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Thread: oh, yeh- Al-Sadr's throwing his hands up....again

  1. #1
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    oh, yeh- Al-Sadr's throwing his hands up....again

    [QUOTE][B]Al-Sadr Offers to Stop Fighting if Government Halts Raids, Frees Prisoners; Iraq Welcomes MoveThe Associated Press BAGHDAD Mar 30, 2008 (AP) [/B]

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr is offering to pull his fighters off the streets of Basra and other cities if the government halts raids against his followers and releases prisoners held without charge.

    The offer is contained in a nine-point statement issued by his headquarters in Najaf.

    Al-Sadr is demanding that the government issue a general amnesty and release all detainees. The statement said he also "disavows" anyone who carries weapons and targets government institutions, charities and political party offices.

    There was no immediate comment from the government.

    Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


    [/QUOTE]


    [url]http://www.abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=4552139[/url]
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 03-30-2008 at 09:35 AM.

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456131][url]http://www.abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=4552139[/url][/QUOTE]

    Spoken like someone who has no understanding of the matter at hand.

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    [QUOTE=kennyo7;2456137]Spoken like someone who has no understanding of the matter at hand.[/QUOTE]

    spoken like a true liberal ready to throw their hands up and blame others the second things get a little tough.....

    this is the strategy of Hamas, terrorists you defended in another thread- get your ass kicked, call for a truce, then re-arm....
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 03-30-2008 at 09:48 AM.

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    looks like mookie can't hang once the going gets a little rough...

    [QUOTE][B]Iraqi Shia Cleric Moqtada Sadr Orders Fighters Off Streets
    March 30, 2008 9:15 a.m. EST [/B]

    Linda Young - AHN Editor
    Baghdad, Iraq (AHN) - In a surprise move Iraqi Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr on Sunday ordered his fighters off the streets of Basra and other cities in Iraq.

    Sadr said in a statement that his movement wanted the Iraqi people to stop the bloodshed and for Iraq to maintain its independence and stability. He had previously defied the Iraqi government's deadline to turn weapons in for cash.

    According to reports, it is unclear if all of Sadr's followers will comply with his order.

    According to reports, the United States has used ground troops in Basra.

    Sadr's order comes after fighting across the country since Tuesday alone had killed more than 240 people.

    [/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7010482614[/url]

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456141]spoken like a true liberal ready to throw their hands up and blame others the second things get a little tough.....

    this is the strategy of Hamas, terrorists you defended in another thread- get your ass kicked, call for a truce, then re-arm....[/QUOTE]

    You really have no understanding of the matter.
    For starters are you aware that the heraleded Iraqi Army had an incredible number of desertions and subordinations because they refused to fight the Madhi Army. This was so bad that the USA and England had to be pulled into the fight. Al-Sadr is a smart man. He knows his militia is no match for the USA and England. SO he is backing down. In addition , al-Sadr knows that Iran will support the ruling Dawa/SCIRI in an all out war. So the smart thing to do is back down and live to fight another day . But this is an incredibly bad showing for the Iraqi Army and Government. They have serious problems . What the last weeks showed is al-Sadr is still in controll of the Madhi Army (despite Americas belief that he ran away in hiding in Iran) but even more importantly that he has a stronghold in popularity in the oil-rich south. Malikis govt is in major trouble.

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    [url]http://www.daralhayat.com/arab_news/levant_news/03-2008/Item-20080329-fc1e0f12-c0a8-10ed-017c-432452067bcf/story.html[/url]


    I kno w you dont speak Arabic. But take a look at this picture. Its of deserting Iraqi Forces turning their weapons over to the Madhi Army. This is very telling.

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    [QUOTE=kennyo7;2456162][url]http://www.daralhayat.com/arab_news/levant_news/03-2008/Item-20080329-fc1e0f12-c0a8-10ed-017c-432452067bcf/story.html[/url]


    I kno w you dont speak Arabic. But take a look at this picture. Its of deserting Iraqi Forces turning their weapons over to the Madhi Army. This is very telling.[/QUOTE]

    take a look at this picture...it is of an American solider the taliban claimed to hold hostage...

