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Thread: Pakistan

  1. #41
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    Guess what????

    The Paki-holes are getting 3 billion dollars from us this year!!!



    F*ck those a**holes.


    Haven't heard one "fiscally responsible" sh*thead politician mention saving our country 3 billion by refusing to hand over our money to countries that blatently harbor terrorists. Weird.

  2. #42
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4020144]that's kinda the point. we wouldn't know

    and as a side note i've seen people refer to the Bin ladin as a mansion or a luxury compound

    have ya seen the pictures? it's a big sh}t shack[/QUOTE]

    Are you seriously denying that Pakistan which is run by the military and the ISI aren't harboring terrorist?

    This was written while Osama was still dining on Pakistan's finest goat balls.

    [url]http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/29/world/29petraeus.html?ref=davidhpetraeus[/url]

    [QUOTE]Move to C.I.A. Puts Petraeus in Conflict With Pakistan

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — The appointment of Gen. David H. Petraeus as director of the Central Intelligence Agency puts him more squarely than ever in conflict with Pakistan, whose military leadership does not regard him as a friend and where he will now have direct control over the armed drone campaign that the Pakistani military says it wants stopped.

    Pakistani and American officials said that General Petraeus’s selection could further inflame relations between the two nations, which are already at one of their lowest points, with recriminations over myriad issues aired publicly like never before.

    The usually secretive leader of the Pakistani Army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, has made little secret of his distaste for General Petraeus, calling him a political general. [B]General Petraeus has privately expressed outrage at what American officials say is the Pakistani main spy agency’s most blatant support yet for fighters based in Pakistan who are carrying out attacks against American troops in Afghanistan. [/B]

    Officials on both sides say they expect the two nations’ relationship to become increasingly adversarial as they maneuver the endgame in Afghanistan, where Pakistan and the United States have deep — and conflicting — security interests.

    Repairing the frayed ties between the C.I.A. and Pakistan’s primary spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, will be difficult, American officials say. [B]“In its current form, the relationship is almost unworkable,” said Dennis C. Blair, a former American director of national intelligence. “There has to be a major restructuring. The ISI jams the C.I.A. all it wants and pays no penalties.” [/B]

    One American military official sought to play down the animosity with Pakistani officials, noting that the general had regularly met with the Pakistanis for nearly three years, most recently on Monday. Still, the official acknowledged that with General Petraeus leading the C.I.A., “the pressure may be more strategic, deliberate and focused — to the extent that it can be.”

    A Pakistani official described the mounting tensions as a game of “brinkmanship,” with both Adm. Mike Mullen, who as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff has been the Obama administration’s point man on Pakistan policy, and General Kayani growing impatient because they have little to show for the many hours they have invested during more than two dozen visits over the past three years.

    [B]Admiral Mullen surprised Pakistani officials by publicly accusing the ISI of sheltering fighters from the Haqqani network, a Taliban ally that has long served as a proxy for Pakistan’s military and intelligence establishment in Afghanistan. American commanders in eastern Afghanistan say they have killed or captured more than 5,000 militants in the past year, but fighters continue to pour across the border from sanctuaries in Pakistan to Paktia, Khost and Paktika Provinces in Afghanistan. [/B]

    In a private meeting here in Islamabad last week, Admiral Mullen told General Kayani that the C.I.A. would not reduce the drone strikes until Pakistan launched a military operation against the Haqqani network in Pakistan’s tribal areas, an American official said, pleas that the admiral has been making for the past two years with nothing to show for them.

    Pakistan’s military and its intelligence agency are increasingly embarrassed by the United States’ drone campaign, which they publicly condemn but quietly allow. They have asked the C.I.A. to remove its personnel from Shamsi air base, about 200 miles southwest of Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan Province, where some of the drones are based, a senior American official said.

    The withdrawal has not occurred but is expected soon, the official said. The drone attacks would then be flown out of Afghanistan, where some of them are already based, the official said.

    There have also been sharp disagreements over a proposed code of conduct that would define what American soldiers and intelligence agents can do in Pakistani territory, a Pakistani official said. The Pakistanis have, for now, dropped the idea of such an accord, fearing that the Americans are looking for “legal cover” for intelligence operatives like Raymond A. Davis, the C.I.A. contractor who killed two Pakistanis in January, a Pakistani official said.

