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Thread: The wine corner

  1. #1
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    The wine corner

    Please suggest your favorite wines. Be specific. Disregard those who come here and mock sophistication. For those people I suggest a newly formed Schaeffer/Utica Club forum to be moderated by 32Green.

  2. #2
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    A good Shiraz from Australia.......

  3. #3
    Just had a spiced wine from Osprey out east, it was served hot... Definatly one of the best holidays wines i have ever tried.

  4. #4
    Not the same vintage (70s era if I remember correctly), but Talbot is the best bottle of red I ever drank. While living in the SF Bay Area, I had a 1/4 cord or so of wood which I couldn't use because my landlord wouldn't fix my fireplace. One day, I see the older gentleman next door who I knew to say hello and asked if he wanted it. He said yes and what would I want for it. Jokingly, I said "give me a bottle of wine". That's what he gave me. At the time, the vintage was no longer available unless you had it in your collection. When I thanked him a few days later (he had taken the wood when I wasn't home and left the bottle in my carport) he says, "Yeah, I really should start drinking some of those cases".

    Last edited by Borgoguy; 10-08-2009 at 06:18 PM.

  5. #5
    Coppola Cask Cabernet

    Wine: Rubicon Estate Cask Cabernet 2004
    Maker: Niebaum-Coppola Rubicon
    Vintage: 2004
    Varietal: 100% Cabernet Sauvignon
    Price Range: $65-75 a bottle, hard to find. 2005 is around $65
    Notes: When we opened this bottle, the smell of green peppers dominated the first impressions. As the bottle sat open for 20 minutes, the flavors settled into a lovely chocolate mole with a subtle grassiness. Throughout the evening the ripe cherries teased the nose. Also notable was were the spiciness of white pepper down the middle of the tongue and a light chalkiness and the sides of the mouth.

    This bottle is apparently difficult to find and is not even available on the Rubicon website, but the 2005 shows similar qualities, so may be a worthy substitute--I'll need to go back and see!

  6. #6
    Johnny Walker Blue

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Conkboy View Post
    Throughout the evening the ripe cherries teased the nose.
    I HATE when that happens.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
    Johnny Walker Blue
    He needed the money. OH!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by FF2® View Post
    He needed the money. OH!
    Can you give me a power rankings for your top 5 wines?

  10. #10
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    My two favorites for sentimental reasons (wifey dates), but also exceptional wines today depending on the vinter:


    Red--Chateauneuf du Pape

    White--Pouilly Fuisse


    I usually pick these up for special occasions or for gifts.

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    For those of you drinking ten dollar California and Australian red wines, may I suggest that you walk over to the Spain, Argentina and Chile aisles as I believe they offer the best values in wine. As much as I love French wine (I really need to know more about Italian wine too), many of the cheaper Spanish and South American wines will have the fruit forwardness of the Australian and American wines you are familiar with. Many of you will probably,at this point, consider french wines to be too subtle and many Italian to be too tannic (think licking your baseball glove when standing in the outfield as a kid.) Eventually you will find Italian and French wines to be great, but I think Spanish/South American is a good second step.

    From Spain try a Grenache or a Garnacha. Fairly fruit forward. Las Rocas is a solid wine and available everywhere for about ten or eleven dollars.

    Also from Spain, try a Tempranillo. Fruit forward with a little earthiness and spicy finish.

    From Argentina try a Malbec. I'm not as high on these as I was a few years ago because they are being way overproduced. Most are fairly fruit forward, especially in the lower price range. Still a nice wine and good for parties as most people will enjoy them.

    Many folks enjoy the red wines from Chile but I haven't had as much luck, so I won't discuss them.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    For those of you drinking ten dollar California and Australian red wines, may I suggest that you walk over to the Spain, Argentina and Chile aisles as I believe they offer the best values in wine. As much as I love French wine (I really need to know more about Italian wine too), many of the cheaper Spanish and South American wines will have the fruit forwardness of the Australian and American wines you are familiar with. Many of you will probably,at this point, consider french wines to be too subtle and many Italian to be too tannic (think licking your baseball glove when standing in the outfield as a kid.) Eventually you will find Italian and French wines to be great, but I think Spanish/South American is a good second step.

    From Spain try a Grenache or a Garnacha. Fairly fruit forward. Las Rocas is a solid wine and available everywhere for about ten or eleven dollars.

    Also from Spain, try a Tempranillo. Fruit forward with a little earthiness and spicy finish.

    From Argentina try a Malbec. I'm not as high on these as I was a few years ago because they are being way overproduced. Most are fairly fruit forward, especially in the lower price range. Still a nice wine and good for parties as most people will enjoy them.

    Many folks enjoy the red wines from Chile but I haven't had as much luck, so I won't discuss them.
    Lol.....

    This thread is all some monumental, elaborate joke right?

    Fairly fruit forward, earthiness, light chalkiness on the side of your mouth....

    Good God man, why do you hate America?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post
    Lol.....

    This thread is all some monumental, elaborate joke right?

    Fairly fruit forward, earthiness, light chalkiness on the side of your mouth....

