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Thread: Question for McCain supporters

  1. #1
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    Question for McCain supporters

    Is anyone here really excited about McCain, other than the facts that 1) he's a GOP, and 2) he's not Obama?

    So far, I've heard very little talk about McCain specifically. It seems that when McCain supporters talk about their choice to vote for him, it usually begins with
    "Because Obama......... (no experience, will raise taxes etc etc.)"

    What do you like about McCain? Can you tell me without even mentioning Obama, libs, my views etc?

    For instance, I like Obama because he has been against this war from day one. Plenty of democrats changed their status for fear of looking unpatriotic after 9/11.

    He's an excellent communicator. Seems to be a very bright guy. I look at how he has run his campaign, it's organized and they have plenty of money left.
    I believe the way a candidate runs his campaign will tell how he runs the country. I'm impressed with his debating. He has been unflappable, stayed calm, and hasn't resorted to too many cliches. I like that he hasn't given the easy answers, claiming that we can and will fix everything. He has come across as honest.

    What do you like about McCain? If you talk about his experience, be specific
    what you like about it.

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    Honestly, the more I watch McCain, and now the Palin debacle, I'm begginning to think the repubs want nothing to do with winning this election.

    The republican brand is in the crapper, what better way to rejuvenate it then to watch a dem controlled house, congress and WH struggle through the next 4 years due to this economic mess?

    I think it's a longshot that anybody would have a successful presidency given what we are facing now, so why not only offer token resistance and let the other team take it over just when it's about to implode.

    Sorry if this is hijacking the thread a bit, but I guess I would answer that as a typical republican voter I don't see much of anything to get excited about either McCain or Palin, hence my thoughts above

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    [QUOTE=CTM;2794881]Honestly, the more I watch McCain, and now the Palin debacle, I'm begginning to think the repubs want nothing to do with winning this election.

    The republican brand is in the crapper, what better way to rejuvenate it then to watch a dem controlled house, congress and WH struggle through the next 4 years due to this economic mess?

    I think it's a longshot that anybody would have a successful presidency given what we are facing now, so why not only offer token resistance and let the other team take it over just when it's about to implode.

    Sorry if this is hijacking the thread a bit, but I guess I would answer that as a typical republican voter I don't see much of anything to get excited about either McCain or Palin, hence my thoughts above[/QUOTE]


    I would agree 100% including the believe that the republicans never thought they would have a chance so they threw McCain a bone with the nomination with an eye toward 2012.

    The only reason left to vote for McCain is the Supreme Court. While he wouldn't propose the most conservative justices, I think Obama will be Pelosi/Reid's puppet in proposing frighteningly liberal judges who want to re-write the constitution ala Ruth Bader-Ginsburg.

    Not much, and maybe not even enough. I am considering voting third party so the republicans get a message that they have lost fiscal conservatives like me.(although I know they won't get the message).

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    [QUOTE=Piper;2794906]I would agree 100% including the believe that the republicans never thought they would have a chance so they threw McCain a bone with the nomination with an eye toward 2012.

    The only reason left to vote for McCain is the Supreme Court. While he wouldn't propose the most conservative justices, I think Obama will be Pelosi/Reid's puppet in proposing frighteningly liberal judges who want to re-write the constitution ala Ruth Bader-Ginsburg.

    [B]Not much, and maybe not even enough. I am considering voting third party so the republicans get a message that they have lost fiscal conservatives like me.(although I know they won't get the message).[/B][/QUOTE]

    I'd hope they would get the message if enough people did it. They'd have to. The problem is that voting for Barr isn't exactly exciting, I imagine many will just not vote rather then make a statement vote.

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    [QUOTE=Piper;2794906]
    The only reason left to vote for McCain is the Supreme Court. While he wouldn't propose the most conservative justices, I think Obama will be Pelosi/Reid's puppet in proposing frighteningly liberal judges who want to re-write the constitution ala Ruth Bader-Ginsburg.

    [/QUOTE]

    Although not exactly what I asked for, this is certainly a very legitimate reason to vote for McCain. I really can't see any other reason.

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    [QUOTE=Timmy-y-y-y;2794928]Although not exactly what I asked for, this is certainly a very legitimate reason to vote for McCain. I really can't see any other reason.[/QUOTE]

    Sorry, it's all I got.

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    I trust John McCain. I trust he is going to work for the greater good, and not simply to undo perceived injustices. He's has not been nor will he be afraid to change his mind and modify his stance on issues that matter.

    Obama is riding a wave of leftist euphoria. He has been ordained by the ministers of the media as the great deliverer of equality, justice and income redistribution. Well, we'll see how that works out.

    My one hope is that Obama is forced by the economic crisis and a looming showdown with Russia to take the role seriously and not leave us with another Bush or Carter administration...riddled with half-baked grandiosities.

    John McCain won't hesitate to tackle these issues head-on and work across party lines to get things done.

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    I found McCain disappointing last night, before he put me to sleep.

    I'll be honest my vote is a vote against Obama.

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    I liked McCain in 2000, before he became a partisan yes-man.

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    [QUOTE=CTM;2794927]I'd hope they would get the message if enough people did it. They'd have to. The problem is that voting for Barr isn't exactly exciting, I imagine many will just not vote rather then make a statement vote.[/QUOTE]

    Economic conservatives need to take back the GOP from the social conservatives. Reagan was a social conservative who kept the view private and governed like an economic conservative. That was how he was able to argue that the Republican party was the "big tent."

    Right now, it seems that the social conservatives run the show. McCain would have been a good economic conservative, but had to cater to the social conservative base and chose the new Queen of that faction, Gov. Sarah Palin.

    Obama is ahead right now by every metric. If there is no game changing event and Obama loses, it would appear that the mudslinging of this last month took effect. The social conservatives are happy to win by the politics of hate, hopefully the economic conservatives will change that course.