    “The relationship between the two countries is very tense right now,” said Representative William M. Thornberry of Texas, a senior Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, who visited Pakistan last week. “And the Pakistan government fuels the anti-American public opinion to increase pressure on us.”

    [B]Newly disclosed documents obtained by WikiLeaks have also stoked tensions. One of them, from the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, lists the ISI along with numerous militant groups as allies of Al Qaeda and the Taliban, an indication of how deep American suspicions run when it comes to Pakistani intelligence. The document is undated but appears to be from 2007 or 2008. [/B]



    A former general said the alliance established after 9/11 to get rid of Al Qaeda on Pakistani soil was built on shaky ground, with few aligning interests beyond stopping the terrorist group. Tensions over issues big and small — like accounting for American grants to the Pakistani military and the failure of the United States to deliver helicopters that would help in counterterrorism efforts — clouded the hastily arranged alliance from the start, he said.


    But now the collision of interests over how to end the war in Afghanistan, and the bitterness over the Davis affair, have exposed deep-seated differences, he said.

    The drone campaign, which the C.I.A. has run against militants in Pakistan’s tribal areas since 2004, will now become the preserve of General Petraeus, and it has moved to center stage, at least for the Pakistanis. Since Mr. Davis’s release from custody in Pakistan after the killings, the C.I.A. has carried out three drone attacks, each one seemingly tied to sensitive events in the United States-Pakistan relationship and aimed at Afghan Taliban militants that Pakistan shelters.

    The day after Admiral Mullen left Pakistan last week, a drone attack in North Waziristan killed 23 people associated with Hafiz Gul Barhadur, whose forces are fighting NATO in Afghanistan. Earlier in April, after Lt. Gen. Ahmad Shuja Pasha, the ISI chief, left Washington, a drone attacked another group of Afghan Taliban.

    Another former Pakistani general who speaks to General Kayani said he believed that the Pakistan Army’s leader had concluded that the drone campaign should end because it hurt the army’s reputation among the Pakistani public. Those being killed by the drones are of midlevel or even lesser importance, the general said.

    The Americans say the drones are more important than ever as a tool to stanch the flow of Taliban foot soldiers coming across the border to fight American and NATO forces.

    [B]The easy access into Afghanistan was on full display last week in Wana, the main town of South Waziristan, according to a local resident.

    There, militants loyal to Maulvi Nazir, a Taliban leader who maintains a peace agreement with the Pakistani military and whose forces often cross into Afghanistan, showed high morale and were moving around freely in front of the Pakistani Army, the resident said. “It looked,” he said, “as though the army was giving them a free hand.”[/B][/QUOTE]

    The ISI and the Pakistani Army which run the country use terrorists to attack India, keep Afganistan unstable and assinate Judges and other officials in Pakistan. They have given our enemies sanctuary to attack us at will for 10 years now. Ossama was essentially a guest of the Pakistani ISI.

  3. #43
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    No doubt that they were hosting that murderer. Obama knows this and therefore did not involve them. Cut the funds already

  4. #44
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4020144]that's kinda the point. we wouldn't know

    and as a side note i've seen people refer to the Bin ladin as a mansion or a luxury compound

    have ya seen the pictures? it's a big sh}t shack[/QUOTE]

    There is literally ZERO chance someone builds a milti-million dollar compound with RPG carrying guards in Arlington or any other significant city with a similar military presence like Bin Laden did.

    It wasn't some temporary hideout he just jumped into. Dude built a fortress among a bunch of modest homes.

    Just like the mafia guys, for sure. JUST LIKE THEM :zzz:

  5. #45
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4020176]Are you seriously denying that Pakistan which is run by the military and the ISI aren't harboring terrorist?
    [/QUOTE]

    no im saying there's probably a 10% chance they were incompetent

    people are saying it's impossible that no knew about this luxury concrete mansion

    im saying nothing is impossible. It's implausible yes.

