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Thread: 68 Years ago today, a day that will live in infamy...

  1. #1
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    68 Years ago today, a day that will live in infamy...

    I didn't see anyone mention it, but 68 years ago, we were attacked by the Japanese Imperial Navy at Pearl Harbor.

    [IMG]http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/photos1/PR-12.jpg[/IMG]
    :rip:

    [url]http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/photos1/index.htm[/url]

  2. #2
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    Osama would issue them a stern warning and offer to negotiate!

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=FF2;3390904]Osama would issue them a stern warning and offer to negotiate![/QUOTE]

    Please, not here.

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    Thanks, Ches! I was just about to post a thread.

    Rest in peace to all those of the 'greatest generation' who lost their lives on Dec 7, 1941.

    [IMG]http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Everyone%20Else/images-3/pearl-harbor-attack-3.jpg[/IMG]

  5. #5
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    I've read alot about it, seen all the movies. Still can't fathom what the Japs were thinking.

    My Dad was there after the attack with his Navy ship. Decades later he went on a tour of the sunken USS Arizona. The tour was all Japanese. What a crazy world.

    He refused to buy a Toyota.

    RIP.

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    [QUOTE=chesapeakejet;3390890]I didn't see anyone mention it, but 68 years ago, we were attacked by the Japanese Imperial Navy at Pearl Harbor.

    [IMG]http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/photos1/PR-12.jpg[/IMG]
    :rip:

    [url]http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/photos1/index.htm[/url][/QUOTE]

    Thank You for reminding some of our history....

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=FF2;3390931]I've read alot about it, seen all the movies. Still can't fathom what the Japs were thinking.

    My Dad was there after the attack with his Navy ship. Decades later he went on a tour of the sunken USS Arizona. The tour was all Japanese. What a crazy world.

    He refused to buy a Toyota.

    RIP.[/QUOTE]

    Obviously they were thinking they could destroy our entire Pacific fleet in one day, thus eliminating us as a threat completely. And they almost succeeded. Luckily, the Enterprise and Lexington carriers had been moved shortly before, as well as key battleships. Had the entire fleet been there at the time of the surprise attack, we would have been in trouble.

    RIP to the victims

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    [QUOTE=Lone Star Lady;3390915]
    Rest in peace to all those of the 'greatest generation' who lost their lives on Dec 7, 1941.

    [/QUOTE]



    Greatest generation indeed.

    God bless them all.

    _

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=JetPotato;3391083]Obviously they were thinking they could destroy our entire Pacific fleet in one day, thus eliminating us as a threat completely. And they almost succeeded. Luckily, the Enterprise and Lexington carriers had been moved shortly before, as well as key battleships. Had the entire fleet been there at the time of the surprise attack, we would have been in trouble.

    RIP to the victims[/QUOTE]

    and on this very special day....

    [QUOTE][B]Pearl Harbor mini-submarine mystery solved?
    Researchers think they have found the remains of a Japanese mini-submarine that probably fired on U.S. battleships on Dec. 7, 1941[/B]

    The remains of a Japanese mini-submarine that participated in the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor have been discovered, researchers are to report today, offering strong evidence that the sub fired its torpedoes at Battleship Row.

    That could settle a long-standing argument among historians.

    Five mini-subs were to participate in the strike, but four were scuttled, destroyed or run aground without being a factor in the attack. The fate of the fifth has remained a mystery. But a variety of new evidence suggests that the fifth fired its two 800-pound torpedoes, most likely at the battleships West Virginia and Oklahoma, capsizing the latter. A day later, researchers think, the mini-sub's crew scuttled it in nearby West Loch.

    The loch was also the site of a 1944 disaster in which six tank landing ships preparing for the secret invasion of Saipan were destroyed in an ammunition explosion that killed 200 sailors and wounded hundreds more.

    When the Navy scooped up the remains of the so-called LSTs and dumped them outside the harbor to protect the secrecy of the invasion, it apparently also dumped the mini-sub's remains, which were mingled with the damaged U.S. ships.

    "It's not often that a historian gets a chance to rewrite history," said marine historian and former Navy submariner Parks Stephenson, who pieced together the evidence for the television program "Nova." "The capsizing of the Oklahoma is the second most iconic event of the attack. If one submarine could get in in 1941 and hit a battleship, who knows what a midget sub could do today. Iran and North Korea are both building them. It's very worrying."

    Stephenson and his colleagues have put together a convincing chain of circumstantial evidence, but it is just circumstantial, said Burl Burlingame, a journalist at the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and author of "Advance Force: Pearl Harbor."

    "There is a good chance that this is the Pearl Harbor midget, but I don't think the case is closed on it," Burlingame said. "At this point, it is not hard evidence."

    The two-man, 80-foot-long sub in question does not have a name of its own. Each of the five subs in the attack was carried by a conventional submarine and took its name from the mother boat. It is thus called the I-16-tou -- tou being Japanese for boat. Powered by a 600-horsepower electric motor, the sub could reach underwater speeds of 19 knots, twice as fast as many of the U.S. subs of the day.

    The three pieces of the sub were found during routine test dives between 1994 and 2001 by Terry Kerby, chief pilot of the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V. But Kerby and others assumed they were a part of a war trophy that had been captured by allied forces at Guadalcanal or elsewhere, towed back to Hawaii and scuttled.

