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Thread: What are you reading/What have you read recently? (merged)

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Harris View Post
    Ok. What exactly is a "graphic novel"?
    More or less a comic book, but generally longer and with a more complex story line. Watchmen is mind-blowing if you haven't already read it.

    I just started reading some stuff by James Patterson. Not groundbreaking but a light and entertaining read.

  2. #82
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    I haven't read it for a few years but I picked up Angels & Demons again for obvious reasons...

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Harris View Post
    Team of Rivals - lives up to the hype but a little too much emphasis on the million or so players in the politics of Lincoln's cabinet and the Union gov't, not enough (for me) on the specific battles though I understand it's beyond the intended scope.
    I'm reading it now too. Great book!

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jets Things View Post
    "Brisingr," by Christopher Paolini - third book in his Inheritance Cycle. Pretty awesome so far.
    I'm on page 100 now. Great books. I shut my eyes and pretended there was no such horrible movie to ruin my imagination of the books. I refuse to even look at that disaster. I only delve into fantasy from time to time but GREAT Story!

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCappy View Post
    More or less a comic book, but generally longer and with a more complex story line. Watchmen is mind-blowing if you haven't already read it.

    I just started reading some stuff by James Patterson. Not groundbreaking but a light and entertaining read.
    Patterson is the best for quick and light with a good plot. You'll been done with any of his books in two/three days...

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by brady's a catcher View Post
    Just started the Watchmen graphic novel. Heard it was incredible.
    I thought it was fun and different. Very graphic! Haven't watched the movie yet. I hear they took out the best part. IMO the whole Pirate novel in the novel thing.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by HessStation View Post
    I thought it was fun and different. Very graphic! Haven't watched the movie yet. I hear they took out the best part. IMO the whole Pirate novel in the novel thing.
    The movie without that part is roughly 3 hours. They released the pirate part on a separate DVD (with Gerald Butler from 300..heh) and it runs a little over an hour in itself. When the DVD for the movie itself comes out it will be added with the directors cut along with some other stuff taken out due to time...is supposed to run close to 5 hours The movie in itself was good though if you don't mind the length.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by I against I View Post
    Ken Follett "The Pillars of the Earth"
    I'm reading it now. I'm about 1/3 of the way through now. So far outstanding.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    I'm reading it now. I'm about 1/3 of the way through now. So far outstanding.
    Agreed. The sequel wasn't quite up to par as Pillars, but worth the read anyway.

    If you like period pieces, Louis L'Amour's 'The Walking Drum' is not far behind Pillars, IMHO. It was quite a departure from his westerns.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by frostlich View Post
    If you like period pieces, Louis L'Amour's 'The Walking Drum' is not far behind Pillars, IMHO. It was quite a departure from his westerns.
    It's funny how some authors can get away from their typical genres and just hit a home run. John Grishan is known for his lawyer thrillers but I just finished A Painted House, a story about a rural Arkaansas family in the 50's. So good, maybe the best pure Americana book I've ever read.

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    It's funny how some authors can get away from their typical genres and just hit a home run. John Grishan is known for his lawyer thrillers but I just finished A Painted House, a story about a rural Arkaansas family in the 50's. So good, maybe the best pure Americana book I've ever read.
    Funny you mention John Grisham. I read 'Playing for Pizza' a few months ago-worth a bit of light reading over the weekend. I can't get into his laywer books though. I'll have to check out 'A Painted House'.

  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCappy View Post
    More or less a comic book, but generally longer and with a more complex story line. Watchmen is mind-blowing if you haven't already read it.

    I just started reading some stuff by James Patterson. Not groundbreaking but a light and entertaining read.
    It'll be nice to branch out, I'll pick it up.

  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by frostlich View Post
    I'll have to check out 'A Painted House'.
    Before this, I hadn't read a single Grisham novel, so I knew nothing about him.
    It's hard to explain why I enjoyed the book so much, it's certainly not as jaw-dropping as Pillars, but there is such an effortless flow to the writing and you really feel you can see the town and characters.

