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Thread: The Transformation of Michele Bachmann

  1. #1
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    The Transformation of Michele Bachmann

    [URL="http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/15/110815fa_fact_lizza?currentPage=all"]www.newyorker.com[/URL]


    Interesting article

    I posted some highlights



    [QUOTE]
    Bachmann belongs to a generation of Christian conservatives whose views have been shaped by institutions, tracts, and leaders not commonly known to secular Americans, or even to most Christians. Her campaign is going to be a conversation about a set of beliefs more extreme than those of any American politician of her stature, including Sarah Palin, to whom she is inevitably compared. Bachmann said in 2004 that being gay is “personal enslavement,” and that, if same-sex marriage were legalized, “little children will be forced to learn that homosexuality is normal and natural and that perhaps they should try it.” Speaking about gay-rights activists, that same year, she said, “It is our children that is the prize for this community.” She believes that evolution is a theory that has “never been proven,” and that intelligent design should be taught in schools
    [/QUOTE]



    [QUOTE]

    In total, the Bachmanns took in twenty-three girls; I spoke with one of them (she did not want her name used), who stayed with the Bachmanns for three and a half years and now lives in Colorado. She said, “I owe the Bachmanns everything. They offered me the structure I needed and taught me how to figure out goals. They really encouraged me to figure out who I was rather than who I was becoming. I turned my life around one hundred and eighty degrees.”[/QUOTE]



    [QUOTE]
    In 1993, she and six others founded the New Heights charter school, in Stillwater. The school was designed for at-risk kids, and the charter agreement, signed by all seven co-founders, mandated that the publicly funded school “is and will be non-sectarian in all programs, admission policies, employment practices and all other operations.”
    …[/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE]
    Soon after the school year started, parents began to notice that New Heights had a strong Christian orientation. At an October meeting, a board member asked whether a document called “20 Key Principles of Christian Management” was officially part of the school’s “documentation,” as Meyer had claimed in a memo to the board. Denise Stephens, a parent of a student at the school, told G. R. Anderson, Jr., a reporter for the Minneapolis City Pages, that creationism was being advocated and that students were not allowed to watch the movie “Aladdin,” because it involved magic and paganism. The school district warned New Heights that it risked losing its charter. “I told Mr. Meyer and Ms. Bachmann some of my concerns and indicated that I was not going to be able to support something that seemed to be headed in a direction contrary to the state law,” David Wettergren, Stillwater’s superintendent of schools at the time, told me. About six months after the school was founded, Bachmann and Meyer resigned from the leadership. With the two of them gone, the school purged the curriculum of its religious orientation. “The school pulled itself together, so we continued to charter it,” Wettergren said.
    Bachmann often describes her and Marcus’s work at New Heights as a major accomplishment. “We felt a challenge; we started a charter school,” she said in a speech in West Des Moines earlier this year. “It is still going on today. We got together with about five other couples. We started this charter school for at-risk kids. And it’s a very special niche, and we’re proud of the fact that that school has been started and it’s ongoing.”
    [/QUOTE]


    [QUOTE]
    For many years, Bachmann has said that she showed up at the convention on a whim and nominated herself at the urging of some friends. She was, she suggests, an accidental candidate. This version of history has become central to her political biography and is repeated in most profiles of her. A 2009 column by George F. Will, for example, says that “on the spur of the moment” some Bachmann allies suggested nominating her.
    But she already had a long history of political activism—the Carter and Reagan campaigns, her anti-abortion and education activism, her school-board race—and she had been targeting Laidig for a year. According to an article in the Stillwater Gazette, on October 6, 1999, Bachmann was talking about running against Laidig months before she went to the convention. “I tried to present information to Senator Laidig on Profile of Learning, he was not interested,” she said. “And I told him that if he’s not willing to be more responsive to the citizens, that I may have to run for his seat.” She told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that she had decided to run against Laidig a year earlier.

