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Thread: Leon Washington's agent responds to Rex

  1. #41
    leon, in the best of times is no more than a 10-15 touch type player and that includes special teams duties. he and his agent had better start getting that through their heads.

  2. #42
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    [QUOTE=sameoldjets;3538561]leon, in the best of times is no more than a 10-15 touch type player and that includes special teams duties. he and his agent had better start getting that through their heads.[/QUOTE]

    exactly and it's not a knock, i love leon and i think he's a great player but no cap is no excuse to act foolish.

  3. #43
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    [QUOTE=SMC;3538550]FYI.

    The Jets lost Leon for 9 weeks last year and 3 playoff games.

    Was there a disaster then???[/QUOTE]

    And add Jenkins to that to boot..:yes:

  4. #44
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    Leon in a sign-and-trade with the Chiefs for Thomas Jones.

    SAR I

  5. #45
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    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3538345][B]Rex takes issue with it. [/B]Albeit probably small but enough to vocalize it to a certain degree.

    I don't personally care where he rehabs. But there's more than meets the eye here.

    Therein lies the 'problem'.[/QUOTE]

    Well, that's Rex's pregrogative....I said it right away and still feel the same way - I'm not sure what Rex had to gain by seemingly putting Leon in place by saying that he will be a predominantly 3rd down/STs back. It was a subtle jab at him, whether intended or not. That and Rex's disappointment re Leon's absence from OTAs makes me wonder if this may be an orchestrated PR campaign by the Jets. I'm not sure to what end, but I guess we'll ultimately find out.

    Losing Leon will not be a disaster as some say, but he's definitely an asset to this team and his presence here will make the Offense that much more versatile. If we move him, it shouldn't be for anything less than a 3rd rounder and hopefully more.

  6. #46
    [QUOTE=crasherino;3538591]Well, that's Rex's pregrogative....I said it right away and still feel the same way - I'm not sure what Rex had to gain by seemingly putting Leon in place by saying that he will be a predominantly 3rd down/STs back. It was a subtle jab at him, whether intended or not. That and Rex's disappointment re Leon's absence from OTAs makes me wonder if this may be an orchestrated PR campaign by the Jets. I'm not sure to what end, but I guess we'll ultimately find out.

    Losing Leon will not be a disaster as some say, but he's definitely an asset to this team and his presence here will make the Offense that much more versatile. If we move him, it shouldn't be for anything less than a 3rd rounder and hopefully more.[/QUOTE]

    I understand where you're coming from.

    But we haven't burned the bridge with Leon yet and that's all that matters in the world of perception. The other teams can only perceive our issues from the outside looking in.

    He's here if we want him, playing for a contract next season.

    I don't believe the Jets would move him for anything less than what he's tagged with.

    His replacement is in the 2nd round, whether it be McCluster or Best.

    So personally, of the 3 backs, I don't care who plays next season. But one of them will be a Jet come opening day and that's all that matters.

  7. #47
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    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3538603]I understand where you're coming from.

    But we haven't burned the bridge with Leon yet and that's all that matters in the world of perception. The other teams can only perceive our issues from the outside looking in.

    He's here if we want him, playing for a contract next season.

    [B]I don't believe the Jets would move him for anything less than what he's tagged with.[/B]
    His replacement is in the 2nd round, whether it be McCluster or Best.

    So personally, of the 3 backs, I don't care who plays next season. But one of them will be a Jet come opening day and that's all that matters.[/QUOTE]

    You're probably right about that, which no one will want to pay. The only way it would be less is if the Jets feel that they simply don't have a chance to keep him beyond 2010 (we'z gots a lot of guys to sign). If that's the case, considering we have a guy like LDT on the roster who can fill Leon's role, I can see us taking a 3rd rounder plus something else, perhaps.

  8. #48
    [QUOTE=crasherino;3538611]You're probably right about that, which no one will want to pay. The only way it would be less is if the Jets feel that they simply don't have a chance to keep him beyond 2010 (we'z gots a lot of guys to sign). If that's the case, considering we have a guy like LDT on the roster who can fill Leon's role, I can see us taking a 3rd rounder plus something else, perhaps.[/QUOTE]

    That's tough.

