Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Afghans don't know why we are there

  1. #1
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    38,782

    Afghans don't know why we are there

    they aren't the only ones...

    from Reuters


    Few Afghans know reason for war, new study shows

    By Paul Tait

    KABUL (Reuters) - Afghans in two crucial southern provinces are almost completely unaware of the September 11 attacks on the United States and don't know they precipitated the foreign intervention now in its 10th year, a new report showed on Friday.

    NATO leaders gathered in Lisbon for a summit on Friday where the transition from foreign forces -- now at about 150,000 -- to Afghan security responsibility will be at the top of the agenda, with leaders to discuss a 2014 target date set by Kabul.

    Few Afghans in Helmand and Kandahar provinces, Taliban strongholds where fighting remains fiercest, know why foreign troops are in Afghanistan, says the "Afghanistan Transition: Missing Variables" report to be released later on Friday.

    The report by The International Council on Security and Development (ICOS) policy think-tank showed 92 percent of 1,000 Afghan men surveyed in Helmand and Kandahar know nothing of the hijacked airliner attacks on U.S. targets in 2001.

    "The lack of awareness of why we are there contributes to the high levels of negativity toward the NATO military operations and made the job of the Taliban easier," ICOS President Norine MacDonald told Reuters from Washington.

    "We need to explain to the Afghan people why we are here, and both convince them and show them that their future is better with us than the Taliban," MacDonald said.

    The report said there was a continued "relationship gap" between Afghans and the international community, describing the lack of understanding as "dramatic."

    U.S.-backed Afghan forces toppled the Islamist Taliban government in late 2001 for sheltering al Qaeda leaders who plotted the 9/11 attacks that killed about 3,000 people.

    The war has now dragged into its 10th year and violence is at its worst, despite a record number of foreign troops, with military and civilian casualties at their highest levels.

    EXIT TIMETABLE

    Attention is now focused on an exit timetable. U.S. President Barack Obama, who will review his Afghanistan war strategy next month, wants to begin withdrawing U.S. troops from July 2011.

    European NATO leaders, under pressure at home to justify their continued commitment to an increasingly unpopular war, are following a similar timetable. Some are withdrawing troops and others are looking to move from combat to training roles.

    While Afghan President Hamid Karzai has set a target of 2014, NATO's civilian representative in Afghanistan, Mark Sedwill, said this week "eye-watering levels of violence by Western standards" might mean the transition spills into 2015.

    That throws the emphasis back on the Afghan government -- widely seen as so corrupt and inept that it is unable to support itself -- and the readiness of Afghan forces to take over.

    The ICOS report showed 61 percent of respondents in Helmand and Kandahar believe Afghan security forces would not be able to provide adequate security when foreign forces withdraw, and that 56 percent believe the Afghan police are helping the Taliban.

    It noted there was clear "potential for the Afghan security forces to switch sides" after being trained by NATO forces.

    The report said 81 percent of those interviewed in the south thought al Qaeda would return to Afghanistan if the Taliban regained power, and that 72 percent thought al Qaeda would again use the country to launch attacks against the West.

    ICOS senior policy analyst Jorrit Kamminga said the "negative blowback" of the foreign presence could be managed by addressing the chronic poverty, food shortages, unemployment and displacement faced by ordinary Afghans.
    The report noted improvements in some areas of the south, with the number of people in Marjah, a key battleground in Helmand, who thought NATO-led forces were winning the war almost doubling to 64 percent between June and October 2010.

    It was also a very different picture in the north, with 80 percent of 500 men
    interviewed in Parwan and Panjshir provinces thinking the central government was protecting their interests.
    everyone wants to cut costs, I know a good place to start. for the money spent on these bad decision wars we could have a mag-lev train to the moon.

  2. #2
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,956
    Afghans used to know why we are there.

    But I decided to test my long held (solution based) theory that if you mix large, continual doses of high-grade psychedelic acid into the water supply of Taliban held areas that, when the Taliban drank the acid laced water, part of their brains would permanently melt and they would become peaceful.

    My theory was tested and proven successful.

    Now I have to go to Pakistan and melt the brains of several-hundred-thousand murderous Islamic sub-cave people there.

