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Thread: Woman arrested for filming police in NY; on her property

  1. #81
    [QUOTE=PatriotReign;4053097]Impunity huh? LOLz. Google Dawg please search 'cop sentenced to prison' and you'll find about 11 million story links. Your anti- everything police drivel is laughable as it is hyperbolic.

    You remind me of many people in crime ridden neighborhoods won't hesitate to pick up a phone or jump in front of/or film behind the nearest camera to watch/critique the police. Yet their sense of civic duty never seems to extend to watching and/or reporting the drug dealers and gang bangers who terrorize the neighborhood 24/7.[/QUOTE]

    No it's cool Ms. Good read an article the prior week about racial profiling and that is why she was recording it.
    Ms. Good saw all white police officers and knew she had to tape it. :rolleyes:

    [url]http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20110625/NEWS01/106250325/Activist-stunned-by-after-effects-of-event?odyssey=tab|mostpopular|text|NEWS[/url]

  2. #82
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    [QUOTE=cr726;4053158]Hysterical stuff, keep it coming, no really it's funny. :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    I thought it was. :D

  3. #83

    2 Videos in the link

    [QUOTE]Although the legal right to film on federal property now seems to be firmly established, many other questions about public photography still remain and place journalists and citizens in harm's way. Can you record a police encounter? Can you film on city or state property? What are a photographer's rights in so-called public spaces?

    These questions will remain unanswered until a case reaches the Supreme Court, says UCLA Law Professor Eugene Volokh, founder of the popular law blog The Volokh Conspiracy. Until then, it's up to people to know their rights and test the limits of free speech, even at the risk of harassment and arrest.

    Who will watch the watchers? All of us, it turns out, but only if we're willing to fight for our rights.[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://dailybail.com/home/death-of-america-why-i-was-arrested-at-a-public-commission-m.html[/url]

    DEATH OF AMERICA - 'Why I Was Arrested At A Public Commission Meeting In Washington D.C.' (SHOCK VIDEO)

  4. #84
    Bottom line, the Bill Of Rights is under attack here. Even the Police should be concerned about that

  5. #85
    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;4051844]She has been arrested before for interfering with the police plus she was told to backup and she didn't she was interfering with the police.[/QUOTE]

    Sorry, but that was out and out ridiculous. Fairly obviously unconstitutional

  6. #86
    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4051880]LMAO, you think cops shouldn't be afraid because they have guns? That's as immature an attitude towards firearms that I've ever heard. And how do they know she had no weapons, because she said so? Even if she's standing there nekkid(!), she could still run up behind one of them and attack them. Since they have guns though, I suppose they could just cap her ass if she did that, right?:rolleyes:
    [B]
    The cop acted appropriately with a belligerent bystander. [/B] There is no "overly-sensitive" when you feel your safety may be at stake, with or without threatening comments.[/QUOTE]

    Bull. The "belligerent bystander" said and did nothing threatening. She was standing on her own property, videotaping. Police had no authority to direct her to move, and no legal basis to arrest her.

  7. #87
    [QUOTE=doggin94it;4053321]Bull. The "belligerent bystander" said and did nothing threatening. She was standing on her own property, videotaping. Police had no authority to direct her to move, and no legal basis to arrest her.[/QUOTE]

    I wouldn't of arrested her, but if you listened to what she said she stated she was on the sidewalk when her encounter with the police began.

  8. #88

    Police using every means possible to stop filming!!!

    Wow, the police are even using SEAGULLS to take your cameras away!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    [url]http://www.break.com/index/seagull-steals-video-camera-while-its-recording-2075893[/url]

  9. #89
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    [url]http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20110628/NEWS01/106280326[/url]

    All charges were dropped against Emily Good. She says she plans to sue the city (and I hope she sues the cop individually, also) It's unfortunate that the city is going to have to spend money and resources now, especially in such a fiscally trying time. Perhaps it would have been wiser to instruct their police officers on the civil rights of citizens, rather than let them trample people's rights and have to pay for it later.

  10. #90

    It's Pandemic......

    City Of Denver Went Over $1 Million In Police Brutality Settlements Monday Night


    Last night, Denver's police force settlements spilled over $1 million in payouts from the city this year alone.

    Denver's city council voted unanimously on Monday to settle two excessive force lawsuits for $80,000.