    After I read A Painted House I began a Dan Brown novel. Ugh, I guess Brown's known for his twists and turns, but his writing style is so stilted and boring in a "he said-she said" sort of way. I appreciated Grisham even more
    while reading Brown.

  14. #94
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    The Unofficial What Are You Reading Thread?

    Based on a recommendation from Hess Station, I picked up Lamb, the Gospel Accorcing to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christoper Moore. Pretty entertaining so far, a satiric look at the life of Christ NOT chronichled in the other Gospels.

    Two solid recent recommendations:

    City of Thieves by David Benioff, historical fiction about WWII set in and around Leningrad. Pretty quick read, but a VERY good one at that. Nazis versus Russians, told from the viewpoint of two youths tasked to find a dozen eggs for a Colonel's daughter's wedding or be executed.

    The Given Day by Dennis Lehane (Gone Baby Gone, Mystic River, Shutter Island). Not his usual pulp fiction, historical fiction/epic novel about Boston circa 1919, the end of WWI, the flu pandemic, the Boston police strike, unionization, race relations, Babe Ruth, anarchists and bombings, the Great Molases Disaster. Great character development, pretty good read.

    Not the beast I've read in the last 5 years, but the better ones I've read in the past few months.

    You?
    Last edited by JStokes; 03-08-2010 at 08:26 PM.

  15. #95
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    Nothing currently, haven't had time, but the last book I read was The Chris Farley Show. Good book, written by his brother with stories about him from David Spade, Chevy Chase, Chris Rock, Adam Sandler etc. Very entertaining, but also very sad. Chris Farley led a rather depressing life....

  16. #96
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    Currently, I'm reading Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson. An interesting biography that is presented as kind of an "oral" history -- it's comprised of little stories, comments, and vignettes from people who knew Hunter best. It's edited by Jann Werner the original editor of Rolling Stone who got to know HST from way back.

    I always knew that HST was a nut, but I had no idea as to the depths of his alcoholism, drug addiction, and general insanity. Crazy stuff. Very, very interesting.

  17. #97
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    I started reading Anthony bourdains book kitchen confidential. It is great really awesome insight on the life of a chef and the restaurant business...just a really good story teller...and i got Too Fat to Fish by Artie Lange from the Howard Stern Show...ill probably start eading that this weekend when im dont with bourdains book.

  18. #98
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    A Sharepoint 2010 whitepaper - ugh

  19. #99
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    I tend to work my way through several books at once. This is what I'm reading now:

    Infinite Jest: David Foster Wallace
    At 981 pages, this one is going to take a while, but I love a good challenge. His writing style is very unique, with an attention to detail I've never experienced before. He spends pages describing the setting of a scene, before even getting into dialogue. Very dense, but very enjoyable so far.

    The Fall: Albert Camus

    Nausea: Jean-Paul Sartre

    Both short books, about 100 pages each, these two french authors had a philosophical rivalry back in the 1930s. I wanted to read a book from each just for the experience.

    Selected Stories: O. Henry
    I bought a collection of O. Henry's short stories to appease my short attention span and to break the monotony of Infinite Jest, which is going to take me months to finish. In 4 to 6 pages, O. Henry manages to develop characters, introduce a dilemma, add a twist, and teach us a lesson. I love his style.

    Kitchen Confidential Anthony Bourdain
    I'm a foodie, and seriously considering getting into the culinary industry once I make enough money to afford tuition at a culinary school. He's one of my favorite guys in the business and love his candid approach to talking about the food industry.
    Last edited by Crease29; 03-08-2010 at 09:22 PM.

  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by JStokes View Post
    the Great Molases Disaster. Great character development, pretty good read.

    I tried to draw FF2@ into a "great molasses disaster" riff years ago with no success.

    I'm reading "Orangatan" by Colin Broderick.

    Kind of limited appeal to NY DOnkeys off the boat...

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