    It'd have to be a high third, IMO.

    Then again, the whole damaged goods theory. Who knows.

  9. #49
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    Leon... Hey I got 55

    Mark...Ouch, WTF had 55??

  10. #50
    [QUOTE=32green;3538314]True that. Leon took a calculated risk by listening to this guy. Cool. Careers can be short, and he wanted the best he could get. FIne.

    But he lost his position of strength with the injury (the calculated risk part) but he is still acting like he holds the cards.

    Not smart. Re-assess, regroup, and move on.

    Get back to camp, sit down with Rex, put this behind them.[/QUOTE]

    This is on the money...before the injury he was in a nice position....now LT is in the mix...we can get a 2nd for him ad a good player...but it does not seem like too many teams are lining up to make offers...

  11. #51
    [QUOTE=crasherino;3538329]Putting aside what advice he did or didn't give Leon last year, I don't find anything wrong with what Keels is doing right now.

    I think his statements are actually very carefully worded - he doesn't criticize the team (explicitly), he reaffirms that Leon is a team player and lets it be known that Leon is working diligently to be ready for the season.

    The only real recourse for a player who isn't happy with his contract is to skip voluntary workouts. Sure it would be nice for the whole team to be there, but in reality, do workouts in March have any bearing on the season - especially for a guy who can't even participate? One thing I'm pretty certain about, Leon's teammates have no ill will towards him for not being there....I don't think there will be a problem there when he comes back.

    This will play out how it plays out. If Leon is back with the team, I'm happy - he's a very dynamic player. If we end up trading him, hopefully we get good value. But this is hardly a real acrimonious situation.[/QUOTE]
    Agree completely. I find in unreal how people know on this site that Leon's agent convinced him not to take the Jets offer last year. How do we know it wasn't the other way around?

    The answer is we don't. Jet fans like Leon and dislike his agent but that doesn't make anything posters write to be the truth about conversations and advice that are done in confidence.

  12. #52
    [QUOTE=Queens Jet Fan;3538697]Agree completely. I find in unreal how people know on this site that Leon's agent convinced him not to take the Jets offer last year. How do we know it wasn't the other way around?

    The answer is we don't. Jet fans like Leon and dislike his agent but that doesn't make anything posters write to be the truth about conversations and advice that are done in confidence.[/QUOTE]

    We know, you just have a problem not knowing. Unreal, I know.

  13. #53
    [QUOTE=Queens Jet Fan;3538697]Agree completely. I find in unreal how people know on this site that Leon's agent convinced him not to take the Jets offer last year. How do we know it wasn't the other way around?

    The answer is we don't. Jet fans like Leon and dislike his agent but that doesn't make anything posters write to be the truth about conversations and advice that are done in confidence.[/QUOTE]

    You may have some unfamiliarty with Keels.

    This dude is NOTORIOUS for getting his clients to agree to let him seek outrageous deals.

    He's in Leon's ear all the time letting him know he can get him MJD money.

    Of Course Leon is going to listen. Look what he f*cking did for Lamont Jordan, Larry Johnson, etc...

    Have some sense man ;)

    [quote]The year was 1999. The place was Hampton University and the event was a celebrity basketball game for charity. Everyone has seen charity events with a long list of celebrities scheduled to appear, but this one was different. At this one, they were actually all there. Allen Iverson, the biggest name in basketball, was there. Joe Smith and Jerry Stackhouse were there, along with several other well-known Tar Heels. The fans got way more than they expected. The biggest surprise of all was that the entire game was put together by a 20-year-old college student. The game marked the first time that an unknown kid from Chesapeake, VA named Alvin Keels would deliver more than expected for his clients. However, it certainly would not be the last.

    It’s been almost ten years since that charity basketball game and the NFL agent and CEO of Global Management, Alvin Keels, still remembers it like it was yesterday “I still look at that game as one of my proudest accomplishments.” That’s a pretty high honor from a man who has negotiated some of the biggest contracts in NFL history. “After that game, I kind of just fell into being an agent and the rest is history.” And history it is.

