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Thread: More cabinet names:Gates, Pritzker, Napolitano

  1. #1

    More cabinet names:Gates, Pritzker, Napolitano

    Looks like Gates is gonna be staying at Defense, according to folks who apparently know. I am thrilled about this, as the guy is obviously good at a crucial job that we've seen all-too-recently what happens when its held by someone who isn't.

    [url]http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1108/15807.html[/url]

    Looks like Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano will be running Homeland Security.

    [url]http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1108/15815.html[/url]

    And Hyatt chairwoman Penny Pritzker is going to be the pick for Commerce Secretary.

    [url]http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2008/11/obama-pritzker.html[/url]

  2. #2
    Napolitano for Homeland Security? That's interesting. She may be a governor of a border state, but considering our problems with illegal immigration, that's not necessarily a good thing.

  3. #3
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871630]Napolitano for Homeland Security? That's interesting. She may be a governor of a border state, but considering our problems with illegal immigration, that's not necessarily a good thing.[/QUOTE]

    Tom Ridge, the first head of DHS, was also a governor (of a non border state).

    It's a weird job, because its not so much about running the various entities --FBI, CIA, coordinating with the various armed forces, law enforcement-- as it is about coordinating them. You want somebody with management skills in that job. Napolitano reportedly has those in spades.

  4. #4
    So the list thus far is:

    Chief of Staff: Rohm Emanual
    Secretary of State: Hillary Clinton (Possible)
    Attorney General: Eric Holder
    Health & HS: Tom Daschle
    Defense: Gates (Holdover)
    Homeland Sec: Janet Nepolitano (possible)
    Commerce: Penny Pritzker (possible)

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2871641]Tom Ridge, the first head of DHS, was also a governor (of a non border state).

    It's a weird job, because its not so much about running the various entities --FBI, CIA, coordinating with the various armed forces, law enforcement-- as it is about coordinating them. You want somebody with management skills in that job. Napolitano reportedly has those in spades.[/QUOTE]

    The only reason I brought up her governorship is because Arizona is one of the main states where all of the illegal border jumping occurs. I wonder if her responsibilities were similar as the AZ Gov., in coordinating local law enforcement and dealing with the federal government in her state.

    This was also one of main knocks on McCain whenever he talked about immigration policy, FWIW.

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=Warfish;2871647]So the list thus far is:

    Chief of Staff: Rahm Emanual
    Secretary of State: Hillary Clinton (Possible)
    Attorney General: Eric Holder
    Health & HS: Tom Daschle
    Defense: Gates (Holdover)
    Homeland Sec: Janet Nepolitano (possible)
    Commerce: Penny Pritzker (possible)[/QUOTE]

    CoS isn't a cabinet job, but yup.

    A few other senior staff-level appointments as well...

    Senior adviser: Valerie Jarrett
    [url]http://voices.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/11/14/valerie_jarrett_named_white_ho.html[/url]

    Press Secretary: Robert Gibbs

    Budget Director: Peter Orszag
    [url]http://marcambinder.theatlantic.com/archives/2008/11/obama_wants_orszag_at_omb.php[/url]

    Senior Advisor: David Axelrod
    WH Counsel: Greg Craig
    Cabinet Secretay: Chris Lu
    Staff Secretary (this is the John Podesta/Harriet Miers job): Lisa Brown

    [url]http://hotlineblog.nationaljournal.com/archives/2008/11/axelrod_brown_c.html[/url]

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871652]The only reason I brought up her governorship is because Arizona is one of the main states where all of the illegal border jumping occurs. I wonder if her responsibilities were similar as the AZ Gov., in coordinating local law enforcement and dealing with the federal government in her state.

    This was also one of main knocks on McCain whenever he talked about immigration policy, FWIW.[/QUOTE]

    I hope your not expecting immigration enforcement to play a big role for teh Obama Administration Paul. I think you'll be very dissapointed if you are.

    We better just get used to the idea of unfettered illegal immigration along with policies that offer (effectively) amnesty for those illegals (with very minor penalties), likely combined with minimal-to-nonexistant enforcement for those who chose not to even pay/suffer the minor penalties.

