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Thread: Financial Scandal..Big Deal?

  1. #1
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    Financial Scandal..Big Deal?

    so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?

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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story?

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    Absolutely. I would.



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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]


    Just be yourself, sir. No matter what happens, they can't take that away from you.

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    I would probably suggest wearing a suit for your phone interview.

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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    I would suggest dimming the lights and putting on some Allman Brothers.

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    i guess after writing that much, even being about college bb, id say im definitely interested in this story/scandal. i guess i was really asking for thoughts/comments about the story

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    Are you on drugs?

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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064709]i guess after writing that much, even being about college bb, id say im definitely interested in this story/scandal. i guess i was really asking for thoughts/comments about the story[/QUOTE]

    Its got legs.




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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    All the effort you are making will ultimately pay off.

    Dedicate yourself with a calm mind to the task at hand.

    Don’t let your limitations overshadow your talents.

    If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right.

    The value lies not within any particular thing, but in the desire placed on that thing.

  10. #10
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    ST Harvest is the best fall beer. Just a couple of months away. Be patient.

    [img]http://www.ratebeer.com/beerimages/27471.jpg[/img]

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064709]i guess after writing that much, even being about college bb, id say im definitely interested in this story/scandal. i guess i was really asking for thoughts/comments about the story[/QUOTE]

    you are a bright guy - you don't belong in the hampur. this place is a quasi retard colony.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    [B][U]Lemon Meringue Pie[/U][/B]

    [I][U]For shell[/U][/I]
    1 recipe Pastry Dough for a single-crust 9- to 10-inch pie
    raw rice or pie weights for weighting shell

    [I][U]For filling[/U][/I]
    1 cup sugar
    5 tablespoons cornstarch
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 cup water
    1/2 cup milk
    4 large egg yolks
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
    2 teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest

    [I][U]For meringue[/U][/I]
    4 large egg whites
    1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1/2 cup sugar

    [B][I]Make shell:[/I][/B]
    On a lightly floured surface with a floured rolling pin roll out dough into a 13-inch round, (about 1/8 inch thick) and fit into a 9-inch (1-quart) pie plate. Trim edge of dough, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang, and crimp edge decoratively. Prick shell in several places with a fork and chill, covered, 30 minutes.
    Preheat oven to [COLOR="Red"]400°F[/COLOR].
    Line shell with wax paper and fill with rice or pie weights. Bake shell in middle of oven [COLOR="blue"]10 minutes[/COLOR]. Remove paper and rice carefully and bake shell until golden, about [COLOR="blue"]12 minutes[/COLOR] more. Cool shell in pie plate on a rack.
    Lower oven temperature to [COLOR="red"]350°F[/COLOR].

    [B][I]Make filling:[/I][/B]
    In a heavy saucepan whisk together sugar, cornstarch, and salt and gradually whisk in water and milk, whisking until cornstarch is dissolved. In a bowl whisk together egg yolks. Cook milk mixture over moderate heat, whisking, until it comes to a boil. Gradually whisk about 1 cup milk mixture into yolks and whisk yolk mixture into milk mixture. Simmer mixture, whisking, [COLOR="blue"]3 minutes.[/COLOR] Remove pan from heat and whisk in butter, lemon juice, and zest until butter is melted. Cover surface of filling with plastic wrap.

    [B][I]Make meringue:[/I][/B]
    In another bowl with an electric mixer beat egg whites with cream of tartar and a pinch of salt until they hold soft peaks. Beat in sugar in a slow stream, beating until meringue just holds stiff peaks.
    Pour filling into shell and spread meringue on top, covering filling completely, sealing it to pastry. Draw meringue up into peaks and bake pie in middle of oven until meringue is golden, about [COLOR="Blue"]15 minutes[/COLOR].