    It’s 9am on the fifth rainy day in a row in Portsmouth, Virginia, but by the smile and the energy Keels has, one would think it was 3pm in Hawaii. As he pulls away from his 6,500 square ft waterfront home in his luxury SUV, with one phone in hand, a blackberry in the cup holder, and a third phone charging, Keels runs down the list of duties for the remainder of the day. He has been up since 7 and has already seen the kids off to school, read and replied to over a dozen emails, and spent an hour on the phone...and this is all before he even gets to his office. “As an agent, you’re always working. My phone is always on I haven’t had a vacation since I got into this business.” Keels's commitment to his job, along with his persistence, has made him one of the hottest up and coming agents in the industry.

    While the fans at that charity basketball game 10 years ago never thought twice about who had organized such a game, one person who did was Lawrence Woodard. Woodard, a very high profile attorney who represents many of today’s top athletes, saw promise in the young Keels. After some brainstorming between the two, they agreed to do some work together and Keels started his first company at the age of 20.

    Keels, a college athlete himself at Elizabeth City State University at the time, had a decision to make. “I was a pretty good baseball player in college and even had a chance to pursue it professionally, but I had to decide if I wanted to chase a dream around the minor leagues for years or get a head start on my professional career.” Keels chose the latter of the two and never looked back.

    By age 21, Keels had his first client, Renard Cox, out of the University of Maryland. Cox went undrafted but did play two years in the NFL. The following year, he landed another Terp, preseason Heisman candidate running back Lamont Jordan. Shortly after signing Jordan, Keels was introduced to standout wide receiver Koren Robinson, whom he would soon also sign. Robinson would go on to be the ninth player drafted overall in 2001, and Jordan the 49th. There were many who questioned if the inexperienced Keels would be able to handle the contract demands of such high picks, but those questions were answered in no time. Both Robinson's and Jordan’s contracts were done with no problems, as Keels had negotiated his first multimillion dollar contracts before he even turned 23.

    Even with his first two contracts under his belt, Keels still had a lot to prove. “A lot of the families of the players I recruited didn’t believe in me, which I could understand because I was the same age as their sons. They really didn’t trust me to handle their kids's careers, but I didn’t let that stop me.” One of Keels's closest friends wasn’t even sold on his ability to get the job done at such a young age. “I knew DeAngelo Hall since he was in high school. He used to run track for my dad and was friends with my younger brother.” When the talented Hall’s time came to pick an agent, he passed on Keels but did retain him as a business manger. However, Keels wasn't bothered “that was fine with me because by being his manger, it gave me a chance to prove what I can do."

    Every draft following 2001, Keels added rookies like Kelly Washington, Sam Aiken, and Julian Battle to his client list, but there were still questions about his ability to land his players that coveted big second contract. In 2005, Keels made the most of his first opportunity to answer his critics. [B] In his first crack at free agency, Keels negotiated the largest contract ever by a back-up running back in NFL history when Jordan signed his 5-year, 28-million dollar deal with the Oakland Raiders. “When Alvin told me how much he thought he could get me, I thought he was crazy at first,” Jordan says.[/B] “I remember wondering if he knew what he was doing, but I had been with him for four years and he hadn’t let me down yet so I trusted him, and it paid off.” Paid off it did. Jordan received more money than anyone expected, and once again Keels had proved himself.