  6. #46
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    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYefHfokP44[/url]

    Hergy dergy dergy. Derpy derpy derpy derp. Hergy dergy derpy derp. Derp derp derp. Dergy derp.

    Derp.

  7. #47
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4020276]no im saying there's probably a 10% chance they were incompetent

    people are saying it's impossible that no knew about this luxury concrete mansion

    im saying nothing is impossible. It's implausible yes.[/QUOTE]

    THIS

    [QUOTE]Details of the comfortable family life Osama Bin Laden enjoyed under the noses of the Pakistani security services emerged last night.
    Neighbours’ children were invited into the terror mastermind’s hideout to play with pet rabbits, while his children attended a nearby school.

    [U]Even the name of the million-dollar house was a huge clue – it was called ‘Waziristan Mansion’, after the tribal area of mountainous Pakistan where Bin Laden fled in the wake of the 9/11 outrage.[/U] Until he was finally hunted down and killed by U.S. special forces on Sunday, the world’s most wanted man lived in the garrison city of Abbottabad with his various wives for an incredible six years.

    Further embarrassment followed yesterday when the BBC interviewed a 12-year-old boy who said he used to visit the building where Bin Laden had died and had met the Al Qaeda leader's family. 'I used to go to their house. He had [U]two wives, one spoke Arabic, and the other one spoke Urdu[/U]. They had three children, a girl and two boys. They gave me two rabbits. They had installed a [U]camera at the outer gate [/U]so they could see people before they entered the house,' Zarar Ahmed said.

    It also emerged today that other local children thought something may be amiss - and regularly made a profit from the presence of the terrorist mastermind. [U]'If a football went into bin Laden's compound the children would not be allowed to get it,' said local ice cream vendor Tanvir Ahmed.
    'They were given money instead; 100-150 rupees ($2-$3) per ball.'[/U]

    Another youngster, named Daniel Alvi, revealed that he regularly saw a man in a red Suzuki van drive into the compound with a live goat, while the milkman only delivered outside the security gate and never rang the doorbell.
    According to locals, [U]the vehicles would travel regularly to the tribal areas where Al Qaeda’s trainers and planners operate[/U].

    [U]'There was a rumour in the neighbourhood that the man who lived there was Baitullah Mehsud's nephew,' said Daniel, referring to the late chief of the Pakistani Taliban[/U].

    Two brothers from the compound visited the shops twice a week to buy provisions. Their regular purchases included large quantities of vegetables, fruit, rice, biscuits, jam, honey, ice cream and ice lollies for the children.

    Shopkeeper Raja Shuja said yesterday: ‘The brothers were always polite and always asked questions about what was happening locally and whether there had been strange visitors to the area.’

    Despite this, the compound, which was number 25 in the street, did not have most basic conveniences such as a satellite dish, phone line or air conditioning.

    Residents in the town were already making trips to the compound to examine what had happened and gathered atop the 15-foot walls - which previously [U]would have resulted in a person being asked to move on should anyone dare to lean on them[/U].

    Another local resident, Sher Mohammed Khan, said his sister went to the house to administer a polio vaccination as part of a government-backed drive.
    When she remarked on [U]all the expensive SUVs inside the compound[/U], a man immediately asked her to leave, but not before taking the vaccine to apparently administer to the children inside.

    [U]Another doctor was also believed to have made frequent visits to give Bin Laden dialysis for his kidney condition.[/U]

    Bin Laden, 54, is believed to have lived in the fortified mansion less than a mile from a military academy just 62 miles from the capital Islamabad for [U]six years.[/U]

    [U]The ISI had raided the compound once before in 2003 - when it was believed Abu Faraj al-Libi, was there[/U]. [/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1383067/Osama-Bin-Laden-dead-Pakistan-spy-agencys-failures-Abbottabad-hideout.html[/url]

    [IMG]http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/02/article-1382861-0BE037E000000578-240_634x320.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/03/article-1383067-0BE2777A00000578-965_634x330.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/03/article-1383067-0BE27BDB00000578-617_634x430.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/03/article-1383067-0BE2783D00000578-827_634x386.jpg[/IMG]

  8. #48
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    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;4019594]If by Mush. you mean Pervez Musharraf, he is not the President of Pakistan anymore. Asif Ali Zardari is the current President.[/QUOTE]

    Bhutto was his wife.