    In 2008, Brighton volunteer firefighter Jared Lunn was heckled and then punched by another man while carrying a pizza to his car. When he spotted Officer Eric Sellers, he asked the officer for help but Sellers allegedly refused. When Lunn made a sarcastic comment, Sellers placed him in a chokehold on the ground, handcuffed him and reportedly wouldn't let him leave until he'd apologized. After a 40-day suspension, Sellers resigned and the Denver City Council settled his case for $45,000.

    Two years later in a separate case, Denver Police were caught on videotape in the shocking beating of Mark Ashford. Ashford had been walking his dogs when he saw police pull someone over for running a stop sign, and he offered to testify that the driver had stopped. Officers John Diaz and Jeff Cook then came over, when they detained and beat him.

    "They punched him and pinned him up against the fence and forced his head into the concrete," Ashford's attorney, Will Hart said.

    The Denver Post reports that Diaz retired before the case reached its conclusion and Cook did not face punishment for excessive force. Ashford reportedly settled for $35,000.

    Videos are available below depicting incidents of Denver Police brutality that have either produced firings within the department or been settled this year.

    WATCH:

    [url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/14/city-of-denver-police-brutality_n_877082.html#s291979&title=Marvin_Booker_[/url]

  11. #91
    [QUOTE=cr726;4053372]I wouldn't of arrested her, but if you listened to what she said she stated she was on the sidewalk when her encounter with the police began.[/QUOTE]

    And, therefore? Public property, she's allowed to videotape. And she was backing up when asked - just refused to go inside, as was her right.

  12. #92
    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg;4054241]City Of Denver Went Over $1 Million In Police Brutality Settlements Monday Night


    Last night, Denver's police force settlements spilled over $1 million in payouts from the city this year alone.

    Denver's city council voted unanimously on Monday to settle two excessive force lawsuits for $80,000.

    In 2008, Brighton volunteer firefighter Jared Lunn was heckled and then punched by another man while carrying a pizza to his car. When he spotted Officer Eric Sellers, he asked the officer for help but Sellers allegedly refused. When Lunn made a sarcastic comment, Sellers placed him in a chokehold on the ground, handcuffed him and reportedly wouldn't let him leave until he'd apologized. After a 40-day suspension, Sellers resigned and the Denver City Council settled his case for $45,000.

    Two years later in a separate case, [B]Denver Police were caught on videotape in the shocking beating of Mark Ashford.[/B] Ashford had been walking his dogs when he saw police pull someone over for running a stop sign, and he offered to testify that the driver had stopped. Officers John Diaz and Jeff Cook then came over, when they detained and beat him.
    [B]
    "They punched him and pinned him up against the fence and forced his head into the concrete," Ashford's attorney, Will Hart said.

    The Denver Post reports that Diaz retired before the case reached its conclusion and Cook did not face punishment for excessive force. Ashford reportedly settled for $35,000.[/B]

    Videos are available below depicting incidents of Denver Police brutality that have either produced firings within the department or been settled this year.

    WATCH:

    [URL]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/14/city-of-denver-police-brutality_n_877082.html#s291979&title=Marvin_Booker_[/URL][/QUOTE]

    There is no way in the world that a videotaped police beatdown settled for $35,000. That's a nuisance value settlement.

  13. #93
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    [QUOTE=doggin94it;4054265]And, therefore? Public property, she's allowed to videotape. And she was backing up when asked - just refused to go inside, as was her right.[/QUOTE]


    Doggin, you don't think she was trying get arrested? It seems obvious she was busting the cops balls, even if she was within her rights. Dosen't mak ethe cops right, I guess, but I don't have much sympathy for her.

  14. #94
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    Meanwhile...

    One man managed to completely shutdown Times Square for hours, buy climbing a pole, causing enormous congestion and taxing the City's resources. Police were reticent to act in any overt manner to get him down. Wonder why?:rolleyes:

    [quote=NY Post]It's nice to know that New York's Finest are quick to respond to any potential threat in a congested area like Times Square.

    But there's such a thing as overreacting -- especially when it's clear that no one's life is in danger.

    That's just what happened yesterday morning for two hours as a self-promoting aspiring rapper shut down traffic in the heart of Midtown as far north as 57th Street while he sat perched atop a traffic signal.