    Is what it is. No sense getting pissed about it now, the poeple spoke, and Obamnesty is who they wanted overwhelmingly.

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2871658]CoS isn't a cabinet job, but yup.

    A few other senior staff-level appointments as well...

    Senior adviser: Valerie Jarrett
    [url]http://voices.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/11/14/valerie_jarrett_named_white_ho.html[/url]

    Press Secretary: Robert Gibbs

    Budget Director: Peter Orszag
    [url]http://marcambinder.theatlantic.com/archives/2008/11/obama_wants_orszag_at_omb.php[/url]

    Senior Advisor: David Axelrod
    WH Counsel: Greg Craig
    Cabinet Secretay: Chris Lu
    Staff Secretary (this is the John Podesta/Harriet Miers job): Lisa Brown

    [url]http://hotlineblog.nationaljournal.com/archives/2008/11/axelrod_brown_c.html[/url][/QUOTE]

    Aye, we'll have to do a full list somplace eventually.

    So Nuu, will we hear the same "Axelrod is an evil genius behind Obama" we always heard about Rove? ;)

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871652]The only reason I brought up her governorship is because Arizona is one of the main states where all of the illegal border jumping occurs. I wonder if her responsibilities were similar as the AZ Gov., in coordinating local law enforcement and dealing with the federal government in her state.

    This was also one of main knocks on McCain whenever he talked about immigration policy, FWIW.[/QUOTE]

    Yup. I believe she was the first gov to send her national guard troops to the border, although she's not seen as a hard liner on immigration by any means.

    [QUOTE]t Front Line of Immigration Debate
    Ariz. Governor Favors Tough Enforcement But Humane Treatment
    By John Pomfret
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Sunday, June 25, 2006; Page A03

    PHOENIX -- Two decades ago, lawyer Janet Napolitano represented a Tucson church battling an investigation into whether it smuggled illegal immigrants into the United States from Central America. In 1990, a federal appeals court ruled the Immigration and Naturalization Service could not send undercover informants into the Southside Presbyterian Church services on mere fishing expeditions to try to gather intelligence.

    Over the next 20 years, Napolitano served as U.S. attorney for Arizona, as the state's attorney general and, since 2002, as governor. Now Napolitano's old clients view her as a defector, in the words of John Fife, the former pastor of Southside Presbyterian, who led what was called the sanctuary movement for illegal immigrants.

    THE IMMIGRATION DEBATE
    The Washington Post's coverage of the immigration issue, from the politics of revising the nation's immigration laws to the impact of illegal immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border and the Washington region.


    The U.S.-Mexico border is at the forefront of a growing debate over U.S. immigration and border security reform.

    [B]Among the nation's top Democrats, Napolitano has developed some of the toughest policies against illegal immigration. She was one of the first major politicians to call for deployment of the National Guard along the border and declared a state of emergency in her state's counties nearest Mexico. She has aggressively pursued smugglers in Arizona. In February, she joined with Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. (R) to outline a plan for immigration reform that called for more funding for border security, more visas for foreign workers and no blanket amnesty for illegal immigrants.

    Her Republican critics here, however, say she has not gone nearly far enough and has routinely blocked legislative efforts against illegal immigration.[/B]

    Napolitano's transformation from crusading lawyer to a tough-minded governor is reflective of the political reality of Arizona, which, more than any other state, has become the battleground for what the nation should do about illegal immigration. And her too-tough for some, not-tough-enough for others stance reflects the political difficulties the issue presents here.

    In Arizona's congressional delegation, conservative Republican J.D. Hayworth of Scottsdale wants to place troops on the Mexican border, while liberal Democrat Raul M. Grijalva of Tucson favors granting citizenship to many illegal immigrants. In Maricopa County around Phoenix, the sheriff has begun arresting suspected illegal immigrants on smuggling charges, while to the south in Pima County, the school superintendent is defying a state order to reveal how many children of illegal immigrants are in the school district.

    "We've got all kinds here," said Robin Hoover, head of Humane Borders, a Tucson-based interfaith organization devoted to stopping deaths among illegal immigrants as they cross the desert. "We've got people who all say they want to save America -- and they're fighting like cats and dogs."

