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Thread: Sad day for Harley fans...

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    Sad day for Harley fans...

    This place was legendary

    [URL]http://www.lohud.com/article/20104150371[/URL]

    [IMG]http://cmsimg.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BH&Date=20100415&Category=NEWS02&ArtNo=4150371&Ref=AR&MaxW=318&Border=0[/IMG]

    [B]Harley-Davidson fans blue over Reggie Pink closing[/B]

    [B][/B]

    By Richard Liebson • [EMAIL="rliebson@lohud.com"]rliebson@lohud.com[/EMAIL] • April 15, 2010
    [LIST][*][/LIST]
    Reggie Pink, the iconic White Plains Harley-Davidson dealership known to motorcycle enthusiasts throughout the region, has closed its doors for good, a victim of the bad economy.





    The family-owned business started in 1927 and played an important role in U.S. motorcycle history. It shut down last month, just 2 1/2 years after holding a "grand reopening" to celebrate its move into a huge, 44,000-square-foot building at 300 Central Ave., across the street from its former location.
    "Harley-Davidson decided that our old facility wasn't big enough and they pressured us to move to a larger place," owner Leslie Pink Dessauer said. "We made the move and then the economy went down the tubes and we couldn't pay our bills. It's devastating."
    Longtime rider Norman Gaines of Hartsdale purchased five motorcycles from Reggie Pink over the years.
    "After a while, with them, you're not a customer, you're a member of the family," said Gaines, 61. "They got to know what you liked and would call you if something came in that they knew you'd be interested in. And there was never, ever, ever a question about the quality of the work they did.
    "It's breaking my heart, that they closed," he said. "You weren't just dealing with a motorcycle dealership — you were dealing with the history of American motorcycling. It's a shame to know that that resource will no longer be here."
    The business was started by Reggie Pink, an American motorcycle pioneer who began racing in 1915 at age 16 and through the 1940s won races, endurance events and hill climbs in the U.S. and England.

    The White Plains store opened in 1948.
    [URL="http://gannett.gcion.com/?adlink/5111/174952/0/170/AdId=846800;BnId=1;itime=335311386;"][/URL]




    Pink, a member of the American Motorcycle Hall of Fame, died in 1962, the same year the Bronx store closed.
    The business was taken over by his son, Donald, who also gained fame by winning various motorcycle events from the 1940s through the 1970s.
    Donald Pink taught his wife to ride, and Leslie Pink Dessauer also became an accomplished competitor, winning events against men and women from the 1950s to the 1970s.
    She took over the business following her husband's death in 1984.
    Paul Schwab, 62, of Pleasantville began hanging around the shop when he was 16 and riding his first motor scooter. His father died that year, and his mother a year later.
    "Don and Leslie became my surrogate parents," he said. "I didn't know anything about motorcycles, or business, or work ethic, and they taught me everything. They were like my second parents."
    Schwab ended up working for Reggie Pink for 16 years.
    "It was a family business and they were good, hardworking people," he said. "This is personal to me. I'm still in the motorcycle industry and I've been pretty successful. It's all because of Don and Leslie Pink. I'm so angry that Harley-Davidson cut the knees out from under them. Reggie Pink is a landmark in this industry. This is the end of an era."
    Officials from the Harley-Davidson corporate offices could not be reached for comment.
    Reggie Pink not only served its customers, it served the White Plains business community as well, said Marsha Gordon, president of the Business Council of Westchester.
    "They were members of the business council forever, and we were deeply saddened to see them close," she said. "Reggie Pink was a family-owned business and a regional asset. People came from all over to do business with them. It was a solid business, but also a business that may have been experiencing hard times because it sold what might be considered luxury items. Unfortunately, it's a sign of the times."
    The dealership had 18 employees at one point and was down to nine when it closed.
    "It was tough, having to let them go, and having to say goodbye to all the customers who were so faithful to us," Leslie Pink Dessauer said. "This has all been very sad for me. It was a family organization and we wanted to keep it that way. We were grooming the business for my daughter and grandson to take over. We thought Reggie Pink would be around forever, and now it's all gone."