    [/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE]
    But, on the plane’s television, Sean Hannity, of Fox News, was discussing the latest Bachmann controversy: an interview with George Stephanopoulos, in which she defended an earlier statement that the Founders worked tirelessly to end slavery. Even though Hannity reliably supported Bachmann, David Polyansky, the deputy campaign manager, groaned. “I wish he wouldn’t replay it,” he said. O’Donnell, the speech coach, nodded. The campaign veterans did not see the benefits of their candidate chatting about American slavery. But Bachmann was still not convinced that she was wrong. Someone had sent her research to back up her claim. “Did you get that e-mail saying that there’s more of them that we can talk about?” she asked, from the front of the plane. Polyansky and O’Donnell glanced at each other, but neither of them responded.

    Bachmann’s comment about slavery was not a gaffe. It is, as she would say, a world view. In “Christianity and the Constitution,” the book she worked on with Eidsmoe, her law-school mentor, he argues that John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams “expressed their abhorrence for the institution” and explains that “many Christians opposed slavery even though they owned slaves.” They didn’t free their slaves, he writes, because of their benevolence. “It might be very difficult for a freed slave to make a living in that economy; under such circumstances setting slaves free was both inhumane and irresponsible.”

    While looking over Bachmann’s State Senate campaign Web site, I stumbled upon a list of book recommendations. The third book on the list, which appeared just before the Declaration of Independence and George Washington’s Farewell Address, is a 1997 biography of Robert E. Lee by J. Steven Wilkins.

    Wilkins is the leading proponent of the theory that the South was an orthodox Christian nation unjustly attacked by the godless North. This revisionist take on the Civil War, known as the “theological war” thesis, had little resonance outside a small group of Southern historians until the mid-twentieth century, when Rushdoony and others began to popularize it in evangelical circles. In the book, Wilkins condemns “the radical abolitionists of New England” and writes that “most southerners strove to treat their slaves with respect and provide them with a sufficiency of goods for a comfortable, though—by modern standards—spare existence.”

    African slaves brought to America, he argues, were essentially lucky: “Africa, like any other pagan country, was permeated by the cruelty and barbarism typical of unbelieving cultures.” Echoing Eidsmoe, Wilkins also approvingly cites Lee’s insistence that abolition could not come until “the sanctifying effects of Christianity” had time “to work in the black race and fit its people for freedom.”

    In his chapter on race relations in the antebellum South, Wilkins writes:


    [QUOTE]
    Slavery, as it operated in the pervasively Christian society which was the old South, was not an adversarial relationship founded upon racial animosity. In fact, it bred on the whole, not contempt, but, over time, mutual respect. This produced a mutual esteem of the sort that always results when men give themselves to a common cause. The credit for this startling reality must go to the Christian faith. . . . The unity and companionship that existed between the races in the South prior to the war was the fruit of a common faith.
    [/QUOTE]


    For several years, the book, which Bachmann’s campaign declined to discuss with me, was listed on her Web site, under the heading “Michele’s Must Read List.”[/QUOTE]

  2. #2
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    She's not even going to win the nomination, don't even sweat it.

  3. #3
    Sweat it. She is campaigning like a m'fer and getting results.

    Predictably the left will try to marginalize her with the same brutal tactics that effectively worked on Palin, possibly because the left can't tell the difference between Bachmann and Palin.

    I think we're all beginning to realize that Bachmann is a great deal more of a politician than Palin. For her message alone, she's spot on what this country needs.

    As per the "crazy" nonsense (a charge that's not actually rooted in anything but her not filling the optimal GOP candidate profile for a Democrat to run against), if the body politic wants to examine crazy all we have to do is think about how we shooed Obama into the White House with a red carpet and near zero due diligence. And the price that liberals will pay for that bout of 2008 craziness is the GOP back into the White House.

    (NEWSFLASH: Obama's approval rating dipping below 40%)

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    As an agnostic libertarian, I'm always depressed when I hear people I so agree with on fiscal issues reveal themselves to be Jesus superfans.

    That being said, this has been Bachman's week. She has shown herself to be no Sarah Palin. Anyone who puts her in that fraud's category would be making a big mistake.

  5. #5
    Unfortunately for her, she wears her faith to openly. She will be attacked time and time again. You don't need to broadcast your religion your deeds show them for you!

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    If a far right evangelist wins the nomination, it's going to be Perry not Bachmann.

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=sackdance;4103188]Sweat it. She is campaigning like a m'fer and getting results.

    Predictably the left will try to marginalize her with the same brutal tactics that effectively worked on Palin, possibly because the left can't tell the difference between Bachmann and Palin.

