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Thread: Yankees Juan Miranda

  1. #1
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    Yankees Juan Miranda

    Juan Miranda is a backup on the Yankees. He's probably played in less than 20 games in his career.

    Yankees are losing 6-1, the other team is playing a complete shift on the guy....no one is covering third base.

    What gives this guy the right to swing the bat? Who are you? Bunt the ball down third base. It used to kill me that Giambi would bat .218 and swing away with no one covering third.

    Hey stoonod, if you bunt it down third base a couple of times, teams will no longer be able to shift on you = more room for hits on the right side in the future.

    Don't give me the BS "maybe he's not a good bunter." If he's not a good bunter, he shouldn't be in the majors. Bunting is a fundamental part of baseball.

  2. #2
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    The whole logic behind a shift is that its far more valuable for the defense to have you bunt for singles every time up than it is for you to hit doubles or home runs. They are, in effect, saying that they'd be fine with the bunt single and won't stop shifting him even if he tries.

    And really, Miranda is right and is doing what he's been told. Miranda is there to hit for power, not to bunt. That's where his value is tied up.

  3. #3
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    Haven't you heard? Evan Longoria is like Mr. Fantastic he would just stretch his arm from 2nd base field the bunt and throw Miranda out..

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    Well, he went to bunt, failed miserably, banged one out on the next pitch.

    Works for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SDJETS View Post
    The whole logic behind a shift is that its far more valuable for the defense to have you bunt for singles every time up than it is for you to hit doubles or home runs. They are, in effect, saying that they'd be fine with the bunt single and won't stop shifting him even if he tries.

    And really, Miranda is right and is doing what he's been told. Miranda is there to hit for power, not to bunt. That's where his value is tied up.
    That argument makes sense. Except when you're up 6-1. Preventing baserunners is your #1 priority when you have a lead. If he was a half-way decent bunter, the odds of him getting on base far exceed the risk of a solo home run.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rian47242 View Post
    Juan Miguel Miranda (born April 25, 1983, in Consolación del Sur, Cuba) is a Cuban Major League Baseball first baseman for the New York Yankees.
    Contents
    The 5-foot-11 Miranda batted .303 with 27 homers for Pinar Del Rio in Cuba's Serie Nacional from 2002 to 2004.[1] Miranda was on the 2001 Cuban national team. He defected to the Dominican Republic in early 2004. He established residency in 2005, and was granted citizenship there in 2006.
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    Good point.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SDJETS View Post
    The whole logic behind a shift is that its far more valuable for the defense to have you bunt for singles every time up than it is for you to hit doubles or home runs. They are, in effect, saying that they'd be fine with the bunt single and won't stop shifting him even if he tries.
    I politely disagree with that 100%. That's like saying that a power hitter working a walk is a waste of an at bat. 3-4 with 3 singles is better than 1-4 with a double.

    Also, if you show the ability to bunt for a single, they will eventually take off the shift, which will open up the right side of the infield more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chirorob View Post
    I politely disagree with that 100%. That's like saying that a power hitter working a walk is a waste of an at bat. 3-4 with 3 singles is better than 1-4 with a double.

    Also, if you show the ability to bunt for a single, they will eventually take off the shift, which will open up the right side of the infield more.
    But not at all though. Hitting for power doesn't exclude taking walks, and in fact should go hand in hand with it. Look at the best power hitters: lots of slugging, lots of strikeouts, lots of walks. Much higher OBP than avg.

    3-4 with 3 singles is only helpful if the guys behind you, in this case Randy Winn or some such awfulness, can then knock you in. A slow, powerhitting 1B is pretty much useless hitting for higher average but no power. Look at Sean Casey. Dude could hit for average, but only was really valuable when he could hit for at least some power.

    Now look at Miranda. he's hitting around .250. But he has 4 walks and 6 Ks, and OBP nearly 100 points higher than his avg, and a slugging % of .600. Not that he can continue that, per se, but its worth a lot more than Casey ever usually provided.