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    [QUOTE]Harley-Davidson decided that our old facility wasn't big enough and they pressured us to move to a larger place," owner Leslie Pink Dessauer said. "We made the move and then the economy went down the tubes and we couldn't pay our bills. It's devastating...[/QUOTE]

    Unfortunately, this is the business model of the New Harley-Davidson. Since the "Land Pirates"(thanx Greaser) have taken over, the franchise has been more about image than actual riding. You almost need a doctorate anymore to be able to afford to ride a Hog. From the article, it seems that the people running the store had motorcycling in their blood...it's terrible that HD didn't defer to them to choose how/what their shop was like, the entire organization could learn a lot from people like the Pinks.

    But now, the company seems to be controlled by marketing/business management degree freaks who have only come this close to being a "biker":

    [IMG]http://waynejoseph.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/russel_kappius_cyclist1.jpg[/IMG]

    :rolleyes:

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    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;3559778]Unfortunately, this is the business model of the New Harley-Davidson. Since the "Land Pirates"(thanx Greaser) have taken over, the franchise has been more about image than actual riding. You almost need a doctorate anymore to be able to afford to ride a Hog. From the article, it seems that the people running the store had motorcycling in their blood...it's terrible that HD didn't defer to them to choose how/what their shop was like, the entire organization could learn a lot from people like the Pinks.

    But now, the company seems to be controlled by marketing/business management degree freaks who have only come this close to being a "biker":

    [IMG]http://waynejoseph.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/russel_kappius_cyclist1.jpg[/IMG]

    :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]
    I don't ride Plumber but I could not help but admire the bikes they used to line up outside that place, especially before they made the move.

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    Good thread and Plumber nailed it.
    I have a short story for you. In 2005 I worked as a finance manager for Harley Davidson. I was a rider so I figured dream job right? I became pretty disenchanted when they had f*cking fashion shows complete with runways and male models to show off what they call, ‘Harley Motor Clothes’. Let me ask you, what is biker about that?
    Dentist and his wife come into my office and want to buy a Harley. They buy the motor cycle to match the new leathers they just bought. Nothing biker about that either.
    A while back my angst was mis-identified as contempt for new riders,not the case at all. My contempt is for Harley Davidson and their pandering to the doctor/dentist/land pirate crowd that ride to solve the identity crisis they have. A real biker doesn’t let his bike or outward appearance define him, rather, the urge to be free and ride. I’d rather take a country raod into the desert but these guys would rather cruise main street and trendy bars.
    In the end, Harley did this to themselves by not recognizing the bubble for what it was, a trendy fad that was due to burst. Now they have driven off many loyal customers to the custom market so they aren’t lumped in with the R.U.B. (Rich Urban Biker) crowd.

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    [QUOTE=Greaser;3559931]Good thread and Plumber nailed it.
    I have a short story for you. In 2005 I worked as a finance manager for Harley Davidson. I was a rider so I figured dream job right? I became pretty disenchanted when they had f*cking fashion shows complete with runways and male models to show off what they call, ‘Harley Motor Clothes’. Let me ask you, what is biker about that?
    Dentist and his wife come into my office and want to buy a Harley. They buy the motor cycle to match the new leathers they just bought. Nothing biker about that either.
    A while back my angst was mis-identified as contempt for new riders,not the case at all. My contempt is for Harley Davidson and their pandering to the doctor/dentist/land pirate crowd that ride to solve the identity crisis they have. [B]A real biker doesn’t let his bike or outward appearance define him, rather, the urge to be free and ride. I’d rather take a country raod into the desert but these guys would rather cruise main street and trendy bars. [/B]
    In the end, Harley did this to themselves by not recognizing the bubble for what it was, a trendy fad that was due to burst. Now they have driven off many loyal customers to the custom market so they aren’t lumped in with the R.U.B. (Rich Urban Biker) crowd.[/QUOTE]

    The [I]wind in your face spirit [/I]never was with a majority of bikes on the road.

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    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;3559778]Unfortunately, this is the business model of the New Harley-Davidson. Since the "Land Pirates"(thanx Greaser) have taken over, the franchise has been more about image than actual riding. You almost need a doctorate anymore to be able to afford to ride a Hog. From the article, it seems that the people running the store had motorcycling in their blood...it's terrible that HD didn't defer to them to choose how/what their shop was like, the entire organization could learn a lot from people like the Pinks.

