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Thread: Obama to sign landmark bill for black farmers, indian tribes..

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    Obama to sign landmark bill for black farmers, indian tribes..

    Obama to sign landmark bill for black farmers

    WASHINGTON Black farmers and American Indians are about to get some long-awaited justice today when President Barack Obama signs landmark legislation awarding them payments for years of unfair treatment by the federal government.

    But others are still waiting - Hispanic farmers, female farmers and more than 100 Indian tribes, all with their own list of grievances.

    The $4.6 billion measure passed by Congress last month will settle class-action lawsuits to pay thousands of black farmers and American Indians and, as Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack put it, "right past wrongs."

    Advocates and critics of the settlement say the legislation could set a precedent for other groups that also may have claims against the government.

    "It paves the way for justice'' for other disenfranchised groups, said John Boyd, president of the National Black Farmers Association, which has led the decade-long effort. "Hopefully, other minorities will see a smoother path. ... They've been waiting many, many years for justice, too.''

    Congress recently approved $1.2 billion in what is known as the Pigford case, to pay tens of thousands of black farmers who were denied loans and other assistance by federal agriculture officials. It also provided $3.4 billion in the Indian claim known as the Cobell case, named for lead plaintiff Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet tribe. Part of that sum will be used to pay as many as 500,000 Indians, who claimed the Interior Department lost tens of billions of their dollars generated from activities such as timber cutting, cattle grazing and mineral excavation on tribal lands.

    That action followed a $760 million case the administration settled in October with Indian farmers, and agreements with four tribes to settle long-standing disputes over water rights.

    Obama, who campaigned on resolving those cases, saluted Congress last week for approving the settlement, saying it brings "this painful chapter in our nation's history to a close." He also signaled a willingness to turn the page on other civil rights disputes, including those involving Hispanic and female farmers.

    John Echohawk, executive director of the Colorado-based Native American Rights Fund, said he sees the settlements as a sign of more progress ahead. His organization represents 46 Indian tribes that also are suing the government, also alleging mismanagement of trust funds.

    "The administration wants to deal with this issue finally and get it behind us all, and they've made a good start in Cobell," he said. "Hopefully, that can continue with the tribes and get these claims settled."

    But Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa worries that the Pigford settlement could pave the way for other claims that would cost U.S. taxpayers additional billions of dollars.

    "If Pigford is seen as a precedent ... then it would put them in the position where they copy and paste the other cases,'' said King, who has expressed concerns about massive fraud under Pigford.

    King said he has no evidence of fraud among Hispanics, women and Indians, but he said all claimants should have to prove they were wronged.

    "If there's discrimination, let's see the evidence of discrimination,'' he said.

    Some groups already are using the cases as a yardstick for their claims. The Pigford settlement provides a second round of payments for black farmers who missed an earlier deadline.

    "While we are very happy that African-American farmers have received some semblance of justice ... Hispanics are still waiting for their first opportunity to participate in a fair and just settlement,'' said Stephen Hill, lead attorney for the Hispanic farmers.

    Hill said the administration's $1.33 billion proposal to compensate Hispanic and women farmers falls short.

    Hispanic and women farmers together outnumber black farmers by a ratio of 2-to-1, but are expected to share roughly the same amount set aside under Pigford, Hill said.

    "On its face, it's discriminatory,'' he said.

    Vilsack said the Hispanic and female farmers' case is different from Pigford in part because the groups have not been certified as a class by the court. Their cases involve individual claims. There also isn't a directive from Congress to settle.

    Still, the Agriculture secretary said, officials hope to set up a system to resolve the claims.

    "We are hopeful that we will get that done very quickly,'' he said.

    Settlement talks for the Cobell and Pigford cases repeatedly stalled under previous presidents.

    "This is an administration that said its number one commitment is to civil rights and I believe that," said Barbara Arnwine, executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, which has been involved in the Pigford case. "I know there's a lot on the docket ... (but) you can't walk around and say, 'This house is clean' when you have all these cases still building.''
    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...-black-farmers

    here's a question- will obama ever sign a bill to bring long awaited justice to the victims of affirmative action because of unfair treatment by both federal and local governments???

    those qualified people who lost out on jobs, job promotions, college admission, college tuition assitance, etc, etc based on affirmative actions and its' discrimnatory practices- will they ever see justice???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY View Post
    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...-black-farmers

    here's a question- will obama ever sign a bill to bring long awaited justice to the victims of affirmative action because of unfair treatment by both federal and local governments???

    those qualified people who lost out on jobs, job promotions, college admission, college tuition assitance, etc, etc based on affirmative actions and its' discrimnatory practices- will they ever see justice???
    Oh boy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY View Post
    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...-black-farmers

    here's a question- will obama ever sign a bill to bring long awaited justice to the victims of affirmative action because of unfair treatment by both federal and local governments???

    those qualified people who lost out on jobs, job promotions, college admission, college tuition assitance, etc, etc based on affirmative actions and its' discrimnatory practices- will they ever see justice???
    lol - we all know the answer to that one.

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    Social Justice.

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    did you guys even read the article?

    these were class action lawsuits that the gov't lost or were in the process of losing.

    this is just paying for the settlement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by quantum View Post
    lol - we all know the answer to that one.
    The $4.6 billion measure passed by Congress last month will settle class-action lawsuits to pay thousands of black farmers and American Indians and, as Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack put it, "right past wrongs."
    there are thousands of other active class action lawsuits by qualified fireman, qualified policeman, etc who were discriminated against and lost out to lesser qualified individuals based on race....the new haven firefighter case just one of many...

    now that the pandora's box has been opened by obozo, let's see this congress pass more measures to settle those suits and right the wrong for those qualified indivduals...

