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Thread: OT: Any surfers?

  1. #1

    OT: Any surfers?

    I've been snowboarding since I was 13, eleven years later I'm very good and can ride pretty much anything. However, the off-season is super long and I wanted to pick up something new -- surfing seemed the best option. I live an hour from the shore and figured it'd be worth a shot.

    Just was wondering if the transition would be easier because of my snowboarding experience and if there's other pointers any of you would have for a true beginner.

  2. #2
    Surfing in Jersey?

    I've never seen anything over shoulder high there.

    I grew up surfing in Florida. Two brothers who were featured on 'lost' videos and what not.

    I really don't see how you can learn to surf in the choppy waters of Jersey.

    (Forgive me if you're not from Jersey :P)

  3. #3
    You can find good waves they are just during the middle of the winter

  4. #4
    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3536140]Surfing in Jersey?

    I've never seen anything over shoulder high there.

    I grew up surfing in Florida. Two brothers who were featured on 'lost' videos and what not.

    I really don't see how you can learn to surf in the choppy waters of Jersey.

    (Forgive me if you're not from Jersey :P)[/QUOTE]

    haha, i'm from jersey -- I guess I'm going with convenience and not needing giant waves just yet. again, im a complete novice.

    how are the waves around revis island? :D

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=dassin;3536152]haha, i'm from jersey -- I guess I'm going with convenience and not needing giant waves just yet. again, im a complete novice.

    how are the waves around revis island? :D[/QUOTE]

    Fairly calm.

    It almost lulls you to sleep. Then, when you're on the island, the volitale storm erupts and leaves you feeling deserted and lonely.

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3536172]Fairly calm.

    It almost lulls you to sleep. Then, when you're on the island, the volitale storm erupts and leaves you feeling deserted and lonely.[/QUOTE]

    Something like this?

    [IMG]http://media.nj.com/jets_impact/photo/darrelle-revis-new-york-jets-1203jpg-9f9b3d4a78b462a4_large.jpg[/IMG]

  7. #7
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    Winter suit, booties and gloves.....

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=dassin;3536178]Something like this?

    [IMG]http://media.nj.com/jets_impact/photo/darrelle-revis-new-york-jets-1203jpg-9f9b3d4a78b462a4_large.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]

    :yes:

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=dassin;3536152]haha, i'm from jersey -- I guess I'm going with convenience and not needing giant waves just yet. again, im a complete novice.

    how are the waves around revis island? :D[/QUOTE]
    Long Beach Island has surfers during the summer, I'm sure it's better during the winter.

    I can't imagaine how cold that water is now

    [IMG]http://blogs.courant.com/rick_green/shrinkage-thumb-207x168.jpg[/IMG]

  10. #10
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    Storms equal Waves...sometimes out of control.

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=Apache 51;3536198]Storms equal Waves...sometimes out of control.[/QUOTE]

    I was never good enough to go out in storm, the rips in Florida will drown you if you don't know what you're doing.

    Not sure if that's the case farther north.

  12. #12
    I'm from Australia, and though I'm well inland, it's very common over here - my nephew surfs every Sunday in Sydney, and spends his holidays surfing hundreds of miles up the coast from Sydney. Even though I'm from well inland, I know a bit about it. First thing to learn is about the beach itself, especially rips - if you can identify a rip it can help your surfing in a lot of ways - you'll then be able to work out where the water is breaking/is going to break - rips will also carry you out to where the action is if you use them right. When you get to the beach, find a headland, or a space above the water and look down upon it and learn how to read the water - what the lack of waves in one part of the beach means (a rip).

    Getting to and from the beach with boards, getting them waxed, etc really is quite a chore - you'll have to choose a board appropriate to your beginning status - normally that means a bigger deck than someone who's been doing it a while.

    Things can get quite volatile out in the waves among the surfers - the tales I've heard of fights breaking out are quite extensive.