    [IMG]http://www.synthstuff.com/mt/archives/captured-gi-joe-1.jpg[/IMG]

    very telling.....:rolleyes:

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456168]take a look at this picture...it is of an American solider the taliban claimed to hold hostage...

    [IMG]http://www.synthstuff.com/mt/archives/captured-gi-joe-1.jpg[/IMG]

    very telling.....:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    Uhhh. The Iraqi govt was reporting that there was a large number of defections b/c they refused to fight the Madhi Army. Thats why they asked the American's to intervene. Nice try though.

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    [QUOTE][B]Expert: Current Iraq fighting not good guys vs bad[/B]

    Iraqi Mahdi Army fighters take position during clashes in the southern city of Bara on March 26, 2008. (Photo: ESSAM AL-SUDANI/AFP/Getty Images)

    by Frank James

    The battles raging in southern Iraq's Basra are more than a central Iraqi government trying to assert control over the militia of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Instead, it's more complicated, more like a mini civil war between competing Shiite groups vying for power.

    This is the take of [B]Anthony Cordesman[/B], the insightful national security analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

    Cordesman urges those trying to understand the current turmoil in Basra and elsewhere to [B]avoid oversimplifying the current fighting into a good guys versus bad guys dynamic.[/B] In the analysis below, Cordesman refers to the Jaish al Mahdi, or JAM, also known as the Mahdi Army, which is al-Sadr's group and the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq led by Shiite cleric Abul Azziz al-Hakim


    [B]Much of the current coverage of the fighting in the south assumes that Muqtada al-Sadr and the Sadr militia are the "spoilers," or bad guys, and that the government forces are the legitimate side and bringing order. This can be a dangerous oversimplification. There is no question that many elements of the JAM have been guilty of sectarian cleansing, and that the Sadr movement in general is hostile to the US and is seeking to enhance Muqtada al-Sadr's political power. There is also no doubt that the extreme rogue elements in the JAM have continued acts of violence in spite of the ceasefire, and that some have ties to Iran. No one should romanticize the Sadr movement, understate the risks it presents, or ignore the actions of the extreme elements of the JAM.

    But no one should romanticize Maliki, Al Dawa, or the Hakim faction/ISCI. The current fighting is as much a power struggle for control of the south, and the Shi'ite parts of Baghdad and the rest of the country, as an effort to establish central government authority and legitimate rule.

    The nature of this power struggle was all too clear during a recent visit to Iraq. ISCI had de facto control over the Shi'ite governorates in the south, and was steadily expanding its influence and sometimes control over the Iraqi police. It was clearly positioning itself for power struggle with Sadr and for any elections to come. It also was positioning itself to support Hakim's call for a nine governorate Shi'ite federation -- a call that it had clear Iranian support.

    The US teams we talked to also made it clear that these appointments by the central government had no real popular base. If local and provincial elections were held with open lists, it was likely that ISCI and Dawa would lose most elections because they are seen as having failed to bring development and government services. [/B]



    There was no real debate over how bad the overall governance of the south was at the provincial level, how poor the flow of capital was from the central government in Baghdad, and how poor government-related services were even in Shi'ite areas. As recent ABC polls show, incompetence and corruption are not sectarian. The south may be more secure, but Shi'ites only receive marginally better treatment from the central government than Sunnis.

    Members of the US team differed over how much the Sadrists had a populist base and broad support among the poor Shi'ite Iraqis in the south, and how well the Sadrists could do in any provincial and local elections, although most felt Sadr still had a broad base of support in Baghdad. One of the key uncertainties that emerged during visits to the south was over how elections would shape up when there were no real political parties operating with local leaders, and in a framework of past national elections that only allowed Iraqis to vote for entire lists (most with many totally unfamiliar names) for the main parties and that made no allowance for the direct election of members of the COR that represented a given area or district. Optimists hope for a populist upswell; realists foresee an uncertain mess.