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    FIGHT THE POWER!

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    the timing is ironic.....

    Judge upholds California's affirmative action ban
    Associated Press
    Posted: 12/09/2010 07:11:55 AM PST
    Updated: 12/09/2010 07:23:31 AM PST


    SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal judge on Wednesday dismissed a lawsuit challenging California's voter-approved ban on affirmative action in public university admissions.

    U.S. District Judge Samuel Conti ruled against the challenge to Proposition 209, which barred racial, ethnic or gender preferences in public education, employment and contracting.

    The plaintiffs argued that the law violated the civil rights of black, Latino and Native American students whose numbers have been reduced at the University of California's most prestigious campuses, particularly UCLA and UC Berkeley, since the ban passed in 1996. what about the civil rights of qualfied people turned away because they were not black, latino or native Americans?? forgot- their rights don't count....

    According to the lawsuit, black, Latino and Native American students make up about one-quarter of the freshmen enrolled at UC's nine undergraduate campuses even though they comprise nearly half of all public high school graduates.

    But the judge sided with Ward Connelly and other affirmative-action opponents who sought the lawsuit's dismissal. In his ruling, Conti said the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals already rejected a similar legal challenge to California's affirmative-action ban.

    Connelly, a former UC Regent and Sacramento businessman, called the ruling a "powerful victory for fundamental rights."

    "Everyone is owed a full measure of equal treatment, including applicants to the UC system, and indeed all students," Connelly said in a statement. "None of us should be classified by race or sex, by government."

    The lawsuit was filed by the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, the group By Any Means Necessary and 56 California high school and college students.

    Yvette Felarca, a national organizer with BAMN, said her group plans to appeal the ruling and seek support from Gov.-elect Jerry Brown, who opposes the affirmative-action ban.

    "We're not going to stop our fight to end the increasing racial inequality and segregation that Proposition 209 has created," Felarca said. "We cannot have an apartheid-like admissions system in California."

    UC spokesman Steve Montiel said university attorneys were not available for comment Wednesday.

    In August, the California Supreme Court also upheld the state's affirmative action ban, rejecting arguments from the city of San Francisco and then-Attorney General Jerry Brown that the law violates federal equality protections.
    http://www.contracostatimes.com/news...nclick_check=1
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 12-09-2010 at 12:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY View Post
    there are thousands of other active class action lawsuits by qualified fireman, qualified policeman, etc who were discriminated against and lost out to lesser qualified individuals based on race....the new haven firefighter case just one of many...

    now that the pandora's box has been opened by obozo, let's see this congress pass more measures to settle those suits and right the wrong for those qualified indivduals...
    This was a class action suit vs. USDA, the cases you are talking about are local and/or state lawsuits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cr726 View Post
    This was a class action suit vs. USDA, the cases you are talking about are local and/or state lawsuits.
    the New Haven firefighters case was a lawsuit, albeit a bias lawsuit, that made it to the SC....as stated- the pandora's box has been open....Steven King points out:

    But Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa worries that the Pigford settlement could pave the way for other claims that would cost U.S. taxpayers additional billions of dollars.

    "If Pigford is seen as a precedent ... then it would put them in the position where they copy and paste the other cases,'' said King, who has expressed concerns about massive fraud under Pigford.

    King said he has no evidence of fraud among Hispanics, women and Indians, but he said all claimants should have to prove they were wronged.

    "If there's discrimination, let's see the evidence of discrimination,'' he said.
    the next natural step is other groups who feel they've been discriminated against because of laws such as AA, and have lost $$$ because of that discrimination following suit and using this as precedent....in fact its being encouraged by this group:

    "It paves the way for justice'' for other disenfranchised groups, said John Boyd, president of the National Black Farmers Association, which has led the decade-long effort. "Hopefully, other minorities will see a smoother path. ... They've been waiting many, many years for justice, too.''
    --------------

    That action followed a $760 million case the administration settled in October with Indian farmers, and agreements with four tribes to settle long-standing disputes over water rights.
    hence California farmers should be entitled to damages in their long-standing disputes over water rights with the feds...

    http://www.economist.com/node/14699639
    Last edited by Come Back to NY; 12-09-2010 at 02:11 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Come Back to NY View Post
    the New Haven firefighters case was a lawsuit, albeit a bias lawsuit, that made it to the SC....as stated- the pandora's box has been open....Steven King points out:



    the next natural step is other groups who feel they've been discriminated against because of laws such as AA, and have lost $$$ because of that discrimination following suit and using this as precedent....in fact its being encouraged by this group:



    --------------



    hence California farmers should be entitled to damages in their long-standing disputes over water rights with the feds...

    http://www.economist.com/node/14699639
    It does matter who you are suing, hence why congress had to agree to the package. The Supreme Court hearing a case is a big deal, but it doesn't matter who the plantiff nor defendant is for it to make it to the Supreme Court.

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    Hey i am catholic, there were signs no catholics need apply. I want justice!
    How about justice for chinese and japanese! Get over it already!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MnJetFan View Post
    Hey i am catholic, there were signs no catholics need apply. I want justice!
    How about justice for chinese and japanese! Get over it already!
    Being ignorant is a big part of the problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MnJetFan View Post
    Hey i am catholic, there were signs no catholics need apply. I want justice!
    How about justice for chinese and japanese! Get over it already!
    Exactly! Suck it up, wussies!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reparat...d_West_Germany

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