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Thread: Commentary: Good planets are hard to find (CNN.com)

  1. #1

    Commentary: Good planets are hard to find (CNN.com)

    [QUOTE]Commentary: Good planets are hard to find

    By Larry J. Schweiger
    Special to CNN

    Editor's Note: Larry Schweiger is President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Wildlife Federation. The federation is a nonprofit organization that seeks to protect wildlife habitats and advocate for solutions to global warming.

    (CNN) -- Nature can be amazingly resilient, capable of adapting to constantly changing ecological conditions. And yet, this resiliency is limited and rapidly reaching the breaking point.

    In the lifetime of a child born today, 20 percent to 30 percent of the world's plant and animal species will be on the brink of extinction -- in part because of global warming -- if we fail to act.

    Like it or not, global warming is the defining issue of the 21st Century. Climate scientists have issued warnings that we must act now to curb emissions of heat-trapping gases that cause global warming.

    Dr. James Hansen of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has warned that the next two years are a "last chance" to act before we tip our climate system too far out of balance, creating a fundamentally "different planet."

    Unchecked, we are heading to a full-blown climate crisis as the planet encounters several key tipping points including:

    • Widespread damage to forests caused by expanded wildfire and insect infestation. A four-fold increase in the number of forest fires and a six-fold expansion of acres burned in the Western United States has been linked to global warming and drier conditions. Fires in Russia last summer consumed 29 million acres. Insect infestations have killed millions of acres of forests in North America as larvae increasingly survive warmer winters.

    • Persistent drought. By the 2020s, 75 to 250 million people in Africa risk losing access to clean water, and some African countries are expected to see a 50 percent decline in crop yields.

    • Flooding caused by rising sea levels will put hundreds of millions of people, including many Americans, at risk.

    The acceleration of the Arctic ice melt is a powerful warning that we are rapidly running out of time. The last two summers have seen dramatic, record-shattering declines in the Arctic ice cap.

    Not too long ago, scientists were concerned that global warming could completely melt the Arctic ice cap within a century. Today, some scientists are predicting that this may happen in five years. Polar bears are drowning and other sea life is struggling with the decline of Arctic ice.

    Arctic ice melt presents multiple dangers, including the release of methane. Vast quantities of methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide, are stored in permafrost.

    Melting of even a small fraction of this permafrost -- on land or the ocean floor -- and the subsequent release of methane could cause a runaway greenhouse effect. Scientists recently documented openings in the Arctic Ocean sea floor off the Siberian coast where millions of tons of methane are escaping.

    This rapid ice melt is now creating an international fight for the oil that lies beneath the ice. The irony of this should not be lost. Oil is a top culprit in polluting our atmosphere with heat-trapping gases. Rather than fighting for more of the very resource that has created this climate crisis, countries should be working together to do everything possible to prevent further melting.

    Fortunately, America is ready to act. President-elect Barack Obama has stated that we are entering "a new chapter in America's leadership on climate change." He recognizes the economic opportunity to create jobs and reduce our dependency on oil by investing in the clean energy technologies that will safeguard our planet.

    We need a green shovel to dig our way out of our economic hole. The investments in clean energy that forestall a climate meltdown will aid our recovery from the global financial meltdown.

    Overwhelming numbers of Americans are ready. According to election polling, more than three-quarters of voters are demanding a shift toward clean energy in order to revitalize America's economy.

    And yet, the clean energy revolution will not be a sufficient response to the climate crisis. We must also protect the nature of tomorrow in the face of this threat. Safeguarding wildlife and protecting natural resources in a warming world requires bold approaches to natural resource management that will transform the way we approach wildlife conservation.

    The eyes of the world are upon America and what we do this coming year. In 2009, we need to enact a federal program to promptly cap and reduce the pollution causing global warming at the pace scientists tell us is needed. We must use the financial resources from this program to invest in clean energy technologies, safeguard America's natural resources and protect communities from the threats of a destabilized climate.

    With renewed U.S. leadership, we can secure an effective global agreement on climate change that engages every nation around the world in the effort to protect our planet, and ourselves.

    Conflicts over natural resources are accelerating, and we must address the imperative of balancing human needs with the natural world. We can no longer afford to separate the two -- we all depend on healthy natural resources for the food we eat, the water we drink, the houses we build -- no matter where we live.