    At the center of the debate is Napolitano, a native New Yorker raised in Albuquerque, who is running for reelection. Despite being a Democrat in a state where the legislature is controlled by Republicans, she boasts an approval rating of 60 percent. Napolitano was on Sen. John F. Kerry's list of possible running mates in 2004, and, in 2005, Time magazine named her one of the nation's five best governors.

    "My challenge is to devise a policy that makes Arizonans confident that some things are being done," Napolitano said, "without going overboard and just throwing money at the problem to make it look like I'm 'tough,' whatever that means."

    Despite sharing a 350-mile-long border with Mexico, Arizona was not always a frontline state in the immigration debate. For decades, California and Texas bore the brunt of illegal immigration through San Diego and El Paso. In the mid-1990s, the Clinton administration built walls and launched enforcement efforts around both cities, and the illegal flow shifted to Arizona's deserts. Federal authorities promised a similar enforcement program for Arizona, Napolitano said, but it never happened.

    "The thing was allowed to fester and fester and fester," Napolitano said. "Not only did the traffic move to Arizona, but it was left untended by the feds for so long, you had this growing public frustration and perception that control of the border in Arizona had been lost."

    Napolitano said her views on immigration began to change during her tenure as U.S. attorney in the mid-1990s with the crush of immigrant smuggling cases.

    Ruth Ann Myers, who led the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Arizona from the days when Napolitano was battling her agency in court through the beginning of Napolitano's tenure as U.S. attorney, recalled Napolitano's transformation. "As U.S. attorney," Myers said, "she was very enforcement-minded."

    In recent years, the Border Patrol estimated that more than 6,650 people were attempting to cross into Arizona from Mexico every day and an estimated 4,000 were succeeding. The state's hospitals were routinely handing out tens of millions of dollars in free medical care to ailing illegal immigrants, according to state data, and the Medicaid bill ballooned from $200 million in 2001 to $1.2 billion in 2003, at least partly because of illegal immigration.

    While toughening her stance on the border, Napolitano has also opposed what she terms "inhumane" restrictions on illegal immigrants. In 2004, Arizonans passed Proposition 200, which directed the state to stop all non-federally mandated assistance to illegal immigrants. Since then, Arizona's attorney general, with Napolitano's support, has ruled that the law only pertains to discretionary state programs and not to federally funded entitlements such as food stamps and subsidized school lunches. The proposition's backers have sued the state to demand what they call full implementation. Meanwhile, on Thursday, the legislature voted to let voters decide whether to deny more state services, such as state-funded child care, to illegal immigrants, and whether to make English the state's official language. Napolitano opposes both measures.

    "This governor has dragged her feet and tried to stop all improvement and changes with respect to illegal immigration problems within the state," charged Randy Pullen, a Republican activist who was among those suing Napolitano. "She talks a great story, but she believes in open borders. Every time we try to get something done, she vetoes it."

    These days, Napolitano finds herself back in the position of a gadfly to the feds -- the same feds she sued 20 years ago and then led, as U.S. attorney, in the 1990s. Napolitano says she was forced to take a tougher stance on immigration because she, like many state politicians in the West, believes "our federal immigration policy is broken." Still, she blasted the idea of simply increasing border security without a comprehensive solution that involves Mexico and new regulations on visas and employers.

    "We're not going to seal the border; we can't," she said, referring to vast stretches of forbidding desert. "When I hear congressional and media people saying, 'Shut the border,' I think to myself, 'They've never seen the border.' You can't possibly have been to the Arizona-Mexico border and believe that is possible."[/QUOTE]

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=Warfish;2871662]I hope your not expecting immigration enforcement to play a big role for teh Obama Administration Paul. I think you'll be very dissapointed if you are.

    We better just get used to the idea of unfettered illegal immigration along with policies that offer (effectively) amnesty for those illegals (with very minor penalties), likely combined with minimal-to-nonexistant enforcement for those who chose not to even pay/suffer the minor penalties.

    Is what it is. No sense getting pissed about it now, the poeple spoke, and Obamnesty is who they wanted overwhelmingly.[/QUOTE]

    It's a joke. For me, this was one of the biggest issues heading into the election season last year, and it was virtually ignored by both candidates. Very disappointing.

