Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 54

Thread: Boston: An odyssey to enemy territory

  1. #1
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like

    Boston: An odyssey to enemy territory

    On Friday the gf and I flew up to Boston for a weekend getaway. Both of us had never been there before, and we didn't know what to expect. "Just a nice town with a serious inferiority complex, and a bunch of wicked retahded drunks. Nothing really special," was the prevailing thought.

    Well, after a 6 hour flight delay in Newark (horrendous), we touched down in Logan at 1AM after a quick 40 minute jump into the clouds.

    Our first excursion was to tour Fenway Park, and it was here that I really started to appreciate the culture of the city. Our tour guide was great, giving us some interesting historical factoids and tidbits, and throwing in good natured barbs against the Yanks along the way. My favorite aspects of Fenway that I did not previously know, were two things: 1) the grandstand seats. The oldest seats in baseball. We sat in them and man, were they cramped. Must be nuts during a game.

    [IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3289/5851102803_2e74b4df15_z.jpg[/IMG]

    Second: the one red seat in a sea of green that marks the longest homerun ever measured in the park, deposited there by Ted Williams. (a few rows under the Ford sign, an absolute monster shot)

    [IMG]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2793/5851654960_d7ab9f847b_z.jpg[/IMG]

    The area around Fenway is absolutely awesome. Great bars and stores and a fun atmosphere. Needless to say, nothing like the Bronx. And, truthfully, the ballpark is really special. It's 99 years old this year, and you can almost feel the history when you're walking around inside the bowels of the stadium. You just this is a special place. Sad to say, Yankee Stadium can't even compare to it.

    After the tour we went back downtown, and to our surprise it was the parade for the Stanley Cup champion Boston Bruins. Ahh, here was the wicked retahdedness I was imagining.

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5311/5851096577_995a44ee05_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5312/5851763022_aacd7bdc44_z.jpg[/IMG]

    Except it really wasn't With the exception of a few obnoxious drunks, the crowd was actually pretty easily manageable, and the city did a great job cleaning up the trash and confetti in a matter of a few hours.

    [IMG]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2748/5851208091_e00dbdc9a4_z.jpg[/IMG]

    We appreciated the fact that people were excited, and wondered what the place must have looked like when the Sox when in 2004. It was clear to see that sports is an integral part of the city's culture, and as a sports fan, I appreciated that. The city rallies around their teams with a passion that really isn't matched here in NY, probably because we have so many different options. Instead of choosing between 2 football teams, 2 baseball teams, 2 hockey teams, and soon to be 2 basketball teams, Boston fans are united around one common spirit for each sport.

    Not to say sports are the only contribution Boston has to culture, and historical significance, as you'll see coming up.

  2. #2
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    As a history buff, the most interesting thing to me is that Boston is truly the cornerstone of our nation's history. If Washington DC chronicles everything about our history from the 1780s to now, Boston covers the time period before that. After the parade settled down we decided to stroll long the Freedom Trail for a bit, a red line that cuts through the city and marks interesting historical places.

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5239/5853527584_9d0f70c7dc_z.jpg[/IMG]

    The city is filled to the brim with revolutionary history, including two cemeteries with centuries-old stones that are home to the final resting places of guys like Sam Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and other Founding Father heroes.

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5197/5851212915_dd820a2e0a_z.jpg[/IMG][IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5155/5853528636_ff282fe7e9_z.jpg[/IMG]

    Amazingly, many buildings that were built 300+ years ago still stand intact today; a modern city rose up around them but they held strong, and standing at the doorstep of these places bring you back to a times of dirt roads, horse drawn carriages, and cursing the dictatorial rule of a faraway monarch.

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5067/5853529682_b776943084_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5077/5852973035_4b43c36af1_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3177/5851758326_f125124ec7_z.jpg[/IMG]

    This is where, I believe, the real personality of Boston shines. This is an historic city, still appreciated as so after 300 years, and the city holds on to its heritage like a rare treasure.