  9. #49
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    Pakistan is not a country with a military, it's a military with a country. Asif Ali Zardari while an Allie, is not in charge.

  10. #50
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    [QUOTE=sunmou;4020422]Bhutto was his wife.[/QUOTE]

    who was killed by al-Qaeda. The person who claimed responsibility for her assassination, Saeed al-Masri, was killed by an American drone airstrike in Pakistan almost a year ago.

  11. #51
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    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;4020308]

    [IMG]http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/02/article-1382861-0BE037E000000578-240_634x320.jpg[/IMG]

    [/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://img717.imageshack.us/img717/8881/25mill.jpg[/IMG]

  12. #52
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4020276]no im saying there's probably a 10% chance they were incompetent

    people are saying it's impossible that no knew about this luxury concrete mansion

    im saying nothing is impossible. It's implausible yes.[/QUOTE]

    In a technical sense of the word yes - nothing is impossible. Kind of like the old phrase "never say never" - But you are right it is implausible. I don't think everyone from top to bottom knew but I think enough people with enough power to cover it up knew.

  13. #53
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    Did OBL "build" this "mansion"? I mean, he went to a realtor, purchased the land, got a deed, then went to the Pakistani Building Department for a building permit to construct this house and walls? Really?

    C'mon, to say OBL built this place is a bit of a stretch, no? This place was probably built many years ago, and OBL was just hiding out in it. Since it was built in '72 (just a guess), it's probably not too hard to think the locals just thought of it as a place where some rich ahole lived. As for Pakistan having no idea OBL was there, that baffles me.

    Also, I don't think we should send one more dollar to Pakicrap, but I hear all our supply lines to Afganistan go through Pakistan. We cut off "aid" to Pakihole, then they say "no more moving supplies through our country for your war".

  14. #54
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4020276]

    people are saying it's impossible that no knew about this luxury concrete mansion

    [/QUOTE]

    I have no doubt the pakistanis knew he was there. But to use the words "luxury" and "mansion" describing that backwards eyesore is pretty funny stuff. My kid's treehouse is furnished better

  15. #55
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    [QUOTE=Tyler Durden;4020423]Pakistan is not a country with a military, it's a military with a country. Asif Ali Zardari while an Allie, is not in charge.[/QUOTE]

    this is an astute comment

    it's kind of a mess over there

  16. #56
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    [QUOTE=shakin318;4020669] But to use the words "luxury" and "mansion" describing that backwards eyesore is pretty funny stuff. My kid's treehouse is furnished better[/QUOTE]

    +1 sarcasm. it was a dump. ive seen people call it a luxury mansion... a stretch

  17. #57
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    [QUOTE=Tyler Durden;4020423]Pakistan is not a country with a military, it's a military with a country. Asif Ali Zardari while an Allie, is not in charge.[/QUOTE]

    This.

    And to suggest that the military or ISI thinks alike throughout the ranks is over simplifying it. It stretches the bounds of credibility to think no one in the ISI knew that OBL was there. But, there are many factions in the ISI that have loyalties to the Taliban and AQ and wouldn't act on that information.

  18. #58
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    [QUOTE=crasherino;4020750]This.

    And to suggest that the military or ISI thinks alike throughout the ranks is over simplifying it. It stretches the bounds of credibility to think no one in the ISI knew that OBL was there. But, there are many factions in the ISI that have loyalties to the Taliban and AQ and wouldn't act on that information.[/QUOTE]

    If the US notified Pakistan that they we're going to raid that compound, I'd bet you OBL would have been tipped off we were coming.

    That's probably why the US didn't notify Pakistan.

  19. #59
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    +1 on paulie's picture of people who lost out

    I suppose we could tell Pakistan: no more money, but we reserve the right to bomb the Badlands because you're harboring fighters crossing the border.

    Make any moves against us, and we help India beat you down?

  20. #60
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    [QUOTE=quantum;4020878]and we help India beat you down?[/QUOTE]

    Does India have a nuke?

    I'm sure we can spare a couple...

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