    Good God man, why do you hate America?
    When I want information on Thunderbird I'll pm you. Please leave.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post
    Lol.....

    This thread is all some monumental, elaborate joke right?

    Fairly fruit forward, earthiness, light chalkiness on the side of your mouth....

    Good God man, why do you hate America?
    Like a great wine, the overt impact is overshadowed by the lingering, if not wholly powerful, subtext of the joke. This is really funny. Nice writing, 32.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    When I want information on Thunderbird I'll pm you. Please leave.
    You cant fool me. I'm not buying this wine smokescreen, Jethro.

    I see you. I SEE YOU.


    Quote Originally Posted by Borgoguy View Post
    Like a great wine, the overt impact is overshadowed by the lingering, if not wholly powerful, subtext of the joke. This is really funny. Nice writing, 32.
    Why thanks, Borgo, I believe you actually know wine.

  16. #16
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    I would appreciate some advice on Italian red wines. As mentioned before, I've had some troule with the leather-like tannins, even after airing it out for several hours. I'm becoming a bit more accustomed to them though, but still not quite my thing.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post
    You cant fool me. I'm not buying this wine smokescreen, Jethro.

    I see you. I SEE YOU.




    Why thanks, Borgo, I believe you actually know wine.
    Please go to a bar with a special on domestic canned beer and stink up people with your cigarettes. You are out of place here.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    For those of you drinking ten dollar California and Australian red wines, may I suggest that you walk over to the Spain, Argentina and Chile aisles as I believe they offer the best values in wine. As much as I love French wine (I really need to know more about Italian wine too), many of the cheaper Spanish and South American wines will have the fruit forwardness of the Australian and American wines you are familiar with. Many of you will probably,at this point, consider french wines to be too subtle and many Italian to be too tannic (think licking your baseball glove when standing in the outfield as a kid.) Eventually you will find Italian and French wines to be great, but I think Spanish/South American is a good second step.

    From Spain try a Grenache or a Garnacha. Fairly fruit forward. Las Rocas is a solid wine and available everywhere for about ten or eleven dollars.

    Also from Spain, try a Tempranillo. Fruit forward with a little earthiness and spicy finish.

    From Argentina try a Malbec. I'm not as high on these as I was a few years ago because they are being way overproduced. Most are fairly fruit forward, especially in the lower price range. Still a nice wine and good for parties as most people will enjoy them.

    Many folks enjoy the red wines from Chile but I haven't had as much luck, so I won't discuss them.
    On Chile, a friend's wife can't drink most reds because of sulfides or sulfates or something that gives her headaches and he has her convinced that this one Chilean wine has none. It is actually very reasonable and quite good.

    Italian wines are actually pretty easy. Don't spend a lot, try a bunch and you'll find a lot that are very easy to drink.

    Most of the Super Tuscans are quite good and very reasonable. I also always have a bottle of Chianti and/or a Montepulcianno de Abrruzzi around for drinking.

    Most Italian wines are not very snooty.

    My favorite Italian white wine is called Frascati which is a crisp white wine made on the hills just outside of Rome. My local liquor store imports a very nice brand (not Fontana Candida) and it's about $7 a bottle!!

    Best Italian Pinot Griggio is Santa Margherita (which is not FROM Santa Margherita but from outside Venice), pricier than most others (about $25-$28 a bottle), but still not bad.

    The white I drink the most is Sauvigon Blanc. Not a Chardonnay fan.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JStokes View Post
    On Chile, a friend's wife can't drink most reds because of sulfides or sulfates or something that gives her headaches and he has her convinced that this one Chilean wine has none. It is actually very reasonable and quite good.

    Italian wines are actually pretty easy. Don't spend a lot, try a bunch and you'll find a lot that are very easy to drink.

    Most of the Super Tuscans are quite good and very reasonable. I also always have a bottle of Chianti and/or a Montepulcianno de Abrruzzi around for drinking.

    Most Italian wines are not very snooty.

    My favorite Italian white wine is called Frascati which is a crisp white wine made on the hills just outside of Rome. My local liquor store imports a very nice brand (not Fontana Candida) and it's about $7 a bottle!!

    Best Italian Pinot Griggio is Santa Margherita (which is not FROM Santa Margherita but from outside Venice), pricier than most others (about $25-$28 a bottle), but still not bad.

    The white I drink the most is Sauvigon Blanc. Not a Chardonnay fan.
    Did you see the French white wine I asked you about in the "Do you drink every day thread". Also very crisp.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    I would appreciate some advice on Italian red wines. As mentioned before, I've had some troule with the leather-like tannins, even after airing it out for several hours. I'm becoming a bit more accustomed to them though, but still not quite my thing.
    I rarely buy Italian wine any more. They have priced themselves out of my sphere, big time. Although you will not drink better reds than Brunello, Barolo, Amarone, Chianti, or even a "Super Tuscan", a good example of each will include a hefty price tag. If tannins are bothersome for you, experiment with a bottle of Amarone, which is made with grapes that have been air dried prior to pressing.



    BTW, did you see my response to your Apremont post? That came out of left field.

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