    The thing is, doubles and HRs are almost ALWAYS more valuable than singles, especially if your slow and play a power heavy position like 1B or DH. Teams only use the shift if a bunt single isn't going to score a run. A double or HR not only have a far greater chance of scoring a run (obviously a HR always does) but then leave a runner in scoring position for the next guy too.

    And in the end, no, teams really won't stop shifting a guy if he starts constantly bunting down the 3B line. They win in that situation, its what they want. First, it has to be more than a bunt to get past the pitcher, so he really has to swing at it, just alter his swing so that it goes towards LF, which of course will then mess up his entire mechanics and timing. Second, its not going to work every single time, baseball just isn't that exact of a science. And even if its works 70% of the time, you're left with a slow, powerhitting guy on 1B with a messed up swing and a slug % equal to his average. So kind of like Juan Pierre without any speed. Yuck.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rian47242 View Post
    Juan Miguel Miranda (born April 25, 1983, in Consolación del Sur, Cuba) is a Cuban Major League Baseball first baseman for the New York Yankees.
    Contents
    The 5-foot-11 Miranda batted .303 with 27 homers for Pinar Del Rio in Cuba's Serie Nacional from 2002 to 2004.[1] Miranda was on the 2001 Cuban national team. He defected to the Dominican Republic in early 2004. He established residency in 2005, and was granted citizenship there in 2006.
    ]
    I loved this spam bot.

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    I actually generally agree with the original poster. The shift is just positioning fielders where they feel you are most likely to hit the ball. If you constantly bunt the ball down the third base line against the shift, they are going to have to change the way they position their fielders to account for that (And if they don't, they're morons).

    Essentially, even if your successful at bunt singles against the shift only half the time (Which should be do-able since all you have to do is push it past the Pitcher down the 3B line somewhere), you'd be putting up a 1.000 OPS by doing so. Chances are, he's better off doing that then he is by actually swinging.

    I think the only reason you don't see it more often is because it's not "macho" enough for them.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ven0m View Post
    I actually generally agree with the original poster. The shift is just positioning fielders where they feel you are most likely to hit the ball. If you constantly bunt the ball down the third base line against the shift, they are going to have to change the way they position their fielders to account for that (And if they don't, they're morons).

    Essentially, even if your successful at bunt singles against the shift only half the time (Which should be do-able since all you have to do is push it past the Pitcher down the 3B line somewhere), you'd be putting up a 1.000 OPS by doing so. Chances are, he's better off doing that then he is by actually swinging.

    I think the only reason you don't see it more often is because it's not "macho" enough for them.
    Example.

    The very same day the OP starts this thread, Miranda attempts to bunt a single down the 3rd base line and fails miserably.

    Next pitch. Jacked. HR.

    That's why they don't bunt.

    A) Because they're not good at it

    B) Because better things happen when you swing the bat.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revi$_I$l@nd View Post
    Example.

    The very same day the OP starts this thread, Miranda attempts to bunt a single down the 3rd base line and fails miserably.

    Next pitch. Jacked. HR.

    That's why they don't bunt.

    A) Because they're not good at it

    B) Because better things happen when you swing the bat.
    Fallacy of the pre-determined outcome.

    There is no way that you can determine that he would have hit that home run if he had never attempted the bunt. Perhaps the pitcher left the pitch in a good spot because the bunt attempt on the previous pitch was in his head.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetPotato View Post
    Fallacy of the pre-determined outcome.

    There is no way that you can determine that he would have hit that home run if he had never attempted the bunt. Perhaps the pitcher left the pitch in a good spot because the bunt attempt on the previous pitch was in his head.
    Not what I'm saying...

    I'm simply saying he sucks at bunting, swing away.

  14. #14
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    Well, obviously, he would have to work on the bunt to the point where he became good at it, but it's not a particuarly hard thing to do if you actually practice doing it. Players just couldn't be bothered to put in that tiny bit of effort.

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