    Yes -- two hours.

    The man, who has a long history of disrupting live TV broadcasts, had been ejected from the MTV studios. So he climbed atop a 20-foot traffic-light pole at 44th Street and Seventh Avenue and refused to get down.

    He rapped. He threw CDs to the quickly gathering crowd. He did pull-ups on the beam.

    And what did cops do?

    They called an ESU truck. They set up an inflatable pad on the sidewalk in case he decided to jump. They begged and pleaded for him to come on down.

    And they turned the Crossroads of the World into a giant parking lot.

    For two whole hours.

    Finally, the man -- who raps under the name of Coney Island Joe -- deigned to end his "performance" and was taken into custody, charged with reckless endangerment, obstructing governmental administration, disorderly conduct and trespassing.

    We expect Manhattan DA Cy Vance to press these charges with some vigor. And we expect whatever judge he faces to impose punishment that appropriately reflects the massive disruption that the moron caused.

    As for the NYPD, here's a suggestion:

    Next time Coney Island Joe, or anyone, pulls a stunt like this, leave the inflatable pads on the truck, and the negotiators back at the precinct.

    Just call the Fire Department -- and let them hose the dope off the pole.

    That'll end things nice and quick.[/quote]

    Read more: [url]http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/the_finest_not_so_finest_hour_SvodtsW4DJuo3SnGPUfORM#ixzz1QfVMyosL[/url]

    Now, I'm not condoning doing as the Post suggests and using a hose on the guy, but at some point the police need to do what needs to be done that best serves the greater public good. No easy answers, I guess.

  15. #95
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    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4054787]One man managed to completely shutdown Times Square for hours, buy climbing a pole, causing enormous congestion and taxing the City's resources. Police were reticent to act in any overt manner to get him down. Wonder why?:rolleyes:



    Read more: [URL]http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/the_finest_not_so_finest_hour_SvodtsW4DJuo3SnGPUfORM#ixzz1QfVMyosL[/URL]

    Now, I'm not condoning doing as the Post suggests and using a hose on the guy, but at some point the police need to do what needs to be done that best serves the greater public good. No easy answers, I guess.[/QUOTE]

    Should have treated him like a bear in a tree in a neighborhood and shot him with a tranquilizer dart but I guess a taser could do the trick as well.

  16. #96
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    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4054787]One man managed to completely shutdown Times Square for hours, buy climbing a pole, causing enormous congestion and taxing the City's resources. Police were reticent to act in any overt manner to get him down. Wonder why?:rolleyes:



    Read more: [url]http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/the_finest_not_so_finest_hour_SvodtsW4DJuo3SnGPUfORM#ixzz1QfVMyosL[/url]

    Now, I'm not condoning doing as the Post suggests and using a hose on the guy, but at some point the police need to do what needs to be done that best serves the greater public good. No easy answers, I guess.[/QUOTE]

    Was that light pole on that guy's own private property?

  17. #97
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    [QUOTE=Trades;4054799]Should have treated him like a bear in a tree in a neighborhood and shot him with a tranquilizer dart but I guess a taser could do the trick as well.[/QUOTE]

    Problem is, they did that to someone else (mentally ill) a couple of years back, from a shorter height, and the guy died from faceplanting the ground. The boss that gave the order to taser wound up committing suicide. Sad situation all around.:(

    [QUOTE=freestater;4054896]Was that light pole on that guy's own private property?[/QUOTE]

    It was obviously not as the incident occurred in Times Square. Do you have anything meaningful to add or are you content to just make facetious comments?

    The point was the police showed great (perhaps too much) restraint and in turn allowed one jerkoff to inconvenience and jeopardize the rest of the public. The problem, as it relates to all the OP's threads, is how should it have been addressed so as to not "trample on civil rights" or be second-guessed for tactics employed in good faith that may result in an unfavorable outcome, like in the case I referenced above?

    Again, no easy answers for the most part, IMO.

  18. #98
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    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4054971]Problem is, they did that to someone else (mentally ill) a couple of years back, from a shorter height, and the guy died from faceplanting the ground. The boss that gave the order to taser wound up committing suicide. Sad situation all around.:([/QUOTE]

    Well that's why you have to set up the big blow up cushion first.

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