    [B]There were also differences over how much Sadr was waiting out the effort to defeat Al Qa'ida before allowing the JAM to become active again, and how much he was repositioning himself to strengthen his political and religious position for a more normal political life. In practice, he may be doing both, may be as confused by the uncertain nature of Iraqi politics and security as everyone else, and may be dealing with a movement so fractured and diverse that effective control of even its mainstream is difficult to impossible.[/B]
    It was also clear that Basra was a special case. The British position had essentially eroded to the point of hiding in the airport. There was a fair amount of bluster about joint planning, training, and patrols, but little evidence of substance. Moreover, the power struggle in Basra differed sharply from the struggle in the other Shi'ite provinces. Basra was essentially divided up among Shi'ite party mafias, each of which had its own form of extortion and corruption. They sometimes fought and feuded, but had a crude modus vivendi at the expense of the rest of the nation. Basra also had far more Iranian penetration in both the civil and security sectors than the other Shi'ite governorates. However, it was clear that Iran and the Al Quds force continued to be equal opportunity supporters of all the Shi'ite militias, and that Iran effectively was ensuring that it would support the winner, regardless of who the winner was.

    This does not mean that the central government should not reassert control of Basra. It is not peaceful, it is a significant prize as a port and the key to Iraq's oil exports, and gang rule is no substitute for legitimate government. But it is far from clear that what is happening is now directed at serving the nation's interest versus that of ISCI and Al Dawa in the power struggle to come. It is equally far from clear that the transfer of security responsibility to Iraqi forces in the south is not being used by Maliki, Al Dawa, and ISCI to cement control over the Shi'ite regions at Sadr's expense and at the expense of any potential local political leaders and movements. Certainly, the fact that these efforts come after ISCI's removal of its objections to the Provincial Powers Act may not be entirely coincidental.

    Is the end result going to be good or bad? It is very difficult to tell. If the JAM and Sadr turn on the US, or if the current ISCI/Dawa power grab fails, then Shi'ite on Shi'ite violence could become far more severe. It is also far from clear that if the two religious-exile parties win, this is going to serve the cause of political accommodation or legitimate local and provincial government. It seems far more likely that even the best case outcome is going be one that favors Iraqracy over democracy.


    [B]This is the complicated internecine conflict U.S. military forces still find themselves refereeing as the conflict enters its sixth year. As Cordesman suggests, the best case scenario may be a governing arrangement that doesn't resemble anything like the kind of democracy Americans are accustomed to. [/B]

    But that would be far superior in the eyes of many Americans to the worst-case scenario, which would be the Shiite militias turning their weapons once again on U.S. forces.
    [url]http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/politics/blog/2008/03/expert_current_iraq_fighting_n.html[/url]



    [/QUOTE]

    CBNY, try to understand. This is alot more complicated than the silly statements you make.

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456168]take a look at this picture...it is of an American solider the taliban claimed to hold hostage...

    [IMG]http://www.synthstuff.com/mt/archives/captured-gi-joe-1.jpg[/IMG]

    very telling.....:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    Here's CBNY, when he's not posting on JI Politics Forum.... :D

    [IMG]http://static.pyzam.com/img/funnypics/animals/gumby.jpg[/IMG]

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    [QUOTE=long island leprechaun;2456203]Here's CBNY, when he's not posting on JI Politics Forum.... :D

    [IMG]http://static.pyzam.com/img/funnypics/animals/gumby.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]

    seems you've forgotten to take your medication once again....:(
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 03-30-2008 at 12:35 PM.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=kennyo7;2456185]CBNY, try to understand. This is alot more complicated than the silly statements you make.[/QUOTE]

    versus the lame attempts to, as usual, defend the bad guys??

    [QUOTE][B]Al-Sadr calls off fighting amid airstrikes, crackdown
    Published: 3/30/08, 12:00 PM EDT[/B]

    BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) - Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr told his followers to stop fighting and to cooperate with Iraqi security forces Sunday, as U.S. and Iraqi forces targeted his Mehdi Army in Basra and Baghdad.

    In exchange for brokering the cease-fire, al-Sadr demanded that the government give his supporters amnesty and release any of his followers that are being held.

    The nine-point statement was issued by his headquarters in Najaf and came a day after al-Sadr told his fighters not to surrender their weapons.

    "We announce our disavowal from anyone who carries weapons and targets government institutions, charities and political party offices," said the Sunday statement that was distributed across the country and posted on Web sites linked to al-Sadr's movement.