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871668]It's a joke. For me, this was one of the biggest issues heading into the election season last year, and it was virtually ignored by both candidates. Very disappointing.[/QUOTE]

    Don't buy into Nuu's hype/propaganda. Napolitiano wasn't and isn't "tough" on illegal immigration, and she will very much be an enabler for teh standard Democrat Party Line of Amnesty and No Enforcement. Guaranteed.

  12. #12
    [QUOTE=Warfish;2871663]Aye, we'll have to do a full list somplace eventually.

    So Nuu, will we hear the same "Axelrod is an evil genius behind Obama" we always heard about Rove? ;)[/QUOTE]

    Warfish, maybe you can sticky a thread with an informal list of all appointments as they come in? It could be a one-stop place where we can post rumors and news as it develops.

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=Warfish;2871663]Aye, we'll have to do a full list somplace eventually.

    So Nuu, will we hear the same "Axelrod is an evil genius behind Obama" we always heard about Rove? ;)[/QUOTE]

    Will we hear it? Absolutely.

    (It may be less persuasive, however, because Obama doesn't come across like a dimwitted child easily manipulated by the grownups around him.)

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=Warfish;2871671]Don't buy into Nuu's hype/propaganda. Napolitiano wasn't and isn't "tough" on illegal immigration, and she will very much be an enabler for teh standard Democrat Party Line of Amnesty and No Enforcement. Guaranteed.[/QUOTE]

    Sheesh. I wrote she "was not a hard liner by any means," but that she was the first governor to send national guard troops to her border. Both true, no?

  15. #15
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871668]It's a joke. For me, this was one of the biggest issues heading into the election season last year, and it was virtually ignored by both candidates. Very disappointing.[/QUOTE]

    This happened because McCain didn't want to remind his base about his support of immigration reform, which Obama also supported. So there wasn't really anything for the two of them to argue about.

  16. #16
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2871684]This happened because McCain didn't want to remind his base about his support of immigration reform, which Obama also supported. So there wasn't really anything for the two of them to argue about.[/QUOTE]

    Immigration is the one thing that was going to get ignored by the next president it didnt matter who won the election.

  17. #17
    [QUOTE=Jetfan_Johnny;2871831]Immigration is the one thing that was going to get ignored by the next president it didnt matter who won the election.[/QUOTE]

    Well, as it happens, the crappy economy seems to have temporarily solved this problem. Fewer illegals are coming and many are actually leaving because the building jobs they were coming for have evaporated.

    The lull might be an opportunity to do something good on border security, but its hard to imagine it being an early priority given what else is on the agenda right now.

  18. #18
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2871844]Well, as it happens, the crappy economy seems to have temporarily solved this problem. Fewer illegals are coming and many are actually leaving because the building jobs they were coming for have evaporated.

    [/QUOTE]

    I'd like to see hard stats on that. It sounds good in theory, but somehow I really doubt that.

    And that doesn't solve the problem of the millions of illegals already in this country.

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=pauliec;2871851]I'd like to see hard stats on that. It sounds good in theory, but somehow I really doubt that.

    And that doesn't solve the problem of the millions of illegals already in this country.[/QUOTE]

    I've read it a few places. Mostly andecdote-driven stories like this one...

    [url]http://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/news/pompano_beach/sfl-flbgoinghome1116pnnov16,0,5631786.story[/url]

    I also heard a radio interview with Chertooff (current DHS head) who said illegal immigration was down as well, although he cited the enforcement efforts more than the economy.

  20. #20
    [QUOTE=nuu faaola;2871867]I've read it a few places. Mostly andecdote-driven stories like this one...

    [url]http://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/news/pompano_beach/sfl-flbgoinghome1116pnnov16,0,5631786.story[/url]

    I also heard a radio interview with Chertooff (current DHS head) who said illegal immigration was down as well, although he cited the enforcement efforts more than the economy.[/QUOTE]

    Well, I have my own anecdotal evidence. Everyday I drive past the train station and there are just as many Mexicans, if not more so than usual, hanging around, bothering people, looking for work to do. Same thing outside Home Depot.

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