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=psalty14;2794936]I trust John McCain. I trust he is going to work for the greater good, and not simply to undo perceived injustices. He's has not been nor will he be afraid to change his mind and modify his stance on issues that matter. [/QUOTE]

    I said specifics

    [QUOTE=psalty14;2794936]Obama is riding a wave of leftist euphoria. [/QUOTE]

    Read the instructions please


    [B][SIZE="5"]Fail[/SIZE][/B]

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=psalty14;2794936]I trust John McCain. I trust he is going to work for the greater good, and not simply to undo perceived injustices. [B]He's has not been nor will he be afraid to change his mind and modify his stance on issues that matter[/B].[/QUOTE]

    Did you vote for Bush in '04, because Kerry was a "flip-flopper"?

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    [QUOTE=SMC;2794952]Economic conservatives need to take back the GOP from the social conservatives. Reagan was a social conservative who kept the view private and governed like an economic conservative. That was how he was able to argue that the Republican party was the "big tent."

    Right now, it seems that the social conservatives run the show. McCain would have been a good economic conservative, but had to cater to the social conservative base and chose the new Queen of that faction, Gov. Sarah Palin.

    Obama is ahead right now by every metric. If there is no game changing event and Obama loses, it would appear that the mudslinging of this last month took effect. The social conservatives are happy to win by the politics of hate, hopefully the economic conservatives will change that course.[/QUOTE]
    Good post. We need to take back the party or splinter it

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=Big L;2794961]Did you vote for Bush in '04, because Kerry was a "flip-flopper"?[/QUOTE]

    People didn't vote against Kerry because he was a flip-flopper. They voted against him because all Kerry did was take everything that people didn't like about Bush and created his fake platform out of it. It was a pathetic attempt to try to get all the anti bush votes from people that don't know any better or have a real understanding of the issues.

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    [QUOTE=CTM;2795003]Good post. We need to take back the party or splinter it[/QUOTE]

    Thanks.

    It's like the Log Cabin Republicans. You've heard about them? They are a long standing, staunch economic conservative political group made up of homosexuals who were law makers, CEOs, etc. They came into prominence with Reagan's "big tent" philosophy.

    We don't hear much of them now. Why? Because the social conservatives hate them. Plus, if any of them vote for McCain I would not understand it since their own party hates them.

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    I've always liked McCain. He was a true military man, which I think is (besides being admirable) important when you are president. He's lived through the horrors of war, so he's more likely to expend every option before resorting to it.

    But the thing I really liked the most was he wasn't afraid to ruffle feathers in his own party. Until recently he didn't always tow the party line, which I applaud because it shows he has a mind of his own and isn't just a yes-man.

    However, I got turned off by his recent tactics to appease the party. It goes against everything I liked about him.

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    [QUOTE=Illinois Jets Fan;2794947]I liked McCain in 2000, before he became a partisan yes-man.[/QUOTE]

    Agreed. What McCain has become is almost a parody of his work in 2000. He gave in to the big machine after nearly having to bow out so early in the primaries.

    But I'll still tell you what I like about him. He has a history of middle ground, bi-partisan work in an area of our government where that is severely lacking. Most Senators either avoid it or do it for their own selfish reasons... and I'm not talking about just voting with the other side, he actually works so that both sides are represented in a bill. Sometimes this works, other times it doesn't.

    He is strong on national security and wants states to choose on divisive issues such as abortion/gay marriage. I don't particularly agree with that but I respect it and I believe it's a good first step. Though his campaign has made it a joke, he has fought corruption on both sides. Unfortunately, one man in the middle can't do much when politics is ruled on it's side. My hope is that if he can somehow pull it out (very doubtful), he will return to form.

  18. #18
    [QUOTE=SMC;2795015]Thanks.

    It's like the Log Cabin Republicans. You've heard about them? They are a long standing, staunch economic conservative political group made up of homosexuals who were law makers, CEOs, etc. They came into prominence with Reagan's "big tent" philosophy.

    We don't hear much of them now. Why? Because the social conservatives hate them. Plus, if any of them vote for McCain I would not understand it since their own party hates them.[/QUOTE]


    The Reagan myth continues. He held sway, when he was awake, over the most corrupt administration in history. More people associated with his admin were arrested , charged, and convicted of mischief than any other administration ever. He is the darling of conservative talkers who have succeeded in something no adversary in our history was able to do. They have turned the people against their government and they should be ashamed.

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=SMC;2795015]Thanks.

    It's like the Log Cabin Republicans. You've heard about them? They are a long standing, staunch economic conservative political group made up of homosexuals who were law makers, CEOs, etc. They came into prominence with Reagan's "big tent" philosophy.

    We don't hear much of them now. Why? Because the social conservatives hate them. Plus, if any of them vote for McCain I would not understand it since their own party hates them.[/QUOTE]

    It was actually Bob Dole who brought the "big tent" into the GOP lexicon. GWB modified this into "compassionate conservatism."

    Reagan's record on gay rights was weak. He worked very hard --and very successfully-- to court the religious right, and being anti-gay rights was the cost of doing business, particularly when it came to acting against AIDS when it was understood to be a gay-only syndrome.

    Reagan himself was very tolerant of gay people, and had lots of gay friends coming out of Hollywood and all. But he didn't govern that way.

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    [QUOTE=edndot;2795040]The Reagan myth continues. He held sway, when he was awake, over the most corrupt administration in history. More people associated with his admin were arrested , charged, and convicted of mischief than any other administration ever. He is the darling of conservative talkers who have succeeded in something no adversary in our history was able to do. They have turned the people against their government and they should be ashamed.[/QUOTE]

    You're joking, right?

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