    After all, we have only one planet. And good planets are hard to find.[/QUOTE]

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Commentary in Response

    [url]http://www.fff.org/freedom/fd0808g.asp[/url]

    Global Warming, Central Planning, and the Free Market
    by Bart Frazier, Posted November 26, 2008

    Global warming is a topic that can turn any gathering of friends into a shouting match quickly, and with good reason. If the direst predictions are true, our civilization is in for a rough ride down the road. But unfortunately, the debate over global warming has been framed in such a way that one of the best options to either stop global warming or alleviate its consequences has been left out — to let the market guide the decisions of those it affects.

    There is a good chance that global warming is occurring. Many, but certainly not all, scientists now agree that the planet is heating up, but important questions remain unanswered. Assuming that the planet is warming, is human activity the cause and, if so, what can and should be done about it?

    Climate change is par for the course in the history of planet Earth. Even schoolchildren know that long ago, vast glaciers of ice stretched over much of our planet, gouging out valleys and fjords, drastically altering the landscape. At one time the sea level was 300 feet lower than it is today, and it is even theorized that the entire planet was covered by ice during the Cryogenian period more than 630 million years ago.

    Of course, the planet has a history of getting hot as well. The most dramatic example is known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. About 55 million years ago, it is estimated that the average global temperature rose about 6 degrees centigrade over the course of 20,000 years. For the most part, ice did not even exist on the planet at that time.

    There were other less dramatic temperature increases in the history of our planet, but the point is that climate change is a naturally occurring phenomenon with the Earth cooling some of the time and warming at others. It has changed in the past, and it is going to change in the future, with or without us.

    Why would all of this matter to a libertarian? Because proposals are being made in governments around the world that will dramatically affect our well-being and our liberty. The greenhouse effect theorizes that man-made gases, particularly CO2, will trap solar heat within our atmosphere and thus raise global temperatures. The seemingly logical way to stop global warming then would be to mandate a reduction in CO2 output. Governments would tell factories how much CO2 they could emit, tell auto manufacturers how polluting cars could be, ban certain types of products from the marketplace, et cetera.

    But there are several problems with this approach.

    What if government officials are wrong? The greenhouse effect makes very good theoretical sense, and there is some evidence that global temperatures are rising. There is also some evidence that temperatures are not rising, but let’s assume that they are. What if this temperature rise is due to natural causes? Global temperatures have fluctuated wildly in the past and there is no evidence that the process has ceased. Water vapor, volcanic activity, animals, and the sun itself contribute to the effects of global warming far more than humans do. And at this point in history, we simply cannot differentiate natural temperature changes from those that are man-made. The draconian and expensive solutions being proposed may be aimed at a naturally occurring phenomenon.

    If global warming is man-made and human activity is the cause of rising temperatures, rising sea levels, et cetera, the cost to curtail greenhouse gas emissions cannot possibly justify the action. One of the most compelling arguments that proponents of emissions control have is that the poor who cannot afford to cope with climate change will suffer horribly. But what will happen to the poor of the world in places such as India and China that are currently modernizing their countries? For the first time, literally billions of people are making gargantuan leaps in living standards. Many still do not live well by Western standards, and burdening their economies with emission limits would throw their societies back into squalor. Are we to take away the tools they are using to get out of poverty and subsistence living just when they are breaking out of it? They have more or less embraced free-market ideas, and just at the time they are starting to reap the rewards they are to be cast back into poverty so that the world can save the poor. It makes no sense.

    A loss of liberty

    But the most important reason for saying no to emissions control is to maintain our liberty. Emissions control means people control. Right now, the discussion is revolving around industrial emissions. Power plants, factories, and the like will be forced to curb their gas emissions. Forcing business owners to run their plants by state edict is bad enough, but once it is acknowledged as a justifiable action against global warming, emissions control will lead to much harsher regulations.

    It sounds alarmist, but we have seen it in the past. The second-hand-smoke crusade is a recent example. Some health experts began to think that second-hand smoke caused health problems in nonsmokers, and a movement to create nonsmoking areas in restaurants emerged. Civil libertarians voiced concerns that once nonsmoking areas were established, there would be a push to ban smoking outright. They were dismissed as Chicken Littles, but in the end, they were proved right. Smoking has been banned outright in bars and restaurants in several states, and some counties have even attempted to ban smoking outdoors.