  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=ryanmcg86;4064263]so, according to [URL="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/basketball/ncaa/07/19/coaches.investment/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_t12_a1"]si.com[/URL], there is this emerging financial scandal involving a ponzi scheme run by a guy that was a 'houston businessman and AAU basketball operator', i imagine a buddy garrity type of guy when i picture this character. anyway, according to this story, this guy ran a ponzi scheme with the investments he got from a bunch of big name people in the college basketball world, who he knew through working with the AAU and therefore holding these college coaches interests because of the potential prospects his organization helped cultivate that could in turn be signed and used in these coaches college basketball programs. due to this, these coaches were investing in this businessmans firm, with the understanding that by doing so, they'd have exclusive rights to the best players coming out of the AAU and going into college. now, not only is this scandalous in terms of the NCAA because of the conflict of interest for the investors (who are NCAA sanctioned basketball coaches), but it is scandalous to the financial world as well due to what this 'businessman' was doing with these investments. it turned out that not only was he being unethical and committing NCAA crimes, but he was committing an illegal crime as well. He was running a ponzi scheme with the investments that he had to coerce out of these coaches with the favor of his athletic prospects.

    not only were the investments received correctly (in NCAA terms) but they were not invested correctly (legal terms). this is two major scandals rolled into one. but the thing is, i hate college basketball, march madness is the worst month of the year for me. suddenly for 1 month a year everyone is a college basketball expert, and the other 11 months no one i know breathes a word of college basketball? no, don't think so, screw you college basketball, im not gonna like you at all. so, other than that this scandal is embedded in the least interesting sport there is to me, this scandal has everything you want in a scandal. it is a major infraction, in both instances, involving famous people, millions of dollars, and someone scamming everyone all along. then, like a tragic movie, at the end, right as the police finally have it solved and they are about to arrest him, he goes and kills himself. what. you can't write this stuff. seriously, go write a movie script with this story. you'll be a millionaire yourself in 2 years time. the man killed himself, by shooting himself in the head. unreal. who actually does this in real life. you see it in movies like american beauty and **** like that. and maybe you know that kid that was a depressed teen who offed himself with too many pills or OD'ing on E or something and thats the biggest suicide you can ever remember and you weren't particularly close to the kid. or maybe you didn't know him, it was just in the newspaper or something. whatever, you knew about it, thats all thats important.

    the point is, when someone asks you how often this type of thing happens, even with regular people, its like, MAX 1 or 2 times a year? if that even? like, people don't violently kill themselves, it really doesn't happen. so that someone that is a millionaire should violently kill themselves, who happens to be involved in not 1 but 2 major scandals (of course we know that getting caught for these 2 scandals is probably WHY he killed himself, but that only takes away from the acknowledgement of severity enough that i had to mention it, but still doesn't actually matter) is just such a huge story that it has to be fascinating to a large audience of people, right?

    but its just my distaste for college basketball. it just makes it so hard for me to care. like, when reading that article it mentions a lot of the coaches names. and, i guess in some circles, if you know all like, 120 different head coaches in 1A, then reading all these names is a big deal. but this isn't like, baseball mangers here, where you know everyone, most of these guys, despite being millionaires, are people you wouldn't recognize if you saw them walking down the street.

    so its like, the details i would end up caring about in a scandal like this, is what happens to who because of the fallout. but because i don't know any of the people involved since its involved with a sport i find boring and pretentious b/c of how the fans pretend to know it all for march madness, i find that part boring, which of course takes away from my enjoyment of the unfolding of the scandal. which i suppose is selfish of me, but i mean, if there going to report stories like this in the format that they do, when they sell these stories as entertainment, i'm going to treat it like any other piece of entertainment i'm fed (by tv, internet or any other medium), by critiquing it and trying to figure out how it could have more entertaining, whether its fiction or reality.

    so what it comes down to is this, despite it taking place in a sport i do not at all care about, should i still try and care about this basketball scandal just because of HOW HUGE a deal they are going to make this story, and it'd be dumb to miss out on it? or should i stick to my convictions, proclaim that college basketball is boring so i avoid all stories involving college basketball, no matter how big, and then prove my honesty and ability to keep a promise by ignoring a story this big. care about the story? or don't care about the story.

    thoughts?[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MRmxfLuNto&feature=player_embedded[/url]

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