    The best surfers seem to be in the right place at the right time to catch the wave - it takes a lot of practice - some beaches have waves that are much easier to catch compared to others - also, waves change through out the day, so often there is a part of the day that is best for surfing. It depends on the tides. When the tide is going out you tend to get these dumpers - they're extremely difficult to catch and not really worth the bother, unless you enjoy the sensation of being in a giant washing machine. The best waves normally are found when the tide is coming in, though there are a host of other factors that feed into this (the general weather, the type of beach etc etc)

    Can't think of anything else at the moment, but if I do I'll post here again.

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=Black Death;3536234]I'm from Australia, and though I'm well inland, it's very common over here - my nephew surfs every Sunday in Sydney, and spends his holidays surfing hundreds of miles up the coast from Sydney. Even though I'm from well inland, I know a bit about it. First thing to learn is about the beach itself, especially rips - if you can identify a rip it can help your surfing in a lot of ways - you'll then be able to work out where the water is breaking/is going to break - rips will also carry you out to where the action is if you use them right. When you get to the beach, find a headland, or a space above the water and look down upon it and learn how to read the water - what the lack of waves in one part of the beach means (a rip).

    Getting to and from the beach with boards, getting them waxed, etc really is quite a chore - you'll have to choose a board appropriate to your beginning status - normally that means a bigger deck than someone who's been doing it a while.

    Things can get quite volatile out in the waves among the surfers - the tales I've heard of fights breaking out are quite extensive.

    The best surfers seem to be in the right place at the right time to catch the wave - it takes a lot of practice - some beaches have waves that are much easier to catch compared to others - also, waves change through out the day, so often there is a part of the day that is best for surfing. It depends on the tides. When the tide is going out you tend to get these dumpers - they're extremely difficult to catch and not really worth the bother, unless you enjoy the sensation of being in a giant washing machine. The best waves normally are found when the tide is coming in, though there are a host of other factors that feed into this (the general weather, the type of beach etc etc)

    Can't think of anything else at the moment, but if I do I'll post here again.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks BD, that's the type of insight I was hoping to get.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3536199]I was never good enough to go out in storm, the rips in Florida will drown you if you don't know what you're doing.

    Not sure if that's the case farther north.[/QUOTE]

    Dude, not going out into a storm, storms are what brings bigger waves, as long as they are not out of control. You are in the soup......[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf5rIuJPTt0[/url] Where have all the good movies gone?
    Last edited by Apache 51; 03-24-2010 at 01:37 PM.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=dassin;3536131]I've been snowboarding since I was 13, eleven years later I'm very good and can ride pretty much anything. However, the off-season is super long and I wanted to pick up something new -- surfing seemed the best option. I live an hour from the shore and figured it'd be worth a shot.

    Just was wondering if the transition would be easier because of my snowboarding experience and if there's other pointers any of you would have for a true beginner.[/QUOTE]

    Ive been snowboarding since 1987, yeah I'm getting up there in age! During the off season from riding usually go somewhere warm, and surf, it's totally different than being on snow!! The only thing you can translate is goofy or regular, swimming out, catching the wave, standing all a different world.

    My first "lesson" was dont put wieght on your front foot like you do snowboarding, in surfing that reults in "pearling" and you go over the handle bars. Have you ever ridden powder? where you put the majority of wieght on your back foot, and keep your nose up, thats what surfings like!!

    I dont surf as much as I would like, once or twice a year, and I get humbled every time, but it's fun learning. I just stay away from the big breaking waves, then when my confidence is up I will go where all the others are, and you dont get hassled to bad. Have fun!

  16. #16
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    surf? yes...porn sites....

    then again the way things are going we'll all be "serfers" soon....

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=Come Back to NY;3536666]then again the way things are going we'll all be "serfers" soon....[/QUOTE]

    The good news is that your monthly supply of Kotex pads will be covered under the new health care plan....:rolleyes:




    We are gonna have to listen to this for the next 6 1/2 years, huh? Like a bunch of old people complaining about "whipper-snappers"?

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFA9gQh_hSg&feature=related[/url]
    Last edited by PlumberKhan; 03-24-2010 at 07:03 PM.

  18. #18
    [QUOTE=2milehighJet;3536656]Ive been snowboarding since 1987, yeah I'm getting up there in age! During the off season from riding usually go somewhere warm, and surf, it's totally different than being on snow!! The only thing you can translate is goofy or regular, swimming out, catching the wave, standing all a different world.

