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Thread: OT: Any Beer brewers out there?

  1. #21
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    [QUOTE=Brewman13;2981218]Been brewing for about 8 years, all grain the last 3. Can be very time consuming but most work is in clean up. You might want to do an IPA for your first brew. Very straight forward and hard to screw up.[/QUOTE]


    We just had an informal vote amongst the participants and picked the following two:


    "Little Rest Lager": [url]http://beerrecipes.org/showrecipe.php?recipeid=1010[/url]


    "Big Bang Pilsner": [url]http://beerrecipes.org/showrecipe.php?recipeid=63[/url]

  2. #22
    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981266]We just had an informal vote amongst the participants and picked the following two:


    "Little Rest Lager": [url]http://beerrecipes.org/showrecipe.php?recipeid=1010[/url]


    "Big Bang Pilsner": [url]http://beerrecipes.org/showrecipe.php?recipeid=63[/url][/QUOTE]

    Do you guys have cold-temperature capabilities?

  3. #23
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    [QUOTE=OrangeJet;2981303]Do you guys have cold-temperature capabilities?[/QUOTE]

    Not sure what you mean?

  4. #24
    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981331]Not sure what you mean?[/QUOTE]

    Lager is fermented and conditioned for a long period of time at cold temperatures, that how it gets the clarity and smoothness. If that can't be achieved, you may be better off just going with an ale...that way you don't have to muss about with liquid yeast. You can take the cheaper and easier route with dry ale yeast.

    Lagers can be fermented at ale temps, but then you're truly not lagering, though.

  5. #25
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    [QUOTE=OrangeJet;2981344]Lager is fermented and conditioned for a long period of time at cold temperatures, that how it gets the clarity and smoothness. If that can't be achieved, you may be better off just going with an ale...that way you don't have to muss about with liquid yeast. You can take the cheaper and easier route with dry ale yeast.

    Lagers can be fermented at ale temps, but then you're truly not lagering, though.[/QUOTE]

    Thank god for my local 7-11. :yes:

  6. #26
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    [QUOTE=OrangeJet;2981344]Lager is fermented and conditioned for a long period of time [B]at cold temperatures[/B], that how it gets the clarity and smoothness. If that can't be achieved, you may be better off just going with an ale...that way you don't have to muss about with liquid yeast. You can take the cheaper and easier route with dry ale yeast.

    Lagers can be fermented [B]at ale temps[/B], but then you're truly not lagering, though.[/QUOTE]

    What temps are needed for lagers, what for ales? If you don't mind the short tutorial?

  7. #27
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    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981350]What temps are needed for lagers, what for ales? [B]If you don't mind the short tutorial[/B]?[/QUOTE]

    You cheap bastid.

    Spend the coin and buy the book "Brewing Beer for Dummies".

  8. #28
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    [QUOTE=PatsFanTX;2981355]You cheap bastid.

    Spend the coin and buy the book "Brewing Beer for Dummies".[/QUOTE]

    I'm making pulled pork, I'm leaving the brewing part to the brew-master. Just want to check to see that we aren't totally f-ed!

  9. #29
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    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981350]What temps are needed for lagers, what for ales? If you don't mind the short tutorial?[/QUOTE]

    In general lagers ferment in the upper 40's to low 50's F. Ales in the 60-70 degree range. Plus, lagers are stored at close to freezing temos for months sometimes to clear up. I usually bring mine down to about 36-38 degrees for 4 weeks before kegging.

  10. #30
    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981350]What temps are needed for lagers, what for ales? If you don't mind the short tutorial?[/QUOTE]

    65-70 is good for ales.

    Mid 40's to 50's for fermentation and 30's for conditioning of a lager.