    One person who took special interest in Jordan’s record breaking deal was Larry Johnson Sr., father of Chiefs running back Larry Johnson. At the time Johnson was a back-up running back looking to get a big pay day on his next contract, similar to Jordan. Keels recruited Johnson out of Penn State, but Larry and his father wanted a more experienced agent at the time. Despite going with another agent, Larry Sr. stayed in contact with Keels and when the family was ready to change agents, Keels got the nod this time around. [B]Keels got the chance and once again delivered as he negotiated a 5-year, 43.2-million dollar contract that made Johnson the highest paid running back in NFL history.[/B]

    With the Johnson deal, Keels made his mark in the NFL. General Mangers all across the league knew his name and he still wasn’t even 30. [B]Shortly after that, he took over as Hall’s full time agent and negotiated a 7- year, 70-million dollar deal for him in Oakland, adding one more mega-deal to his resume.[/B] Even with a track record that speaks for itself, Keels still gets funny looks from the parents of recruits. “I still have to prove myself to the families,” Keels laughs. “They see me and say, ‘You’re young. Are you sure you can handle this?’”. While others see his age as a problem, Keels sees it as a plus. "Because of my age, I am able to relate much better to my clients than other agents."

    It’s now 1 pm and Keels is at his desk at his downtown office talking about his life as an agent. “Everyone thinks agents are all snakes or crooks. That’s not the case at all. I’m a family man, a man of God ,and I believe in being honest.” [B] He pauses as his receptionist lets him know he has a phone call from the Jets about his client, Leon Washington. After 10 minutes on the phone, he picks right back up mid sentence as if nothing happened.[/B] “I love my job. I love the competition and I love getting my clients what they deserve,” he finishes.

    If the true test of an agent is getting his clients the money they deserve, Keels is no doubt up there with the best. While other agents may have a more impressive list of clients, few have more impressive contracts. Any agent can get the Tom Bradys and LeBron Jameses of the world the top dollar, but it’s getting the other 98 percent of the athletes paid that sets agents apart. Many of today’s so-called "top agents" have a list of superstars, but many of their clients are unhappy with their contracts. At Global Management, you will be hard pressed to find a client unhappy with his contract. [B]In fact, many of Keels's clients are regarded as some of the most overpaid players in the NFL. Gibril Wilson's and Hall’s new deals this off-season left local papers questioning if their teams had overpaid for Keels’s clients. [/B]
    As he glances at the autographed jerseys from his clients and the awards for involvement in the community that hang on his office walls, he thinks about his journey to where he is today and laughs. “The road was far from easy. I was told ‘no’ so many times I can’t even remember. As a 20-year-old kid, I went after Lavar Arrington, Michael Vick, Courtney Brown, and some I can’t even remember. I went after the biggest names in college football and I didn’t even have one client.” Even he laughs when he thinks about how crazy that sounds. Just when he starts to look like he is finally comfortable with what he has accomplished, he doesn’t allow himself to bask in his own success even for a second. He jumps up, grabs his blackberry, and is out of the door in less than a minute.

    As he gets in the SUV to head to a speaking engagement at a local school, he makes a quick call to one of his newest clients, the 2009 sixth overall pick Andre Smith, just to check on him because “this job never stops...I work for my clients around the clock.” After he speaks to the kids, it’s back on the road...which means back on the phone. He calls the Denver Broncos to check to see how Jordan is doing after hearing the team had brought in another running back. After getting the answer he is looking for, he pulls into his driveway. One more phone call to his mother to confirm that they are still on for dinner tomorrow, a kiss for his kids, and he ducks into his home office. It’s almost 7pm now and Keels knows his day isn’t even close to done. “It’s not even 4 o’clock on the West Coast yet; I have clients all over the country.”

    The clock strikes 11 pm before Keels finally takes the Bluetooth out of his ear. “That should be it for the night,” he says, looking no more tired than he did when the day started. With 15-hour days as routine, most can only wonder how he does it and looks stress-free. It is now midnight and what his client's parents once saw as his biggest downside now looks like his biggest asset: he is young, hungry, and still wide awake.[/quote]

  14. #54
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    [QUOTE=Revi$_I$l@nd;3538713]You may have some unfamiliarty with Keels.

    This dude is NOTORIOUS for getting his clients to agree to let him seek outrageous deals.

    He's in Leon's ear all the time letting him know he can get him MJD money.

    Of Course Leon is going to listen. Look what he f*cking did for Lamont Jordan, Larry Johnson, etc...

