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Thread: The Scotch/Whiskey/Bourbon thread (Expanded)

  1. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snell41 View Post
    I would just like to say that I have been following this thread for about a year now. I was never much of a scotch drinker, however someone treated me to a glass of Johnny Walker Blue. Totally blew my mind, and thus exposed me to a whole new world. I am currently enjoying a bottole of Glenmorangie Quinto Ruban. I also have a bottle of Maccallan 15 y/o as well. I swear I go through this thrad just to drool over all the bottles.


    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    Enlighten me, please.

  2. #282
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    Stay a bit lower if you want and go for Glenmorangie Signet or Dalmore 18, ~$200. Those are next for me and I've never heard a bad word about either.
    Mrs Werblin bought me a bottle of the Signet for a New Year present (we agreed no christmas presents this year... she found a loophole). Anyway, it is sublime. Brought it to my friend's house, he prepared 2 filets, and we drank scotch, ate steak, and smoked cigars watching the playoffs. It was a great day. I can not express in words how good the Signet is, but I must say they could probably trim at least $25 off the price sans the fancy bottle and packaging.

  3. #283
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    Enlighten me, please.
    Bunnahabhain 12yo (46.3%, OB, 2010)

    The new presentation for the Islay distillery and wisely now bottled at 46.3% and “un-chillfiltered” and with the ‘natural colour (no spirit caramel added). The higher bottling strength and the lack of chill filtration are significant move in the right direction and demonstrated that they have been listening to their customers. This is worth saying 3 times…

    The nose is honeyed with rich warmed apricots, fruit cake and some Oxo cubes in the back ground. There are some good wood spice in the form of a little hessian and cinnamon, it’s quite fragrant. The heaviness of the Oxo cubes and the warmed fruit are a little more assertive and with time the Oxo cubes win. It’s a significantly richer aroma and some what not very typical of Islay whiskies (no peat). The taste is warming, rich and assertive with lots of wood notes in the form of bees wax, bitter cold tea, the hessian and cinnamon. There is also some fragrant heather and chocolate notes. Significantly there is a lack of peat (which does not detract) and the honey notes on the nose are over taken by the wood notes. It’s very nice and quite dry. The finish is long warming and quite dry with all the afore mentioned notes present but the wood notes are quite evident and once again it all works; it’s a great finish.

    A change from previous bottlings, the lack of chill filtration, higher bottling strength of 46.3% plus the lack of caramel to dull the taste has produced a very vibrant example.



    http://www.bunnahabhain.com/
    Last edited by Warfish; 01-06-2014 at 07:01 PM.

  4. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by SONNY WERBLIN View Post
    Mrs Werblin bought me a bottle of the Signet for a New Year present (we agreed no christmas presents this year... she found a loophole). Anyway, it is sublime. Brought it to my friend's house, he prepared 2 filets, and we drank scotch, ate steak, and smoked cigars watching the playoffs. It was a great day. I can not express in words how good the Signet is, but I must say they could probably trim at least $25 off the price sans the fancy bottle and packaging.
    Truth. The heft on the cap alone is crazy and the bottle is almost display-worthy, but that's been the trend since being acquired by LVMH, very image conscious. Thankfully, the product hasn't suffered for it.

    BTW, I love it when the wife finds a loophole like that, although if you aren't prepared for that tactic you can feel a bit cadish. I've caught on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warfish View Post
    Bunnahabhain 12yo...It’s a significantly richer aroma and some what not very typical of Islay whiskies (no peat). The taste is warming, rich and assertive with lots of wood notes in the form of bees wax, bitter cold tea, the hessian and cinnamon. There is also some fragrant heather and chocolate notes. Significantly there is a lack of peat (which does not detract) and the honey notes on the nose are over taken by the wood notes. It’s very nice and quite dry.
    Annnnnd, sold! I'm adding it to the list, thanks!

  5. #285
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    Truth. The heft on the cap alone is crazy and the bottle is almost display-worthy, but that's been the trend since being acquired by LVMH, very image conscious. Thankfully, the product hasn't suffered for it.

    BTW, I love it when the wife finds a loophole like that, although if you aren't prepared for that tactic you can feel a bit cadish. I've caught on.
    ...
    I was annoyed that the heavy metal(?) collar on the top of the bottle, which adds thickness to the bottle opening, was causing me to spill a precious drop or two on each pour.

    The Mrs is no dummy. She convinces me that we should save money by not buying Christmas gifts for each other than she buys me a $170 bottle of scotch as a "New Year" gift from the "kids". This then causes me to buy her a reactionary $599 Ipad Air which the "kids" will give her as an MLK day present..... That woman's manipulation of me is truly masterful.
    Last edited by SONNY WERBLIN; 01-08-2014 at 09:31 AM.

  6. #286

  7. #287
    Just got this Glenmorangie 18 year. I have not tried it yet, but the sixteen men of Tain have yet to let me down.

    IMG_20140119_193203_205-1.jpg

  8. #288
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    Quote Originally Posted by SONNY WERBLIN View Post
    Just got this Glenmorangie 18 year. I have not tried it yet, but the sixteen men of Tain have yet to let me down.

    IMG_20140119_193203_205-1.jpg
    I have it, you won't be disappointed in the least.

  9. #289
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    I received a 2L oak cask for Christmas this year. Went ahead and cured it for the past month, now just added the sherry. Any suggestions for the scotch? I was leaning towards a Macallan 15 yo Fine Oak.

  10. #290
    Do not take a scotch, already aged and blended for consumption.,and put it in one of those small American oak casks. Complete destruction of the scotch.

    You might as well just cut the scotch with some cheap bourbon. That's basically what you are going to do to it.

