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Thread: U.S. Was Braced for Fight With Pakistanis in Bin Laden Raid

  1. #1
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    U.S. Was Braced for Fight With Pakistanis in Bin Laden Raid

    [B]U.S. Was Braced for Fight With Pakistanis in Bin Laden Raid[/B]
    By ERIC SCHMITT, THOM SHANKER and DAVID E. SANGER

    WASHINGTON — President Obama insisted that the assault force hunting down Osama bin Laden last week be large enough to fight its way out of Pakistan if confronted by hostile local police officers and troops, senior administration and military officials said Monday.

    In revealing additional details about planning for the mission, senior officials also said that two teams of specialists were on standby: One to bury Bin Laden if he was killed, and a second composed of lawyers, interrogators and translators in case he was captured alive. That team was set to meet aboard a Navy ship, most likely the aircraft carrier Carl Vinson in the North Arabian Sea.

    Mr. Obama’s decision to increase the size of the force sent into Pakistan shows that he was willing to risk a military confrontation with a close ally in order to capture or kill the leader of Al Qaeda.

    Such a fight would have set off an even larger breach with the Pakistanis than has taken place since officials in Islamabad learned that helicopters filled with members of a Navy Seals team had flown undetected into one of their cities, and burst into a compound where Bin Laden was hiding.

    One senior Obama administration official, pressed on the rules of engagement for one of the riskiest clandestine operations attempted by the C.I.A. and the military’s Joint Special Operations Command in many years, said: “Their instructions were to avoid any confrontation if at all possible. But if they had to return fire to get out, they were authorized to do it.”

    The planning also illustrates how little the administration trusted the Pakistanis as they set up their operation. They also rejected a proposal to bring the Pakistanis in on the mission.

    Under the original plan, two assault helicopters were going to stay on the Afghanistan side of the border waiting for a call if they were needed. But the aircraft would have been about 90 minutes away from the Bin Laden compound.

    About 10 days before the raid, Mr. Obama reviewed the plans and pressed his commanders as to whether they were taking along enough forces to fight their way out if the Pakistanis arrived on the scene and tried to interfere with the operation.

    That resulted in the decision to send two more helicopters carrying additional troops. These followed the two lead Black Hawk helicopters that carried the actual assault team. While there was no confrontation with the Pakistanis, one of those backup helicopters was ultimately brought in to the scene of the raid when a Black Hawk was damaged while making a hard landing.

    “Some people may have assumed we could talk our way out of a jam, but given our difficult relationship with Pakistan right now, the president did not want to leave anything to chance,” said one senior administration official, who like others would not be quoted by name describing details of the secret mission. “He wanted extra forces if they were necessary.”

    With tensions between the United States and Pakistan escalating since the raid, American officials on Monday sought to tamp down the divisions and pointed to some encouraging developments.

    A United States official said that American investigators would soon be allowed to interview Bin Laden’s three widows, now being held by Pakistani authorities, a demand that Mr. Obama’s national security adviser, Thomas E. Donilon, made on television talk shows on Sunday.

    American officials say the widows, as well as a review of the trove of documents and other data the Seals team collected from the raid, could reveal important details, not only about Bin Laden’s life and activities since he fled into Pakistan from Afghanistan in 2001, but also information about Qaeda plots, personnel and planning.

    “We believe that it is very important to maintain the cooperative relationship with Pakistan precisely because it’s in our national security interest to do so,” said the White House spokesman, Jay Carney.

    In an effort to help mend the latest rupture in relations, the C.I.A. director, Leon E. Panetta, will talk soon with his counterpart, Lt. Gen. Ahmad Shuja Pasha, head of the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, or ISI, “to discuss the way forward in the common fight against Al Qaeda,” an American official said.

    On Sunday, Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, called the Pakistani Army chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani. “Mullen just wanted to check in with him,” said an American military official. “The conversation was civil, but sober, given the pressure that the general is under right now.”

    In describing the mission, the officials said that American surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft were watching and listening to how Pakistan’s police forces and military responded to the raid. That determined how long the commandos could safely remain on the ground going through the compound collecting computer hard drives, thumb drives and documents.

    American forces were under strict orders to avoid engaging with any Pakistani forces that responded to the commotion at the Bin Laden compound, senior administration officials said.

    If a confrontation appeared imminent, there were contingency plans for senior American officials, including Admiral Mullen, to call their Pakistani counterparts to avert an armed clash.

    But when he reviewed the plans, Mr. Obama voiced concern that this was not enough to protect the troops on the mission, administration officials said.

    In planning for the possible capture of Bin Laden, officials decided they would take him aboard a Navy ship to preclude battles over jurisdiction.

    The plan, officials said, was to do an initial interrogation for any information that might prevent a pending attack or identify the location of other Qaeda leaders.

    “There was a heck of a lot of planning that went into this for almost any and all contingencies, including capture,” one senior administration official said.

    In the end, the team organized to handle his death was called into duty. They did a quick forensics study of the body, washed it, and buried it at sea.

    But the officials acknowledged that the mission always was weighted toward killing, given the possibility that Bin Laden would be armed or wearing an explosive vest.

    [url]http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/10/world/asia/10intel.html?_r=1&ref=world[/url]

  2. #2
    So this place is about an hour away from where the President of Pakistan lives, does not say much for their radar or airforce that several Blackhawks are able to fly in undetected and raid a compound. The raid apparently took 40mins. Yet Pakistan knew nothing about it until it was over???

    Sorry I don't buy this.

