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Thread: City people vs Country people

  1. #1

    City people vs Country people

    Do you think city people are happier than country people or vice versa? These are some basic characteristics outlining each geographical area and what they offer to its residents:

    Country side: quiet, secure, safe, clean air, Daisy Dukes and the ability of raising large mammals

    Cons: In many cases, no Internet or cable, no grocery stores, hospitals, etc


    City pros: All country cons, in addition, strip clubs

    Cons: Stressful life, rude people, traffic

  2. #2
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    [QUOTE=82nd Airborne;3311483]Cons: In many cases, no Internet or cable, no grocery stores, hospitals, etc...[/QUOTE]

    Ummm...us bumpkins actually do have the InTeRnEtZ, grocery stores AND hospitals.

    Sheeeeeeeet...we even have that new fangled running water...

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;3311614]Ummm...us bumpkins actually do have the InTeRnEtZ, grocery stores AND hospitals.

    Sheeeeeeeet...we even have that new fangled running water...[/QUOTE]

    The funniest thing is driving down a country road through a depressed rural area, with ramshackle houses, dilapidated cars in the driveway, threadbare couches on the front porch...and a Dish Network satellite dish hanging off a 2 x 4 nailed onto the side of the house. :D

  4. #4
    Country people have higher suicide rates, I think its the loneliness. There are some remaining urban neighborhoods left where the people treat each other decently, if you can live there its better. But most of today's urban neighborhoods suck ass. Life isn't worth living when you feel the need to put on a tough guy face every time you step outside so people won't think your an easy target.

  5. #5
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    tough call, but at least the city has wifi

    [IMG]http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b38/lcple3/deliv05.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://thisisbandit.com/wp-content/uploads/homeless-man-goes-online.jpg[/IMG]

  6. #6
    I lived in few places in my life out in the middle of nowhere in the catskills, in Jersey in the Morris county area, and in the Wilkes barre Scranton area and I can tell you that living in the middle of nowhere sucks! I was about 40 miles to the nearest supermarket in NY state. It was depressing when it rained and all there was to do was walk around the woods. In NJ there is a mall on every corner and a lot more to do. Scranton Wilkes barre area is coping NJ buy building condo's, malls, every type eating place you can think of and nightclub after nightclub. All and all the Suburbs or the city is the way to go.

  7. #7
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    Sum good things 'bout living in the "sticks"...

    Not having to pay to park
    Not having to worry about Achmed flying a plane into your place of employment
    Not having to live near/around 8 million other a-holes
    Not having to pay 2k/month for a place to live

  8. #8
    Live in the country myself - though not in the United States - I love the city, but only to visit. The Country rocks, all things considered.

  9. #9
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    ATV's & Pickups > Bicycles & BMW's

    ;)

  10. #10
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    I worked in NY for a year. To tell the truth, I don't know how any of you all live like that... stacked up on each other, always tied up in traffic. Not my bag.

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=jetsfanforlife78;3311908]I lived in few places in my life out in the middle of nowhere in the catskills, in Jersey in the Morris county area, and in the Wilkes barre Scranton area and I can tell you that living in the middle of nowhere sucks! I was about 40 miles to the nearest supermarket in NY state. It was depressing when it rained and all there was to do was walk around the woods. In NJ there is a mall on every corner and a lot more to do. Scranton Wilkes barre area is coping NJ buy building condo's, malls, every type eating place you can think of and nightclub after nightclub. All and all the Suburbs or the city is the way to go.[/QUOTE]

    More things to do...yep, and more pedophiles and perverts to protect your family from.

  12. #12
    I'm from NYC and have lived in Boston. Now live in a very small city. It's not crowded, there is no traffic, the cost of living is low, and I can do just about anything I would want to do in a big City except go to a pro sports game. We do, however, have a NY Penn League team - box seats $6.50; beer $2; and Penn State is less than an hours drive. Oh yeah, and my commute to work takes about 5 minutes.

  13. #13
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    Of course the money will have a lot to do with it. I'd rather live in the country if I didn't have a lot of money. The worst situation would be trying to live in an urban area if you can't afford it because your main goal in life is staying alive. Even if I was middle class I'd rather not live in Metro NY, too many people are working their butt off to live in dumpy houses in dumpy neighborhoods. Unless you have strong family ties, I can't understand why you'd try to squeeze by in such an expensive areas when there are so many areas of the US where you can get a nice home for under $200k and a palace for $300k. Yeah salaries in these areas are lower, but they are nothing like the salary/cost of living ratio in Metro NY.

    Even though I live in a log cabin in a rural state, I live about ten minutes from a dozen or so box stores. There's also more of a hippie attitude and my town is kind of expensive, so I'm not the classic small town guy. I traveled door to door for a few years as a background investigator around a lot of the country though, and I can tell you there aren't many Mayberrys around anymore (although there are some in the upper midwest). Most nice small towns are bed and breakfast/antique towns that are kept up to attract yuppies from urban areas for long weekends, or college towns. A lot of people in small towns, obviously not all, seem to have given up. Houses and yards aren't maintained and they appear more obese to me. When you get to know them though, they are good people and appear more willing to help their neighbors than metro folks who appear more wrapped up in their own lives.