  3. #3
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Westchester Co.
    Posts
    37,958
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=pauliec;4050922][IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5239/5853527584_9d0f70c7dc_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [/QUOTE]

    the chowds, and SAR, thank you for your efforts


    :D

  4. #4
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    18,353
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have been to Fenway a few times. Last time, Sept 2010 I sat in great seats with my JETS hat and I sat next to a "Self Proclaimed" veteran of Red Sox baseball. A true fan, all decked out in gear.


    I saw the 6 or so retired numbers and asked them who they were. I knew 3 off the top of my head. He couldn't tell me the others.

    I commented that a real fan would know. He asked about the Yankees and I rattled off each retired Yankee number in order....with NO WALL to look at.

    THAT is my memory of Boston Sports fans!

    OT....I was treated extremely well in Yawkey way. A SOX fan saw my JETS hat and bought me a beer!

  5. #5
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    凸(⊙▂⊙✖ )
    Posts
    30,982
    Post Thanks / Like
    Tourist.


    GFY




    :P

  6. #6
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    凸(⊙▂⊙✖ )
    Posts
    30,982
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=pauliec;4050922]

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5239/5853527584_9d0f70c7dc_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [/QUOTE]


    You might want to crop out your girls' feet....if not, just know that SAR will be fapping to that later...

  7. #7
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    The last day was comprised of slightly more modern stops. First, to Cambridge, to visit perhaps the most famous university in the country. Harvard encapsulates the spirit of Boston in a relatively small college campus: old buildings and somewhat of a self-aggrandizing understanding of history.

    [IMG]http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5101/5853320760_1f9e40f179_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3006/5852961397_663926fd02_z.jpg[/IMG]

    Even the statue of John Harvard is on par with some of the great founding father memorials:

    [IMG]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2642/5853317794_40f74e547e_z.jpg[/IMG]


    Finally, we ended our trip with a visit to the JFK Presidential Library. The gorgeous museum sits right on the Atlantic Ocean, a worthy tribute to sea-loving President. As a young, snot nosed punk, I never truly understood the appeal of the Kennedy Camelot, but after visiting this museum (designed obviously to trump the virtues of the Kennedy clan) I began to understand why Kennedy and his brother were such loved figures in the 1960s.

    By the end of the trip, I had a new appreciation for Boston. Compared to NY, the city is clean, relatively quiet, and somewhat of a throwback to the old days. Italians in the North End, Irish in the South, and a smattering of Asians thrown in -- but beyond that, it's not really gentrified at all. The streets are narrow and windy, there aren't many skyscrapers... it's almost as if this city is NY of the 1930s. While the culture of the United States continually changes in leaps and bounds, Boston stays pretty true to its roots, dating all the way back to the 1700s. And it seems like it will stay that way forever.

    Still, though, the passion for its sports teams cannot be ignored. Waiting for our plane back to Logan, I caught a glimpse of a welcoming sight, deep in enemy territory. The girl at the JetBlue desk rolled her eyes in disgust.

    [IMG]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2666/5853530400_4f775ff3d1_z.jpg[/IMG]

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    13,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Their fans are a bunch of sh!td!cks, but I can't deny that Boston is a great city.

    Next time try going to Salem in October. Pretty cool place.

  9. #9
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jerseystrong
    Posts
    18,571
    Post Thanks / Like
    I really miss that place.

    Nice recap Paulie.

    Did you get to Reginas?

  10. #10
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=Ruby2;4050946]I really miss that place.

    Nice recap Paulie.

    Did you get to Reginas?[/QUOTE]

    Didn't get a chance to, unfortunately. We weren't really in the North End at all.

  11. #11
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bergen County, NJ
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=Ruby2;4050946]I really miss that place.

    Nice recap Paulie.

    Did you get to [B]Reginas[/B]?[/QUOTE]

    The one in the North End :yes:

    Also, Giacomos in the North End--FF2 sent me there are it was great.

    I love Boston. If my daughter had to pick an area in the NE outside of the tri-state--I'm glad she picked there.

    Very nice recap Paulie. :yes:

    _

  12. #12
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bergen County, NJ
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=pauliec;4050948]Didn't get a chance to, unfortunately. We weren't really in the North End at all.[/QUOTE]

    Next time--it really is a great little area with a bunch of relly good restaurants--cool little winding streets.