    Stephenson got involved in 2007 because he was looking for the fifth Japanese mini-sub.

    In 1941, a crewman on the I-16 had received a radio call from the I-16-tou at 10:41 p.m. on Dec. 8 reporting the success of its mission. That indicated to Stephenson that the mini-sub had found a calm place in the harbor and hidden until the next night before surfacing and sending the call.

    The crew members would have then scuttled the craft because they could not get it out of the harbor. The West Loch would have been a good location to hide, but researchers could find no trace of the boat there.

    A diver who had been looking for the mini-sub suggested that Stephenson talk to Kerby, who sent him pictures of his find.

    "As soon as I saw the bow section with the distinctive net cutter, I knew that we had found the fifth midget sub," Stephenson said. The Japanese navy modified net cutters on the subs for specific missions, and the one on the wreck was identical to those on the other mini-subs.

    No torpedoes were found on the wreck, and evidence suggests that they were not present when the boat was sunk. A newly declassified photograph taken by a Japanese plane during the attack appeared to show a mini-sub firing a torpedo into Battleship Row. A report to Congress in 1942 by Adm. Chester W. Nimitz describes an unexploded 800-pound torpedo recovered after the battle. That's twice the size carried by the torpedo bombers.

    That torpedo was apparently a dud that missed the West Virginia.

    But an examination of the remains of the Oklahoma shows that it apparently had underwater damage much larger than that associated with aerial torpedoes. An underwater blast would have caused it to capsize, Stephenson said. "Otherwise it would have settled to the bottom upright," like the other sunken ships.

    The 1944 disaster at West Loch occurred on May 21 as the Navy was preparing to invade the Mariana Islands in Operation Forager. The Navy clamped a top-secret classification on the incident to keep it from the Japanese, and few records are now available. What is known is that it was crucial to clear out the debris because the loch was by then the site of an ammunition dump.

    Records from the salvage ship Valve showed that it was brought into the loch during the cleanup and its 250-ton crane was used for an undisclosed reason. Stephenson thinks it lifted the I-16-tou, but there are no records to confirm that.

    The remains of the mini-sub were then dumped three miles south of Pearl Harbor along with those of the LSTs, to be found by Kerby 50 years later.

    Bulkheads on the wreck are sealed, so researchers don't know whether the mini-sub crew was trapped. But a map taken from one of the other mini-subs showed the location of a safe house in Pearl City, Hawaii, suggesting the crew might have scuttled the boat and escaped.

    The "Nova" episode describing the search for the I-16-tou will air Jan. 5.[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-sci-minisub7-2009dec07,0,6991792.story[/url]

  10. #10
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    I went to a memorial today to honor those that day. I was shocked to see how many of those who were actually there that day.

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    The day the world changed. It pulled the US into the war.

    What kind of a world would we be living in had the US not joined forces against Hitler :eek:

    RIP

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;3391128]and on this very special day....



    [url]http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-sci-minisub7-2009dec07,0,6991792.story[/url][/QUOTE]

    Great find! I can't wait to see this tv documentary!

    Thanks!

  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=FF2;3390931]I've read alot about it, seen all the movies. Still can't fathom what the Japs were thinking.

    My Dad was there after the attack with his Navy ship. Decades later he went on a tour of the sunken USS Arizona. The tour was all Japanese. What a crazy world.

    He refused to buy a Toyota.

    RIP.[/QUOTE]

    I was there in 1986. Yes, Japanese tourists all over the place. At the punchbowl cemetery, you couldn't swing a deadcat without hitting a camera wielding Japanese tourist!

    We took the Natl. Park Service launch to the Arizona Memorial, which I'm sure you know is the only launch allowed to tie up there. It was an extremely moving experience. There was a survivor from the West Virginia there, recanting his experience on that fateful day. There wasn't a dry eye in the house when he finished telling us his story. Did you know the night before the bombing, the band from the Arizona won a band contest and their prize was to be allowed to sleep in on Sunday? Some prize it turned out to be. :(

    Every American should visit there at least once if at all possible.

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    RIP to all who died that day.

    I know there was nothing funny about that day, nothing at all.

    Except for the story told by my mom's uncle... which was probably the only funny story to come out of that day.

    He tells it much better than I do, but here goes:

    The night before, my uncle Don (I can't remember right now which battleship he was on or what rank he was) was partying heavily with a fellow soldier. They met up with some women and as the night went on, a large amount of drugs were done and alcohol consumed. (He was not a model soldier.) My uncle Don ended up in the back of one of the woman's cars, and after doing the hibity dibity, went out and did a little more drinking (just to make sure he wasn't sober). He said he wasn't sure how, but ended up in the back of the girl's car again.

    The next morning, the girl woke up when the bombings started. The car was parked in an area which overlooked the harbor. She said she couldn't wake him up, so she just ran. He wouldn't wake up until after the attack!! He completely missed the whole attack! I guess he was the luckiest guy that day, even though he went through a lot of depression, and Survivor's Guilt still haunts him now.

    Now that I'm telling it, I guess it's not all that funny. It's more sad. It's funny when he tells it. I guess you have to know him....

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    It's also been 16 years since Colin Ferguson shot up the LIRR. Rot in hell, piece of sh1t.

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