    The only thing I miss about metro areas are the restaurants, and if you live in a really rural area this could be a problem if you are used to a lot of choices. I don't miss a 90 minute commute each way to work, looking back that seems like a big waste of life. I don't miss crawling on highways with a sea of red lights in front of me and a sea of white lights coming at me.

    The biggest pro to rural life is less traffic and a slower pace. People aren't as caught up in the rat race, trying to appear successful - the car you drive or the size of your house just isn't that big of a deal. Looking back on suburban and city life, it just seems like a lot of frenetic dog paddling. Especially if you don't have the cash necessary for your area.

    Oh, and it's also nicer to look at mountains and trees rather than factories and asphalt. I wouldn't go back, but it's not for everyone.
    Last edited by Timmy®; 10-16-2009 at 08:56 AM.

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=JStokes;3311631]The funniest thing is driving down a country road through a depressed rural area, with ramshackle houses, dilapidated cars in the driveway, threadbare couches on the front porch...and a Dish Network satellite dish hanging off a 2 x 4 nailed onto the side of the house. :D[/QUOTE]

    You been to my hood????

    Personally, I really like Charlotte. It aint country, it aint BIG city. 1 mil people in the city, that's it.

    Cosmopolitan enough, great restaurants, 2 hrs to skiing, mountains, 3 hrs to the beach. Great Golf.

    It aint perfect.... but I can't live on LI anymore. Traffic, 2 hr commute to NYC.

    I live 1.6 miles from my office and jog there on Saturday's sometimes.
    Last edited by southparkcpa; 10-16-2009 at 09:01 AM.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=Timmy®;3311947]Of course the money will have a lot to do with it. I'd rather live in the country if I didn't have a lot of money. The worst situation would be trying to live in an urban area if you can't afford it because your main goal in life is staying alive. Even if I was middle class I'd rather not live in Metro NY, too many people are working their butt off to live in dumpy houses in dumpy neighborhoods. Unless you have strong family ties, I can't understand why you'd try to squeeze by in such an expensive areas when there are so many areas of the US where you can get a nice home for under $200k and a palace for $300k. Yeah salaries in these areas are lower, but they are nothing like the salary/cost of living ratio in Metro NY.

    Even though I live in a log cabin in a rural state, I live about ten minutes from a dozen or so box stores. There's also more of a hippie attitude and my town is kind of expensive, so I'm not the classic small town guy. I traveled door to door for a few years as a background investigator around a lot of the country though, and I can tell you there aren't many Mayberrys around anymore (although there are some in the upper midwest). Most nice small towns are bed and breakfast/antique towns that are kept up to attract yuppies from urban areas for long weekends, or college towns. A lot of people in small towns, obviously not all, seem to have given up. Houses and yards aren't maintained and they appear more obese to me. When you get to know them though, they are good people and appear more willing to help their neighbors than metro folks who appear more wrapped up in their own lives.

    The only thing I miss about metro areas are the restaurants, and if you live in a really rural area this could be a problem if you are used to a lot of choices. I don't miss a 90 minute commute each way to work, looking back that seems like a big waste of life. I don't miss crawling on highways with a sea of red lights in front of me and a sea of white lights coming at me.

    The biggest pro to rural life is less traffic and a slower pace. People aren't as caught up in the rat race, trying to appear successful - the car you drive or the size of your house just isn't that big of a deal. Looking back on suburban and city life, it just seems like a lot of frenetic dog paddling. Especially if you don't have the cash necessary for your area.

    Oh, and it's also nicer to look at mountains and trees rather than factories and asphalt. I wouldn't go back, but it's not for everyone.[/QUOTE]




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  16. #16
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    Loved the city when I was in my 20s, the love the country more in my 40s. Cold front coming thru "the country" down here, going down into the 70s woo hoo!

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    [QUOTE=CraigFL;3311955]Loved the city when I was in my 20s, the love the country more in my 40s. Cold front coming thru "the country" down here, going down into the 70s woo hoo![/QUOTE]

    Talk to us in July, sweat-boy;)

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Timmy®;3311959]Talk to us in July, sweat-boy;)[/QUOTE]

    nice one, except it's as hot up there 90s as it is here 90s. Trust me, I lived in NY most of my life, and hot up there is almost worse, central air EVERYWHERE down here. No more going straight to bed after work 'cause that's where the window rattler is.

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=CraigFL;3311966]nice one, except it's as hot up there 90s as it is here 90s. Trust me, I lived in NY most of my life, and hot up there is almost worse, central air EVERYWHERE down here. No more going straight to bed after work 'cause that's where the window rattler is.[/QUOTE]

    I would imagine you are more prepared with central air. Still I couldn't take that much heat for so many months. I live much farther north and don't have an air conditioner, this year I could have used it for three days or so. But I can understand why folks wouldn't put up with our winters. You pick your poison, unless you live in San Diego.

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=southparkcpa;3311948]You been to my hood????

    Personally, I really like Charlotte. It aint country, it aint BIG city. 1 mil people in the city, that's it.

    Cosmopolitan enough, great restaurants, 2 hrs to skiing, mountains, 3 hrs to the beach. Great Golf.

    It aint perfect.... but I can't live on LI anymore. Traffic, 2 hr commute to NYC.

    I live 1.6 miles from my office and jog there on Saturday's sometimes.[/QUOTE]
    And it's one of the more expensive southern city's to live in.

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