    _
    Last edited by JStokes; 06-21-2011 at 01:04 PM.

  13. #13
    All League
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    4,054
    Post Thanks / Like
    Great posts and thread, Paulie. I actually lived in Southie for a few years after I got out of the Army. This was back in '98 and '99 (pre-Brady years). I used to walk around in a badass Chrebet jersey, it was a baseball jersey style shirt I got at a Reebok outlet in Jersey when I was making my Odessey TO Boston from Washington D.C. in a 1971 MG Midget that basically blew up somewhere in Connecticut...but thats another story.

    Anyway, I was an Irish-Catholic kid living in Southie, so I was pretty much accepted, even though I was from New York, and NOBODY cared about Football, the Pats, or that I always wore my Jets jersey around. Well, I thought the City was a great place, people don't get how small the City of Boston actually is. Its like a small town with amazing history, restarants, and bars. I loved living there, and have considered moving back to the area when I retire (my wife and I both HATE Florida). Its a clean city, with tons of great neighborhoods, plenty of sports venues (obviously), good schools, and for the most part nice people, and as a "History" guy, I loved living in Boston - much like I loved living in D.C.

    For downsides, taxes suck, housing prices are pretty high, and I haven't been there since 2000 so I don't know how unbearable the sports "fans" there are in person these days, but I bet its still a nice place to live..
    Last edited by Jet_Engine1; 06-21-2011 at 12:59 PM.

  14. #14
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    19,076
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=pauliec;4050930]The last day was comprised of slightly more modern stops. First, to Cambridge, to visit perhaps the most famous university in the country. Harvard encapsulates the spirit of Boston in a relatively small college campus: old buildings and somewhat of a self-aggrandizing understanding of history.
    [/QUOTE]

    Hahvahd the spirit of Boston? Maybe to outsiders. The spirit of Boston is more like the dog track in Revere. Or, at most Bunker Hill Community College.

  15. #15
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bergen County, NJ
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=pauliec;4050930]


    Even the statue of John Harvard is on par with some of the great founding father memorials:

    [IMG]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2642/5853317794_40f74e547e_z.jpg[/IMG]

    [/QUOTE]

    From Wikipedia:

    A statue of John Harvard, sculpted by Daniel Chester French, sits in Harvard Yard at Harvard University. Despite its name, the statue does not depict the true likeness of John Harvard, as the sculptor had no accurate image to work from. The statue, known by Harvard tour guides as the statue of three lies, claims that it depicts John Harvard, Founder, 1638, but in reality Harvard was a contributor, not the founder; the institution was founded in 1636; and the statue is actually a likeness of someone else. French used a student as a model.

    _

  16. #16
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=JStokes;4050956]From Wikipedia:

    A statue of John Harvard, sculpted by Daniel Chester French, sits in Harvard Yard at Harvard University. Despite its name, the statue does not depict the true likeness of John Harvard, as the sculptor had no accurate image to work from. The statue, known by Harvard tour guides as the statue of three lies, claims that it depicts John Harvard, Founder, 1638, but in reality Harvard was a contributor, not the founder; the institution was founded in 1636; and the statue is actually a likeness of someone else. French used a student as a model.

    _[/QUOTE]

    Yes, I read about the "the statue of 3 lies." Thus my comment on its somewhat self-aggrandizing history.

  17. #17
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,920
    Post Thanks / Like
    Paulie..you're dead to me..

  18. #18
    JetsInsider.com Legend
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    49,999
    Post Thanks / Like
    Most grown-ups realize that every city has its plusses and minuses and the general population can't be defined by a few.

    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself Paulie.

  19. #19
    Waterboy
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=FF2;4050976]Most grown-ups realize that every city has its plusses and minuses and the general population can't be defined by a few.

    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself Paulie.[/QUOTE]

    :rolleyes:

  20. #20
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    19,076
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=FF2;4050976]Most grown-ups realize that every city has its plusses and minuses and the general population can't be defined by a few.

    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself Paulie.[/QUOTE]

    Every city? Even Buffalo?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us