    I think we're all beginning to realize that Bachmann is a great deal more of a politician than Palin. For her message alone, she's spot on what this country needs.

    As per the "crazy" nonsense (a charge that's not actually rooted in anything but her not filling the optimal GOP candidate profile for a Democrat to run against), if the body politic wants to examine crazy all we have to do is think about how we shooed Obama into the White House with a red carpet and near zero due diligence. And the price that liberals will pay for that bout of 2008 craziness is the GOP back into the White House.

    (NEWSFLASH: [B]Obama's approval rating dipping below 40%[/B])[/QUOTE]

    Bachmann would kill for that approval rating. :yes:

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    [QUOTE=parafly;4103239]If a far right evangelist wins the nomination, it's going to be Perry not Bachmann.[/QUOTE]

    I agree. I also don't think he can win the general election, so if you're for Obama, this is probably the scenerio you are rooting for (at least right this minute).

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    [QUOTE=Traitor Jay & the Woodies;4103363]I agree. I also don't think he can win the general election, so if you're for Obama, this is probably the scenerio you are rooting for (at least right this minute).[/QUOTE]

    Why don't you think Perry could win?

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=Trades;4103376]Why don't you think Perry could win?[/QUOTE]

    I think Perry can win. He can win on his record as governor which is superior. While Obama has been losing jobs, Perry has created lots.
    He stands for something and is a MUCH better speaker than Obama and has enthusiasm. And is patriotic.
    Frankly, Bachmann is a better speaker than Obama also. Both are also able to answer questions without stumbling and stammering (an Obama trait). I think Bachamnn, as just a representitive, has a tougher road. No rep has been elected since 1880.

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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;4103229]Unfortunately for her, she wears her faith to openly. She will be attacked time and time again. You don't need to broadcast your religion your deeds show them for you![/QUOTE]

    I agree.

    No reason to hide it, but no reason to beat people to death with it.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=palmetto defender;4103436][B]I think Perry can win. He can win on his record as governor which is superior.[/B] While Obama has been losing jobs, Perry has created lots.
    He stands for something and is a MUCH better speaker than Obama and has enthusiasm. And is patriotic.
    Frankly, Bachmann is a better speaker than Obama also. Both are also able to answer questions without stumbling and stammering (an Obama trait). I think Bachamnn, as just a representitive, has a tougher road. No rep has been elected since 1880.[/QUOTE]


    I think we all need to read some analysis on Governor Perry's time in office. I have heard criticism of Governor Perry term in office from both the Obama campaign and from Ron Paul but no specifics.

    As for Bachmann being a better speaker than President Obama you should read the article that started this thread. In speeches she has totally misrepresented her family history for political gain in Iowa and she stated that the founding fathers of the USA ended slavery. Ooops!


    [QUOTE]

    In the speech, Bachmann said that her family arrived in the state in the eighteen-fifties and experienced a series of misfortunes: “the worst winter in fifty years,” “the worst flooding in forty-two years,” “the worst drought that anyone had ever recorded,” and then a plague of “locusts.” But they persevered, and even started the first Lutheran church in the area. The family came to Iowa, she said, after reading the Muskego Manifesto, a letter sent from Norwegian settlers in the town of Muskego to their families back home. Bachmann quoted the manifesto, which describes an America where people “have civil and religious liberty, and here we can choose whatever profession we want, and no one tells us what profession we go in.” Her ancestors, she said, read those words and “sold everything and took their five children and bought boat tickets to come to Iowa.”

    In fact, Muskego is a town in Wisconsin, the state where Bachmann’s forebears, the Munsons, settled in 1857, twelve years after the manifesto was written. Then, in 1861, they moved west, to the Dakota Territory, near present-day Elk Point, South Dakota. That is where, according to the family history that Bachmann relied on, they encountered the awful winter and the flooding and the drought and what the text calls “grasshoppers.” The Munsons seem to have been part of the group that established the first Lutheran church in the Dakota Territory, but there were already Lutheran congregations in Iowa when they arrived there, in late 1864 or early 1865. As the author and historian Chris Rodda has pointed out, the story chronicled is not quite one of superhuman perseverance on the frontier; rather, it’s the story of a family fleeing to the relative safety and civilization of settled Iowa. In other words, Bachmann’s dramatic tale happened near Iowa, but not actually in it.