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=MACPAC;4025717]So this place is about an hour away from where the President of Pakistan lives, does not say much for their radar or airforce that several Blackhawks are able to fly in undetected and raid a compound. The raid apparently took 40mins. Yet Pakistan knew nothing about it until it was over???

    Sorry I don't buy this.[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/05/army-mission-helocopter-was-secret-stealth-black-hawk-050411/[/url]

    Not everything is a conspiracy....

  4. #4
    Moreover, I am sure that the radar systems were jammed or blocked

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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg;4025725]Moreover, I am sure that the radar systems were jammed or blocked[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcArnepkhv0[/url]

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=MACPAC;4025717]So this place is about an hour away from where the President of Pakistan lives, does not say much for their radar or airforce that several Blackhawks are able to fly in undetected and raid a compound. The raid apparently took 40mins. Yet Pakistan knew nothing about it until it was over???

    Sorry I don't buy this.[/QUOTE]

    Technology only exists for the other guys? Give me a break.

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4025720][url]http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/05/army-mission-helocopter-was-secret-stealth-black-hawk-050411/[/url]

    Not everything is a conspiracy....[/QUOTE]

    A stealth Blackhawk helocopter you say :rolleyes:

    No way I am buying that Pakistan did not know this was going down.

    While many look at Pakistan as a 3rd world country their airforce/radar is second to none. They are paranoid that India is going to attack. If it is this easy to get into Pakistan I expect India to go into Pakistan and Kidnap the President anyday.

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=MACPAC;4025784]A stealth Blackhawk helocopter you say :rolleyes:
    [/QUOTE]


    the stealth copters flying low probably don't show on their radar. dont you read ARMY TIMES?

    [quote]
    If the radar-evading technology worked, it “would be a true statement” to say that the use of the low-observable Black Hawks was evidence that the United States gave Pakistani authorities no advance warning of the mission, the retired special operations aviator added.[/quote]

    if the pakistanis knew it was going down it was just as likely someone in the ISI sold out Bin Ladin.

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4025720][url]http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/05/army-mission-helocopter-was-secret-stealth-black-hawk-050411/[/url]

    Not everything is a conspiracy....[/QUOTE]



    I agree. I am not saying it is. Big stretch.

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=MACPAC;4025784]A stealth Blackhawk helocopter you say :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE][url]http://www.newser.com/story/118361/pakistan-may-give-china-access-to-downed-stealth-helicopter.html[/url]

    The stealth chopper that didn't make it back from the Osama bin Laden raid is giving Pakistan a little diplomatic revenge. Pakistani officials made a point to tell ABC News they might let China "take a look" at the super-secret helicopter, which had to be left behind after a rough landing. US forces tried to destroy it before leaving, but charred sections remained.

    Pakistan has a cozy relationship with Beijing, and it's likely that Chinese officials will be allowed to look all they want, writes Josh Voorhees at Slate. "But by publicly suggesting that nothing is a done deal yet, the comments provide Pakistan with another chance to save face at home by taking a defiant stance toward Washington." Click for more, or to read President Obama's joke about donating the "$60 million helicopter." Reuters published photos of the chopper wreckage, along with grisly ones of victims. [/QUOTE]

    Islamabad needs to be turned to rubble. :yes:

  11. #11
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    Funny - I haven't read anything about opposition to the way OBL was taken out: no ACLU, no media pundits, no college demonstrations against "cowboy diplomacy".


    What the hell is going on here?

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE][url]http://www.newser.com/story/118273/pakistan-vows-to-attack-future-us-incursions.html[/url]


    The assassination of Osama Bin Laden has resulted in a mixture of anger, and embarrassment from the Pakistani government.

    In recent days, anger has begun to become the dominant emotion.

    Fears of another US strike are prevalent after a report that Ayman al Zawahiri, the second hand man of Bin Laden, may be in Pakistan.

    The possibility of another US incursion led Pakistan’s Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani to say to the Pakistani Parliament, "“Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate with full force. No one should underestimate the resolve and capability of our nation and armed forces to defend our sacred homeland.”

    Gilani went on to warn against any attacks on the Pakistani nuclear arsenal.

    Summing up the current state of American-Pakistani relations, Richard Haas, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, told CNN: “At best, we’re a limited partner and often the emphasis should be on the word ‘limited’ rather than ‘partner.’ It makes the American military and the American intelligence services incredibly suspicious of their Pakistani counterparts.”[/QUOTE]


    [B][SIZE="6"]BWA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA!!!!![/SIZE][/B]

    "Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate with full force. No one should underestimate the resolve and capability of our nation and armed forces to defend our sacred homeland"

    You go ahead and do that, you morons.

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4026183][B][SIZE="6"]BWA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA!!!!![/SIZE][/B]

    "Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate with full force. No one should underestimate the resolve and capability of our nation and armed forces to defend our sacred homeland"

    You go ahead and do that, you morons.[/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://jkbaker.com/gallery/d/583-1/nuke.gif[/IMG]

    Bring it on.....:yes:

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4026183][B][SIZE="6"]BWA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA!!!!![/SIZE][/B]

    "Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate with full force. No one should underestimate the resolve and capability of our nation and armed forces to defend our sacred homeland"

    You go ahead and do that, you morons.[/QUOTE]

    I sincerely hope nobody in Pakistan's government is stupid enough to give the order for an attack US troops on their soil. We have a lot more terrorists to kill now that we know they're not hanging out in a cave on the border. We'll be back soon guys :byebye:

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