    The government welcomes al-Sadr's statement and views it as "positive and responsive," spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh said.

    "A large number of people will listen to Muqtada al-Sadr's call. Life will return to all of Iraq as before," the spokesman said. "We as the government of Iraq believe this effort will be in the common interest and help the security efforts that the government is working to achieve."

    Whether the two sides negotiated the cease-fire is disputed.

    Al-Dabbagh said the Iraqi government did not meet with Mehdi Army representatives.

    However, Sheikh Salah al-Obaidi, a top aide to al-Sadr, said representatives of the militia met with the government in Najaf on Saturday night, the first negotiations since the government announced a crackdown on "outlaws" in Basra last week.

    U.S. forces targeted the cleric's Shiite militia in Baghdad as well, launching airstrikes that killed 15 people Sunday in neighborhoods known to be Mehdi Army strongholds, an Interior Ministry official said.

    Two airstrikes in the Sadr City neighborhood killed nine people and wounded 14 others, and another strike in the al-Zuhor neighborhood, in northeastern Baghdad, killed six people and wounded 14 others, an Interior Ministry official said.

    The U.S. military said it killed 11 militants in those same areas Saturday.

    The Baghdad bombings came as Iraqi authorities extended indefinitely a strict curfew on the capital and as fighting between government troops and Shiite militants stretched into its sixth day, leaving about 400 people dead, according to reports from U.S. and Iraqi officials.

    In Basra, part of southern Iraq's Shiite heartland, at least 200 people have been killed and 500 wounded in battles since Tuesday, a high-ranking security official said.

    Authorities there extended a ban on pedestrian and vehicle traffic just hours before the curfew was to expire Sunday morning.

    Before al-Sadr issued the call to halt fighting, Al-Maliki compared the outlaws, on whom the government is cracking down, to al Qaeda and said troops would not leave Basra "until security is restored."

    "We will continue to stand up to these gangs in every inch of Iraq," he said. "It is unfortunate that we used to use say these very words about al Qaeda, when all the while, there were people among us who are worse than al Qaeda."

    Al-Maliki met Saturday in Basra with area tribal leaders and other prominent figures, who expressed support for the government's effort to "save Basra from criminal gangs," according to a statement from the prime minister's office.

    The prime minister further said that militants had until April 8 to surrender their weapons in a guns-for-cash program.

    On Saturday, supporters of al-Sadr said they were being unfairly singled out in the crackdown, and the cleric told his followers not to hand over their arms "except to a state that can throw out the occupation," al-Obaidi said.

    Other developments

    • The U.S. military said Sunday it found a mass grave with 14 bodies near Muqdadiya. The bodies, which showed signs of torture, appeared to have been in the grave for two to six months. They were found just 100 yards from where 37 bodies were found buried Thursday, the military said.

    • The International Zone -- where where many Iraqi government buildings and embassies are located -- was targeted Sunday by rockets or mortars, a U.S. Embassy official said, but no injuries or damage were immediately reported.

    [/QUOTE]

    [url]http://my.att.net/s/editorial.dll?pnum=1&bfromind=7405&eeid=5785291&_sitecat=1181&dcatid=0&eetype=article&render=y&ac=-2&ck=&ch=ne&rg=blsadstrgt[/url]

    yeh it's complicated....mookie wants to fight on his terms and once he begins to get his ass kicked he calls for a timeout....

    yeh its' silly....the leftist, many who claimed the surge was a failure before it even started, continue to reach for reasons to further their agenda...

    speaking of which, has anyone heard from Harry Reid (Worst. American. Ever.) lately????

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456342]versus the lame attempts to, as usual, defend the bad guys??