    The audacity of the people who called for the controls is enough to make your blood boil, but it proves that you can’t give them an inch, because they will take a mile. The same goes for global warming. In the name of saving the planet, they will destroy the vestiges of individual liberty.

    It would be easy for much liberty to be lost if the greenhouse crusaders were to get everything they wanted. Almost every human activity contributes to greenhouse gas emissions. Cows contribute to global warming more than cars do. Will hamburgers be outlawed? Will it be illegal to cut down trees on our property because they help combat global warming? The government in California has proposed giving the state control of home air-conditioning systems to control energy use. Even assuming that the worst predictions of catastrophe from global warming are true, it does not make sense to try to stop it — the monetary costs of doing so would be astronomical and the loss of liberty could not be tolerated. A much better approach would be to let people cope with the change instead of trying to halt it.

    There is no better way to tackle the problems of global warming than by letting the free market operate. People can tackle problems best when they are free to make decisions without restrictions from the state. By dictating how people run their lives and their businesses, the state chokes the entrepreneurial spirit of a society and limits the alternative solutions that might have been available for a given problem but were snuffed out before they ever came into existence. That holds true both for dealing with the consequences of global warming and in developing technology that contributes less to the effect.

    If government would just stay out of the way, humanity would not need to be coerced into helping those affected by disasters caused by global warming. The response to the Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004 and Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans should be testament to the power of private charity. The first help into New Orleans came from Wal-Mart while FEMA was busy in Atlanta training volunteers about sexual harassment.

    And not only would the free market deal with catastrophe better than a central plan, it would also encourage ways to live more in harmony with the environment. The market is already doing this. There now exist markets for solar and wind power sources, cleaner cars, organic foods, recycled containers, and countless other products that were not even a possibility 100 years ago.

    Think of what it was like 500 years ago. Plumbing was almost nonexistent. We burned trees for fuel or cut them up to make homes. Our transportation was defecating in the streets.

    We now heat our homes in an immensely cleaner fashion. There is now more forest in Vermont than there was 100 years ago. Natural gas is incomparably cleaner than energy obtained from burning wood and coal. Who could have predicted the natural gas furnace 100 years ago? Who could have foreseen the advent of hybrid vehicles? The free market has ways to alleviate social ills in the future in ways that are utterly inconceivable to us now.

    Let us give environmentalists the benefit of the doubt and assume that their intentions are good. Such being the case, their arguments should be given careful attention. After all, worst-case scenarios for global warming involve a tremendous amount of change on our planet, and it is the goal of everyone to try to deal with it in the best way possible.

    Let the market operate, both in curtailing greenhouse gases and in alleviating the damage done. It is the most efficient option, and it is the moral option.

  3. #3
    ill give you the words of our new Energy Secretary

    [quote]
    The next secretary of energy, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Steven Chu, recently compared the danger of climate change to a problem with electrical wiring in a house.

    Suppose, he said, you had a small electrical fire at home and a structural engineer told you there was a 50 percent chance your house would burn down in the next few years unless you spent $20,000 to fix faulty wiring.

    "You can either continue to shop for additional evaluations until you find the one engineer in 1,000 who is willing to give you the answer you want -- 'your family is not in danger' -- or you can change the wiring," Chu said in a presentation in September.
    [/quote]

    and

    [quote]
    ...people who said they were uncertain whether climate change is being caused by humans were "reminiscent of the dialogue in the 1950s and '60s on tobacco." (At that time, many argued that there was insufficient evidence linking smoking to cancer.)
    [/quote]


    [url]http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/11/AR2008121103380.html[/url]
    Last edited by bitonti; 12-12-2008 at 02:59 PM.

  4. #4
    Anyone want to comment on the UN study that showed the world is cooling?

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=bitonti;2906762]ill give you the words of our new Treasury Secretary



    and




    [url]http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/11/AR2008121103380.html[/url][/QUOTE]Except, you don't know that spending the money will FIX the problem. That's the vast difference between the two situations.

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2906819]Except, you don't know that spending the money will FIX the problem. That's the vast difference between the two situations.[/QUOTE]

    Its not that different, if we invest in cleaner energy we automatically get cleaner air (for breathing) and a shot to finally cut off the horrible regimes of the middle-east and elsewhere. If we save ourselves from a global catastrophe...Bonus!