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/...ligion.html?hp

    Condemned Christian Woman Seeks Mercy In Pakistan
    Published: November 20, 2010

    ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - A Christian woman sentenced to death in Pakistan on charges of blaspheming Islam said on Saturday she had been wrongfully accused by neighbors due to a personal dispute, and appealed to the president to pardon her.

    Asia Bibi, mother of four, is the first woman to be sentenced to death under Pakistan's controversial blasphemy law which rights groups say is often exploited by religious extremists as well as ordinary Pakistanis to settle personal scores.

    The 36-year-old farm worker was taken into custody by police in June last year and was convicted by a lower court on November 8. She has been in prison since then, with her case drawing international media attention as well as appeals by human rights groups, and, according to Pakistani media, Pope Benedict.

    "I told police that I have not committed any blasphemy and this is a wrong accusation, but they did not listen to me," Bibi told reporters after meeting with Salman Taseer, governor of the central Punjab province where she is imprisoned.

    "I have small kids. I have wrongly been implicated in this false case," she said in the prison, covered in a cloak that only revealed her eyes.

    Taseer said he would take up Bibi's case with President Asif Ali Zardari, who has the constitutional power to pardon her.

    "Inshallah (God willing) her appeal will be accepted," Taseer said, adding that he had studied Bibi's case and found that she had not committed any blasphemy.

    "She is a helpless Christian woman. She can't legally defend herself because she does not have resources. Implicating such helpless minorities in such cases amounts to ridiculing the constitution of Pakistan," Taseer added.

    On Friday, Zardari asked the ministry for minorities affairs to compile a report on Bibi's case within three days after Pakistani media suggested the accusations stemmed from a village dispute.

    Bibi confirmed she had been involved in a dispute over livestock with her neighbors, but would not give any more details. Pakistani media said the quarrel began when some women who worked on the same farm refused to drink water from a bowl used by Bibi, saying they would not drink or eat anything a non-Muslim has touched.

    Bibi said her opponents physically abused her before taking her to court. "They slapped me...They tried to strangle me. Their women also pulled my hair," she said in a choked voice.

    Pakistan is an overwhelmingly Muslim nation of more than 170 million people. Religious minorities -- mostly Christians -- account for roughly four percent of the population.

    Christians have long complained about the blasphemy law saying it offers them no protection. The law makes it a crime to speak ill of Islam and its Prophet Mohammad, punishable by death, and makes no reference to other religions.

    Blasphemy convictions are common in Pakistan, although the death sentence has never been carried out. Most convictions are thrown out on appeal, but angry mobs have killed many people accused of blasphemy.

    Two Christian brothers accused of writing a blasphemous letter against the Prophet Mohammad were gunned down outside a court in the eastern city of Faisalabad in July.


  3. #3
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Staten Island
    Posts
    9,032
    Quote Originally Posted by bitonti View Post
    they aren't the only ones...

    from Reuters



    everyone wants to cut costs, I know a good place to start. for the money spent on these bad decision wars we could have a mag-lev train to the moon.
    Maybe 9 years have made some people forget, or maybe I have my information wrong. Didn't we go to Afghanistan to look for the guy who sh!tted all over our country on 9/11? That was a bad decision? What would have been a good decision? "Ok, ok, you got us there, nice one". Opening up diplomatic ties with al Qaeda? Oh wait, can't do that since they don't have a flag, or an army, or a country. I guess we can't declare war on them either.

    Seriously, argue all you want about how it has been handled strategically, but don't say it was a bad decision to go there.

  4. #4
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    13,179
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    Maybe 9 years have made some people forget, or maybe I have my information wrong. Didn't we go to Afghanistan to look for the guy who sh!tted all over our country on 9/11? That was a bad decision? What would have been a good decision? "Ok, ok, you got us there, nice one". Opening up diplomatic ties with al Qaeda? Oh wait, can't do that since they don't have a flag, or an army, or a country. I guess we can't declare war on them either.

    Seriously, argue all you want about how it has been handled strategically, but don't say it was a bad decision to go there.
    We want there to kill Al Qeeda and over throw the Taliban. We did both. Obama has turned the mission into nation building.

    There would have been nothing wrong with killing and capturing as many as we did and either going over the border and hunting them down or declare victory and leave.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us