    [/QUOTE]

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=palmetto defender;4103436]I think Perry can win. He can win on his record as governor which is superior. While Obama has been losing jobs, Perry has created lots. [/QUOTE]

    Rick Perry got lucky. Nothing he did as governor helped his state as much as the rising price of gas and oil... and the technology boom of Fracking. it's easy to add jobs when that happens. they call it the Texas Miracle for a reason

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    [QUOTE=Trades;4103376]Why don't you think Perry could win?[/QUOTE]

    Because it is not going to be very difficult for Team Obama to turn him into Dubya 2.0. And when that happens, Obama will destroy Perry in the general election.

    The Republicans best hope is sitting in Trenton right now. He is the only GOP guy/gal I see winning this election in 2012. Romney [I]could [/I]win, but Christie [I]would [/I]win, imo.

  15. #15
    [QUOTE=Traitor Jay & the Woodies;4104036]
    The Republicans best hope is sitting in Trenton right now. He is the only GOP guy/gal I see winning this election in 2012. [/QUOTE]

    considering Christie's recent asthma flare-up it's probably not the best time to start a national campaign. 2016 might be his year.

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=Traitor Jay & the Woodies;4104036]Because it is not going to be very difficult for Team Obama to turn him into Dubya 2.0. And when that happens, Obama will destroy Perry in the general election.

    The Republicans best hope is sitting in Trenton right now. He is the only GOP guy/gal I see winning this election in 2012. Romney [I]could [/I]win, but Christie [I]would [/I]win, imo.[/QUOTE]

    Honestly, it shouldn't be very difficult for the Republican nominee to turn Obama into Dubya 2.0.

    I think some people are undervaluing Perry in this situation. He has the look and moxy of an effective President, and many independents are frustrated with Obama's lack of leadership.

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=bitonti;4104038]considering Christie's recent asthma flare-up it's probably not the best time to start a national campaign. 2016 might be his year.[/QUOTE]

    If he lives that long.

    [QUOTE=parafly;4104040]Honestly, it shouldn't be very difficult for the Republican nominee to turn Obama into Dubya 2.0.

    I think some people are undervaluing Perry in this situation. He has the look and moxy of an effective President, and many independents are frustrated with Obama's lack of leadership.[/QUOTE]

    He might I guess, but I'm a guy counting the days until Obama is out of office and when I saw Perry in that prayer event this weekend, it just gave me the creeps. The Rebublicans let the religious right hijack the party for 20 years -- and just as I thought they realized what a mistake that was -- people like Perry and Bachman shoot to the forefront, outflanking secular conservatives to stand with the tea party.

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Traitor Jay & the Woodies;4104044]He might I guess, but I'm a guy counting the days until Obama is out of office and when I saw Perry in that prayer event this weekend, it just gave me the creeps. The Rebublicans let the religious right hijack the party for 20 years -- and just as I thought they realized what a mistake that was -- people like Perry and Bachman shoot to the forefront, outflanking secular conservatives to stand with the tea party.[/QUOTE]

    I hear you. Secular conservatives and moderates have not been well represented in quite some time. Personally, I find it very difficult (basically impossible) to pull the lever for an anti-gay, anti-science Republican even if we share some of the same fiscal views.

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=bitonti;4104007]Rick Perry got lucky. Nothing he did as governor helped his state as much as the rising price of gas and oil... and the technology boom of Fracking. it's easy to add jobs when that happens. they call it the Texas Miracle for a reason[/QUOTE]

    A state with no state tax basically out foxed the entire country for the last decade...

    You call it luck because a Pub was in charge... You'd be s*cking off whoever it was if this happened under (D)...

    Thems the facts...

  20. #20
    [QUOTE=AlwaysGreenAlwaysWhite;4104077]A state with no state tax basically out foxed the entire country for the last decade...

    You call it luck because a Pub was in charge... You'd be s*cking off whoever it was if this happened under (D)...

    Thems the facts...[/QUOTE]

    Texas wasn't hit very hard by the homeowner thing because ----------wait for it -------------------- REGULATIONS.................................................

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