    I assume you'd agree that middle class white guys are not at the top of ANY democrats priority list, so if there's a candidate that appears even MORE "against" me, I'd like to know that ahead of time, and try to get it out in the open.

    Not saying he's racist, but if Wright's views affected him AT ALL (even subconsciously), then I think I have every right to be concerned.:(

  19. #19
    the middle class is not a priority for either party. The priority is raising money. You need cash to become the President.

    Rev. Wright has a problem with just about everyone, listen to some of the other things he has said and you would think he was a Republican.

    [QUOTE=OCCH;2446528]I openly admit there is NO CHANCE of me voting for either democratic candidate (which is about the only reason McCain is getting my vote!)

    There are way to many issues I do not agree with either dem on, regardless of this race issue.

    Unfortunately, just b/c I don't plan on voting for the guy doesn't mean he may not be MY president some day. Which means I DO have to care about issues like this.

    I assume you'd agree that middle class white guys are not at the top of ANY democrats priority list, so if there's a candidate that appears even MORE "against" me, I'd like to know that ahead of time, and try to get it out in the open.

    Not saying he's racist, but if Wright's views affected him AT ALL (even subconsciously), then I think I have every right to be concerned.:([/QUOTE]

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=OCCH;2446528]I openly admit there is NO CHANCE of me voting for either democratic candidate (which is about the only reason McCain is getting my vote!)

    There are way to many issues I do not agree with either dem on, regardless of this race issue.

    Unfortunately, just b/c I don't plan on voting for the guy doesn't mean he may not be MY president some day. Which means I DO have to care about issues like this.

    I assume you'd agree that middle class white guys are not at the top of ANY democrats priority list, so if there's a candidate that appears even MORE "against" me, I'd like to know that ahead of time, and try to get it out in the open.

    Not saying he's racist, but if Wright's views affected him AT ALL (even subconsciously), then I think I have every right to be concerned.:([/QUOTE]

    That's a strange comment about middle class white guys... there hasn't been a presidential candidate who focused on middle class AMERICAN white guys for as long as I can remember. We simply are not relevant when it comes to lobbying forces. Maybe we need to create a lobby and start asserting ourselves....

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