    Have some sense man ;)[/QUOTE]

    I think most posters here (at least in QJF and my case) are very familiar with Keels and history. No one is disputing that he's an a-hole. More than anything, I'll take CBNY's opinion that he is widely regarded around the league as such.

    That still doesn't mean that the Jets actually had on the table $4m/yr or over last off season. The reports of these negotiations were just that....reports. We really have no idea what the real numbers were. Its probably true that Leon has an over-inflated sense of self-worth and that that view is probably fostered by Keels, but its not like its easy to put a value on guys like him. SD and Sproles haven't been able to come to a long term deal, and it took a while for Cribbs to get a lucrative long term deal.

    Most people on this site tend to side with with the team in these disputes - which is fine. After all, first and foremost we are all Jet fans - not Leon fans, not Chad fans (with some exceptions), etc. But, a lot of people also don't realize that this is a business and that players view this as a job first and a game second. They need to do what they need to do in order to get what they feel they deserve. If that means skipping a voluntary workout, so be it. Treat it for what it is.....nothing. The responses of "Trade him already" or simply ridiculous.

  15. #55
    i don't think the jets really need washington anymore...agruably, had one of their best years in the playodffs...without him...this team is way past one player with the exception of sanchez...ryan and what he's selling is the star...
    Last edited by 2foolish197; 03-26-2010 at 05:18 PM.

  16. #56
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    [QUOTE=WeskerLogan;3538306]can we trade him already?[/QUOTE]

    Agree

  17. #57
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    [QUOTE=david1023;3538389]You guys are nuts! Losing Leon would be a disaster.[/QUOTE]

    I'm afraid the Leon you're talking about was ALREADY lost -- forever -- when he sustained compound fractures of both bones in his lower leg last season.

    Hey ... I'd love it if I'm wrong (for his sake as a player and person, as well as for the Jets sake), but I suspect that versatile, explosive, playmaker that Jets fans had such high hopes for will never fully come back.

    Agree with those who say it doesn't matter where he rehabs. The only thing I'd say about it is, it shows that he and Keels still aren't facing reality about Leon's value, and that that could lead to more problems down the road for him and the Jets.

  18. #58
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    [QUOTE=gaffneycatch;3538791]I'm afraid the Leon you're talking about was ALREADY lost -- forever -- when he sustained compound fractures of both bones in his leg last season.

    Hey ... I'd love it if I'm wrong (for his sake as a player and person, as well as for the Jets sake), but I suspect that versatile, explosive, playmaker that Jets fans had such high hopes for will never fully come back.

    Agree with those who say it doesn't matter where he rehabs. The only thing I'd say about it is, it shows that he and Keels still aren't facing reality about Leon's value, and that that could lead to more problems down the road.[/QUOTE]

    At the end of the day, it won't really matter as Leon isn't Pete Kendall. Kendall is/was a loud mouth and made the decision that he was going to be a thorn in the side of the team. Guys like Leon, TJ and even Chris Baker don't have it in them to be like Kendall and create a true commotion.

    So, in this instance, we'll probably see Leon go through the motions of the typical disgruntled player (as he did somewhat last year), but when push comes to shove, he'll be busting his ass next to his teammates in camp trying to show that he's back to where he was before. Whether he can do that is anyone's guess. I wouldn't bet against him, but hardly think its a slam dunk. And then, of course, is the tough decision of evaluating how important a guy like Leon really is to this team when we now have LDT for the next two years, Braylon and a maturing Sanchez. Not an easy task.

  19. #59
    jamie dukes on NFLN has said a couple times "the Jets will go with the hot hand"

    usually in reference to the LT signing

    but that statement applies to Leon too...

    if gets healthy he will play

    kinda big if right now. the dude isn't cleared to run yet

  20. #60
    Leon is an obvious gambler. He gambled last year and lost and now he is still willing to gamble on getting a big contract. Bottom line is he will most likely end up signing the tender and reporting; he is rehabbing and that's fine but he needs to tell his agent to STFU and just do his job. If someone is willing to take a shot on him and offer him a contract then great; if not he will be back for the tender. It's a calculated risk but all the nonsense talking needs to stop.

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