  11. #31
    [QUOTE=Brewman13;2981376]In general lagers ferment in the upper 40's to low 50's F. Ales in the 60-70 degree range. Plus, lagers are stored at close to freezing temos for months sometimes to clear up. I usually bring mine down to about 36-38 degrees for 4 weeks before kegging.[/QUOTE]

    Beat me to it :)

  12. #32
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    [QUOTE=Brewman13;2981376]In general lagers ferment in the upper 40's to low 50's F. Ales in the 60-70 degree range. Plus, lagers are stored at close to freezing temos for months sometimes to clear up. I usually bring mine down to about 36-38 degrees for 4 weeks before kegging.[/QUOTE]

    We have upper 50's. We made sure that we had below 60.

    Can it be stored in a fridge at 36-38 to clear it up?

  13. #33
    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981404]We have upper 50's. We made sure that we had below 60.

    Can it be stored in a fridge at 36-38 to clear it up?[/QUOTE]

    I have debated this myself, but have never tested my spare fridge to see if it could kept constant temp. My main worry is keeping the fermenting temps...that is why I haven't lagered yet.

  14. #34
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    [QUOTE=JStokes;2981404]We have upper 50's. We made sure that we had below 60.

    Can it be stored in a fridge at 36-38 to clear it up?[/QUOTE]

    One thing you can do to try to get temps down is freeze a few soda bottles full of water(plastic bottles of course:P) place the fermenter in a tub of water with some of the ice. swap out the bottles as they thaw and you should be able to get it down to where you want it. Not perfect, but it should do. Also the long term conditioning can be skipped if you don't have anyway to keep those temps.

  15. #35
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    [QUOTE=Brewman13;2981478]One thing you can do to try to get temps down is freeze a few soda bottles full of water(plastic bottles of course:P) place the fermenter in a tub of water with some of the ice. swap out the bottles as they thaw and you should be able to get it down to where you want it. Not perfect, but it should do. Also the long term conditioning can be skipped if you don't have anyway to keep those temps.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks.

    That Ale is looking better and better (although I was really looking forward to a Lager/Pilsner. LOVE Spaten).

  16. #36
    I do some homebrewing on the side for fun. Best beer I made was a Dortmunder, I have a local home brew supply shop and the owner set me up with the recipe and it didn't disappoint. As far as tips:
    1) Be anal about cleanliness of everything your beer will touch, you don't want any bacteria in your final product
    2) Don't go over the recommended amount of priming sugar for whatever you are making or else your bottles will explode.

    That's really it, making beer is a pretty simple hobby. Good luck and get drunk:D

  17. #37
    [QUOTE=crazyjetsman28;2981754]I do some homebrewing on the side for fun. Best beer I made was a Dortmunder, I have a local home brew supply shop and the owner set me up with the recipe and it didn't disappoint. As far as tips:
    1) Be anal about cleanliness of everything your beer will touch, you don't want any bacteria in your final product
    2) Don't go over the recommended amount of priming sugar for whatever you are making or else your bottles will explode.

    That's really it, making beer is a pretty simple hobby. Good luck and get drunk:D[/QUOTE]

    Indeed. It's quite easy (but can be complicated if stepping up to AG) to make a beer far better than the piss you get at the store. One drawback, is that I drink A LOT more beer nowadays. Well, that's not really a drawback, but it requires much more exercise on my part.

  18. #38
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    Temparture control and cleanliness are key. I used to extract my own malt, which took much longer. You're better off starting with the canned wort.

  19. #39
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    [QUOTE=PatsFanTX;2981348]Thank god for my local 7-11. :yes:[/QUOTE]

    Your 7-11 sells Beer? Till what hour?

  20. #40
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    Beer pics- looks successful so far

    Checking the specific gravity (German Bock and a Pilsner):

    [IMG]http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk142/jstokes719/DSC_4144.jpg[/IMG]

    Sparging (pretty gross skimming off the hops):

    [IMG]http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk142/jstokes719/DSC_4138-1.jpg[/IMG]

    Day 2: Fermenting nicely:

    [IMG]http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk142/jstokes719/DSC_4145.jpg[/IMG]

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