    [url]http://my.att.net/s/editorial.dll?pnum=1&bfromind=7405&eeid=5785291&_sitecat=1181&dcatid=0&eetype=article&render=y&ac=-2&ck=&ch=ne&rg=blsadstrgt[/url]

    yeh it's complicated....mookie wants to fight on his terms and once he begins to get his ass kicked he calls for a timeout....

    yeh its' silly....the leftist, many who claimed the surge was a failure before it even started, continue to reach for reasons to further their agenda...

    speaking of which, has anyone heard from Harry Reid (Worst. American. Ever.) lately????[/QUOTE]

    Defending the bad guys? Who are the bad guys? Who are the good guys? Seems like we are defending a man (Maliki) who openly welcomed with open arms and red carpet the leader of a nation we consider the bad guys (Iran)? Things are very complicated in Iraq. Its not as simple as good guy vs. bad guy. I suggest before making more of a fool out of yourself you take the time and learn about these people and their history. Your embarassing yourself with such ignorant posts.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456342]versus the lame attempts to, as usual, defend the bad guys??



    [url]http://my.att.net/s/editorial.dll?pnum=1&bfromind=7405&eeid=5785291&_sitecat=1181&dcatid=0&eetype=article&render=y&ac=-2&ck=&ch=ne&rg=blsadstrgt[/url]

    yeh it's complicated....mookie wants to fight on his terms and once he begins to get his ass kicked he calls for a timeout....

    yeh its' silly....the leftist, many who claimed the surge was a failure before it even started, continue to reach for reasons to further their agenda...

    speaking of which, has anyone heard from Harry Reid (Worst. American. Ever.) lately????[/QUOTE]

    Come on CB, the libs tell us violence doesn't work. For every one of these idiots we kill, 20 more take their place. We need to talk to these guys. Learn to understand them. We need to get them on Dr. Phil's couch.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=DeanPatsFan;2456352]Come on CB, the libs tell us violence doesn't work. For every one of these idiots we kill, 20 more take their place. We need to talk to these guys. Learn to understand them. We need to get them on Dr. Phil's couch.[/QUOTE]

    No, you are right. We should continue to blindly support a govt that welcomes our enemy with open arms and calls them a great friend and ally

  16. #16
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    funny...even a liberal mouthpiece such as the NYSlimes admits mookie is desperate and compares him to nothing more than a mafia thug...

    I'm sure some of the libs on this board can enlighten us....:rolleyes:

    [QUOTE]In [B]This Shiite Battle, a Marked Shift From the Past
    By SABRINA TAVERNISE and SOLOMON MOORE
    Published: March 30, 2008[/B]

    The most intense fighting in Iraq in months had the ring of the familiar. Another battle against followers of a rebel Shiite cleric. Fighting in the south that spread to other cities.

    But as the week came to a close, it was clear that the current fighting in the southern city of Basra and the clashes in Baghdad had some fundamental differences from the battles in Najaf and Baghdad that plagued the American military in 2004.

    For starters, the Shiite rebels are fighting mainly Iraqi soldiers, rather than Americans. Their leader, Moktada al-Sadr, is not defending against attacks from a redoubt inside the country’s most sacred shrine, but is issuing edicts with a tarnished reputation from an undisclosed location, possibly outside the country. And Iraq’s prime minister, a Shiite whom Americans had all but despaired would ever act against militias of his own sect, is taking them on fiercely.

    The differences represent a shift in the war, whose early years were punctuated by uprisings against Americans by a vast, devoted group of Mr. Sadr’s followers, who were largely respected by Shiites. As their tactics veered into protection rackets, oil smuggling and other scams, Mr. Sadr’s followers too began to resemble mafia toughs more than religious warriors, splintering and forming their own gangs and networks, many beyond Mr. Sadr’s direct control.

    Even some Sadrists seemed to understand the toll their methods were taking on their popular appeal, which has become increasingly important as provincial elections draw near.

    “We are interested in civic issues more than military issues,” Said Harith al-Ethani, a Sadr representative in Basra, said in February. “We are helping with blood donations; we are providing volunteers for the hospitals; we are handing out gas and food rations,” he continued, sounding more like an old political machine operative than a religious insurgent.

    But while Mr. Ethani was offering up the Mahdi Army, Mr. Sadr’s militia, as a kind of Iraqi Salvation Army, Basra residents were groaning under daily assassinations and kidnappings and a wholesale policy of intimidation. By the time the fighting started in Basra on Tuesday, that discontent had spread to a large swath of Iraqi society — including some of its largely Shiite army and police. The shift opened up a space for Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki to move against the Mahdi Army. And while it is far from clear that his effort will succeed — reports of soldier and police surrenders abound — the mere fact that he is trying is new.

