Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: A Perfect Example of What is Wrong with Unaccoutable Government

  1. #21
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Van down by the river
    Posts
    22,746
    [QUOTE=isired;3956661][IMG]http://msnbcmedia2.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photo_StoryLevel/080617/080617-bottled2-hmed-9a.grid-6x2.jpg[/IMG][IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3635/3416579846_0245ff0dc6.jpg[/IMG][IMG]http://www.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/outoftown/arizona/phoenix/costco/03water.jpg[/IMG]
    [/QUOTE]

    Nuts, bro. Plain water wrapped in plastic and then wrapped in more plastic.

    I think if there was ever a single symbol of today's societal ignorance and excess, it'd have to be bottled water.

  2. #22
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    11,569
    agreed. we do the large brita fridge thing and sigg bottles...

  3. #23
    [QUOTE=Warfish;3956441]Can you explain the difference between a Civil Service Office Manager and a Publicly Traded Company Office Manager, in terms of why one is "real experience" and the other is not.

    Thanks.[/QUOTE]

    I'll take a crack at it.

    First of all the Publicly Traded Company Office Manager has zero job securty and can be let go at any time. So, it is in their self interest to be of value to the company. The Civil Servant has all the protections afforded by the Civil Service Commissiona and can not be fired except for "wilful misconduct", incompetence is not enough.

    Second, the publicly traded company probably has a 401k with a 2 to 4% match and it may take the employee up to 7 years to "vest" and "earn" the match. The Civil Servant likely has, in addition to a 401k, a "taxpayer" funded pension plan which becomes fully vested after 20 years or so allowing them to retire before age 60, if they desire.

    The Publicly Traded Company Office Manager will only advance further (and likely only advanced to Office Manager) by doing better work than his/her peers and being a better candidate than people available on the open job market. The Civil Servant advanced because they "did their time" and he/she was the most senior person interested in the posted job-opening which had to be kept "in house".
    Last edited by SONNY WERBLIN; 02-16-2011 at 09:10 AM.

  4. #24
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    742 Evergreen Terrace
    Posts
    11,110
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;3956684]Nuts, bro. Plain water wrapped in plastic and then wrapped in more plastic.

    I think if there was ever a single symbol of today's societal ignorance and excess, it'd have to be bottled water.[/QUOTE]

    [URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IdobyzkBio"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IdobyzkBio[/URL]

  5. #25
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    18,374
    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;3960319]I'll take a crack at it.

    First of all the Publicly Traded Company Office Manager has zero job securty and can be let go at any time. So, it is in their self interest to be of value to the company. The Civil Servant has all the protections afforded by the Civil Service Commissiona and can not be fired except for "wilful misconduct", incompetence is not enough.

    Second, the publicly traded company probably has a 401k with a 2 to 4% match and it may take the employee up to 7 years to "vest" and "earn" the match. The Civil Servant likely has, in addition to a 401k, a "taxpayer" funded pension plan which becomes fully vested after 20 years or so allowing them to retire before age 60, if they desire.

    The Publicly Traded Company Office Manager will only advance further (and likely only advanced to Office Manager) by doing better work than his/her peers and being a better candidate than people available on the open job market. The Civil Servant advanced because they "did their time" and he/she was the most senior person interested in the posted job-opening which had to be kept "in house".[/QUOTE]

    That's a start but I believe the "pressure" on a private employed person is much greater as well. Move down into the 100 employee companies and it gets even greater in disparity.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us