    My first "lesson" was dont put wieght on your front foot like you do snowboarding, in surfing that reults in "pearling" and you go over the handle bars. Have you ever ridden powder? where you put the majority of wieght on your back foot, and keep your nose up, thats what surfings like!!

    I dont surf as much as I would like, once or twice a year, and I get humbled every time, but it's fun learning. I just stay away from the big breaking waves, then when my confidence is up I will go where all the others are, and you dont get hassled to bad. Have fun![/QUOTE]

    Good insight - I've never tried it myself, but I've been on a few trips with my nephew, my sister and brother in law when I've been staying there in Sydney. Obviously, I've done a bti of swimming in the surf. They get up at 5.30 am on a Sunday to travel across city, normally to Freshwater beach (though sometimes Manly, sometimes other beaches, depending on the conditions). By the time young Declan hits the water its 6.30 am and there already a heap of surfers out. His father Paul has taught me a bit about how to read the surf just by looking at it - he says it's crucial in learning to pick where to surf. You often see really good surfers surfing near a headland - that can be tricky to get to, but that's where riding a rip out to the breaking waves comes in. Whether a beach has rideable waves or not changes from day to day, and it depends on wind direction, swell, ocean currents etc etc.

    Looking at this surfing, it looks nothing like you'll see on TV - the pro surfers get to go to the best beaches, and the waves are often exceptional for surfing. Not that you can't get great waves at any old beach, you can, but more often than not the conditions can be flat, and even if a good size (say 2 metres), can be choppy, or have some other mitigating factor in whether they are really good for surfing or not. This is also not to say there aren't great surfers around - in Sydney alone there are a heap of them - most of them have been in the water since 2 years of age and could probably ride a trash can lid if the surf was good enough.

    The good thing about Australia is that there are just a heap of beaches - almost infinite in number terms of surfing. If you travel up and down any part of the Australian coast, you'll likely come over a headland and see a completely deserted beach in which these exceptional rollers are coming in. Other days that particular beach might be flat as a tack. There are a lot of people in Australia who spend their time driving up and down the coastline chasing the best waves with several surfboards strapped to the top of their cars.

    I've had one reasonably scary situation I was in at Newport beach in Sydney. There was a big swell, but I went out for a swim anyway (beach was basically deserted because of the conditions) and quickly found myself in a pretty bad rip and was being swept out to sea. I was several hundreds of metres from shore, which is drowning territory, but I I knew the drill, which is to swim parallel to the shoreline, which gets you out of the rip (rips often are only 10/20 metres wide, sometimes a little bigger) I was then able to swim to shore with ease.

    Australia has a lot of drownings each year from overseas people who don't know the beach. They look at a beach and think the safest part of it is is where the waves aren't breaking, but in actual fact that's the most dangerous part. That's where the rips are; you can't see them unless you know what to look for - Michael Phelps wouldn't be able to swim against a decent rip, but that's why you swim sideways to the beach to get out of it, rather than struggling against it.

  19. #19
    There are plenty of beaches where you can surf in NJ & Long Island. Really good waves are rare but do exist. Depending on how big you are you probably want to learn on an 8' fun shape board...maybe a little shorter if you are not a big guy.

    I learned to surf in Manasquan & Spring Lake. Just use good etiquette...don't go out when it gets to big, don't drop in & don't let go of your board when you duck dive and no one will give you any problems.

    [url]http://www.surfline.com/home/index.cfm#[/url]

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;3536684]The good news is that your monthly supply of Kotex pads will be covered under the new health care plan....:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    unfortunately for you it looks like your viagra won't be covered...make sure you book mark that thread on extenze- ...it'll probably come in handy...

    [QUOTE]We are gonna have to listen to this for the next 6 1/2 years, huh? Like a bunch of old people complaining about "whipper-snappers"?[/QUOTE]

    6 1/2 years??? nah- but rest assured you'll be whining like a b!tch in about 6 1/2 months time...
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 03-25-2010 at 08:35 AM.

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