    Mr. Maliki’s motives are mixed. He wants to take back Basra, a city that has some of the country’s biggest oil revenues, which for years have fed violent Shiite gangs, a portion of them associated with Mr. Sadr. But Mr. Maliki’s strongest backer is the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq, a Shiite political party that rivals Mr. Sadr’s and would like nothing better than to see him weakened before the coming provincial elections.

    He also risks losing face within his increasingly discontented coalition and with the Iraqi public, which deeply distrust the United States and could see Mr. Maliki as its lackey. The move could as well antagonize Iran, which is an influential sponsor of many of the southern Shiite groups.

    Still, a strong note of support for Mr. Maliki’s actions could be heard in the words of some Iraqis interviewed this week, who cast his success as crucial to the future of their country.

    “If Mahdi Army wins this war, that means Iraqi will be destroyed,” said a Shiite businessman from Baghdad. “That means Moktada will be president and it will be a stick in the eye of the Americans. It will be a religious country, an extreme country.”

    The Mahdi Army’s image is considerably changed from 2004, when its members were seen as Shiite Robin Hoods, protecting undefended neighborhoods, helping distribute cooking gas, and standing up to what many Shiites saw as an act of American aggression, when tanks rolled into Sadr City, a Shiite neighborhood in Baghdad. But during the sectarian violence and terror of the ensuing years, the militia began breaking down into a patchwork of groups, some involved in death squads, others in theft and corruption.

    A Western official with knowledge of Iraq’s security forces said the current situation differed from earlier stand-offs because the Iraqi Army finally has the resources to take on the militiamen.

    The official said Mr. Sadr’s followers “overplayed their hand” and may have fatally damaged his credibility. Mr. Sadr’s lack of control, the official said, has forced Mr. Maliki to act, and to act decisively.

    “The militia was indifferent to the cease-fire. They didn’t do what Sadr told them to do, to hold peaceful demonstrations only and no attacks,” he said. “They just didn’t do that, and they’re making him look like he’s out of control.”

    “Maliki miscalculated,” said a senior Western official in Baghdad who spoke on condition of anonymity. The official said Iraqi generals had no intention of starting such a wide-scale operation that would last even 48 hours. “From all I hear, Maliki’s trip was not intended to be the start of major combat operations right there, but a show of force.”

    “There were some heated exchanges between him and the generals, who out of hurt pride or out of calculation or both then insisted on him taking responsibility,” the official said.

    He added that as Mr. Maliki and Mr. Sadr battle in Basra, it is the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq that may emerge the victor.

    “The hope is that the fighting is reinforcing the image of the Sadrists as irresponsible, radical, violent,” the official said.

    In any case, Mr. Maliki has closely, and repeatedly, tied his personal reputation to the assault’s success, vowing that he will see the fight through until the Sadrists are driven out. That would be a different result from past clashes, which often ended in negotiated compromises but no real resolution. But an all-out battle carries its own risk.

    A former political adviser to the American military in Baghdad, Matthew Sherman, cautioned that the conflict could easily lead to a situation similar to that in Lebanon in 2006, when Hezbollah claimed victory in a war of perceptions against Israel even after a bombing campaign had weakened it militarily. “The Sadrists will likely view their survival as victory,” he said.

    “Is it really possible to completely eliminate the Sadrists?” he said. “They are not going to go away or be beaten by military means alone.”

    [/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/world/middleeast/30assess.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&hp[/url]

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    For all you people that complain that the NY Times news division is biased please point out the bias in the article CB quoted above on Iraq. I would like to hear it.

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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456336]seems you've forgotten to take your medication once again....:([/QUOTE]

    No, I just thought your comparison was "ass"inine...;)

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=long island leprechaun;2456777]No, I just thought your comparison was "ass"inine...;)[/QUOTE]

    another thought provoking post on the topic at hand.....:rolleyes:

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;2456815]another thought provoking post on the topic at hand.....:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, along with your Taliban doll. Really relevant. Geez, look in the mirror sometimes....:rolleyes:

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