    But now, the company seems to be controlled by marketing/business management degree freaks who have only come this close to being a "biker":

    [IMG]http://waynejoseph.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/russel_kappius_cyclist1.jpg[/IMG]

    :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]:clapper: :clapper: :clapper:

    [QUOTE=Greaser;3559931]Good thread and Plumber nailed it.
    I have a short story for you. In 2005 I worked as a finance manager for Harley Davidson. I was a rider so I figured dream job right? I became pretty disenchanted when they had f*cking fashion shows complete with runways and male models to show off what they call, ‘Harley Motor Clothes’. Let me ask you, what is biker about that?
    Dentist and his wife come into my office and want to buy a Harley. They buy the motor cycle to match the new leathers they just bought. Nothing biker about that either.
    A while back my angst was mis-identified as contempt for new riders,not the case at all.[B] My contempt is for Harley Davidson and their pandering to the doctor/dentist/land pirate crowd that ride to solve the identity crisis they have.[/B] A real biker doesn’t let his bike or outward appearance define him, rather, the urge to be free and ride. I’d rather take a country raod into the desert but these guys would rather cruise main street and trendy bars.
    [B]In the end, Harley did this to themselves by not recognizing the bubble for what it was, a trendy fad that was due to burst.[/B] Now they have driven off many loyal customers to the custom market so they aren’t lumped in with the R.U.B. (Rich Urban Biker) crowd.[/QUOTE]Outstanding post.


    What is going unsaid here is the tragedy of the local store getting buried in "franchise debt" - the reason that they can't just get a smaller store and go back to the business model is manifold (based on the Dealer contract they likely signed) - to me, this is the real crime. They can't even serve their customers in any fashion (pardon the pun), and I bet that contract and the resultant defaulting on debts will make it impossible to bounce back...I am thoroughly disgusted.

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    I live about 1/2 mile from the place and I only noticed yesterday it was closed w/ the exterior Harley signage removed. Figgered it was a victim of the economy to an extent but I had no idea they were in trouble. Very well known and well-liked, a business fixture in the area.

    They had literally moved across the street, renovating a building several x the size of their original space and now the old & new buildings are both shuttered. The cost of renovation was staggering and not subsidized by the parent company.

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    I bought a seat there for my Sportster 3 years ago, just as they were finishing the new store.

    Very sad. The old one was a pretty cool store, never made it to the new one.

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    [url]http://www.jahsonic.com/EasyRider.jpg[/url]

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    [QUOTE=Greaser;3559931]...they had f*cking fashion shows complete with runways and male models to show off what they call, ‘Harley Motor Clothes’...[/QUOTE]

    Nice. You can tell who is calling the shots at HD nowadays. It's the same doofuses who come up with all the nauseating commercials on TV. Like the new Wheat Thins commercials. Has anyone else seen this? There are two variations of this commercial that I've seen, one with a black guy and one with a white woman. Either one has the protagonist TALKING to goddamn crackers. "Crunch time, Wheat Thins, that's what's gonna happen here." Then, they go about eating Wheat Thins in an X-TREME manner. Literally, DIVING at the goddamn things, then crunching loudly (one of the most annoying aspects of commercials, I believe, is the damned CRUNCHING). IT'S A F**KING CRACKER! THERE IS NOTHING X-TREME OR AWESOME ABOUT IT!

    I went to my cousin's graduation from college a long while ago....when they had all the students who majored in marketing stand up...I yelled "Thanks a lot, ya jerks!"...

    I'm an a**.

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    [QUOTE=southside;3560701] [IMG]http://www.jahsonic.com/EasyRider.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]

    HA! I love that picture! F*cking football helmet..LMAO..remember how Jack Nickolson would take his shots of whiskey?

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySgOds3bzcc[/url]

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    its sucks when a family owened business that they put their heart and souls into get messeed over by the company. Hope all works out for them

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    [QUOTE=JohnnyJet;3560808]its sucks when a family owened business that they put their heart and souls into get messeed over by the company. Hope all works out for them[/QUOTE]

    F'n disgrace,I'd rather cobble a chopper together than buy a corporate bike from those HD ****es.

    Hope it works out for the family.

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