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=fukushimajin;2906852]Its not that different, if we invest in cleaner energy we automatically get cleaner air (for breathing) and a shot to finally cut off the horrible regimes of the middle-east and elsewhere. If we save ourselves from a global catastrophe...Bonus![/QUOTE]

    I'm all about that -- but through choice, not force.

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2906857]I'm all about that -- but through choice, not force.[/QUOTE]

    You think the utilities, oil companies, coal mining operations, their employees and the hundreds of thousands of ancillary employees that feed off those industries are going to let us "chose" the time when they disappear? This will take some forcing -- a strong push at least -- from government. Ultimately if you want to make large-scale changes its the only game in town.

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=fukushimajin;2906873]You think the utilities, oil companies, coal mining operations, their employees and the hundreds of thousands of ancillary employees that feed off those industries are going to let us "chose" the time when they disappear? This will take some forcing -- a strong push at least -- from government. Ultimately if you want to make large-scale changes its the only game in town.[/QUOTE]I can choose to be greener if I want to.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2906879]I can choose to be greener if I want to.[/QUOTE]

    Individual (even aggregated) consumer behavior based on conscience has absolutely no effect on overall environmental/economic conditions. Policy works, its just that we haven't had any on this issue for over 40 years.

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=fukushimajin;2907051]Individual (even aggregated) consumer behavior based on conscience has absolutely no effect on overall environmental/economic conditions. Policy works, its just that we haven't had any on this issue for over 40 years.[/QUOTE]

    Wow. I can't even... wow.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=fukushimajin;2906873]You think the utilities, oil companies, coal mining operations, their employees and the hundreds of thousands of ancillary employees that feed off those industries are going to let us "chose" the time when they disappear? This will take some forcing -- a strong push at least -- from government. Ultimately if you want to make large-scale changes its the only game in town.[/QUOTE]

    I'm not worried. The invisible hand will take care of it. I'm not worried, even if the invisible hand is missing a few fingers, arthritic, and covered with a rash from a poor diet and connected to a madman who forgot to take his medications. I believe in miracles.

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=long island leprechaun;2907405]I'm not worried. The invisible hand will take care of it. I'm not worried, even if the invisible hand is missing a few fingers, arthritic, and covered with a rash from a poor diet and connected to a madman who forgot to take his medications. I believe in miracles.[/QUOTE]

    We have an invisible hand?

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2906819]Except, you don't know that spending the money will FIX the problem. That's the vast difference between the two situations.[/QUOTE]
    That, and we’re talking about costs unthinkably larger than $20K; some costs which can’t even be measured in money which I think is a major point of the article Vilma posted. If you had a 50% chance your house would burn down, sure most people would take out a loan, fork over the $20K and not take the chance. But hell, I might have to take my chances with the faulty wiring if the alternative is $20M out of my pocket.

  15. #15
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    I think the arguement that the earth was warmer by 6 degrees 55 million years ago - so what? is a bogus arguement. Not that it wasn't warmer.

    6 degrees of change over millions of years gives time to adapt. 6 degrees over 200 years like we're seeing now is different. Comparing past climate records to the rapid temp. rise seen today is like comparing the proverbial apples to oranges.

  16. #16
    [QUOTE=Big L;2907424]I think the arguement that the earth was warmer by 6 degrees 55 million years ago - so what? is a bogus arguement. Not that it wasn't warmer.

    6 degrees of change over millions of years gives time to adapt. 6 degrees over 200 years like we're seeing now is different. Comparing past climate records to the rapid temp. rise seen today is like comparing the proverbial apples to oranges.[/QUOTE]

    Don't forget that UN reports only matter if they confirm your opinions. The recent report that shows the world has been cooling has not received any coverage.

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2907416]We have an invisible hand?[/QUOTE]

    If we did, I'd want to know what the other one was doing....;)

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2907438]Don't forget that UN reports only matter if they confirm your opinions. The recent report that shows the world has been cooling has not received any coverage.[/QUOTE]

    A small dip doesn't mean an upward trend is over. Ever look at a stock chart?

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=BrooklynBound;2906819]Except, you don't know that spending the money will FIX the problem. That's the vast difference between the two situations.[/QUOTE]

    I said Treasury Secretary, I meant ENERGY secretary.

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