  11. #291
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    I received a 2L oak cask for Christmas this year. Went ahead and cured it for the past month, now just added the sherry. Any suggestions for the scotch? I was leaning towards a Macallan 15 yo Fine Oak.
    Isn't the Macallan 15 already a "sherried" scotch? I would try the Glenmorangie original. Based on the Lasanta, I'd say it would make a fine palate for some sherry finishing.
    Last edited by SONNY WERBLIN; 01-20-2014 at 03:30 PM.

  12. #292
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    Quote Originally Posted by rex-n-effect View Post
    Do not take a scotch, already aged and blended for consumption.,and put it in one of those small American oak casks. Complete destruction of the scotch.

    You might as well just cut the scotch with some cheap bourbon. That's basically what you are going to do to it.
    Even after I let it sit for a year or so?

    Quote Originally Posted by SONNY WERBLIN View Post
    Isn't the Macallan 15 already a "sherried" scotch? I would try the Glenmorangie original. Based on the Lasanta, I'd say it would make a fine palate for some sherry finishing.
    Good point. Maybe I'll give that a shot.

  13. #293
    Quote Originally Posted by Jetworks View Post
    Even after I let it sit for a year or so?
    New oak has a much more woody flavor than older, used oak. Those sherry casks Macallan uses have had sherry sitting in them for at least three years, which means a decent amount of the oak flavor has been stripped out and a larger amount of sherry has soaked into the wood. So more sherry and less oak flavor comes through. The barrels they use are much, much bigger than a 2L cask. The sherry barrels have much, much less surface to volume ratios which means the oak affects the scotch much slower and more gently. In a small cask you are going to get a lot of oak very quickly. There's no way to approximate the benefit of age without age but with that much surface area of fresh oak you are going to get something that tastes something in the neighborhood of a very dry-tasting bourbon mixed with a vatted scotch. In other words, those delicate flavors you pay good money for will get lost among all the oak flavor.

    You are also putting something very different in your cask than what goes into the barrels at a distillery. They are adding undiluted, unblended liquor straight out of the still. Before packaging it is blended and diluted to bottle strength (although some are bottled at cask strength). It's not just a row of 15 year old barrels in that Macallan 15. There is older scotch. What you have in the bottle won't age the same way as what it was before packaging. It's not going to become Macallan 16.

    If you're really dead set on this idea you might as well use a cheaper blended scotch. Get a couple 1.5l bottles of a blended whisky. Age the sherry for a while in the barrel and then when you dump the barrel keep the sherry. Barrel the scotch for 2-6 months (you'll want to taste it about every 3-4 weeks after the first month). Then figure out a blend between the barrel aged and unbarrel aged portion that doesn't bowl you over with oak flavor. You can even add a little of the sherry if necessary. If you want to get more depth of age in your blend then buy a bottle or two of 10 or 12 year old single malt and add some of that to your blend. That will give you something more interesting and enjoyable and feel more yours than just upending a couple bottles in the cask and hoping for the best. It will also be a lot more fun. With each use the barrel will lose some of its potency. After you have done one or two of these blends the barrel will be more gentle and you can age whiskey with increasing time before it gets oaky enough for you.

  14. #294
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    Quote Originally Posted by rex-n-effect View Post
    New oak has a much more woody flavor than older, used oak. Those sherry casks Macallan uses have had sherry sitting in them for at least three years, which means a decent amount of the oak flavor has been stripped out and a larger amount of sherry has soaked into the wood. So more sherry and less oak flavor comes through. The barrels they use are much, much bigger than a 2L cask. The sherry barrels have much, much less surface to volume ratios which means the oak affects the scotch much slower and more gently. In a small cask you are going to get a lot of oak very quickly. There's no way to approximate the benefit of age without age but with that much surface area of fresh oak you are going to get something that tastes something in the neighborhood of a very dry-tasting bourbon mixed with a vatted scotch. In other words, those delicate flavors you pay good money for will get lost among all the oak flavor.

    You are also putting something very different in your cask than what goes into the barrels at a distillery. They are adding undiluted, unblended liquor straight out of the still. Before packaging it is blended and diluted to bottle strength (although some are bottled at cask strength). It's not just a row of 15 year old barrels in that Macallan 15. There is older scotch. What you have in the bottle won't age the same way as what it was before packaging. It's not going to become Macallan 16.

    If you're really dead set on this idea you might as well use a cheaper blended scotch. Get a couple 1.5l bottles of a blended whisky. Age the sherry for a while in the barrel and then when you dump the barrel keep the sherry. Barrel the scotch for 2-6 months (you'll want to taste it about every 3-4 weeks after the first month). Then figure out a blend between the barrel aged and unbarrel aged portion that doesn't bowl you over with oak flavor. You can even add a little of the sherry if necessary. If you want to get more depth of age in your blend then buy a bottle or two of 10 or 12 year old single malt and add some of that to your blend. That will give you something more interesting and enjoyable and feel more yours than just upending a couple bottles in the cask and hoping for the best. It will also be a lot more fun. With each use the barrel will lose some of its potency. After you have done one or two of these blends the barrel will be more gentle and you can age whiskey with increasing time before it gets oaky enough for you.
    Wow, that's some great insight and advice. I will definitely consider all of what you said. Thanks!!!

  15. #295
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    Weekend starting on the right foot

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1390595366.166722.jpg

  16. #296
    Need some help here fellas. We cleaned out the in-laws house and I found two bottles of scotch unopened. One is a Buchanan deluxe 12 and the other is Dewar's, the Dewar's is from '68, at least that is what the tax ribbon says, NY 68. I cannot find a date on the Buchanan but it has a really old looking cap. Wire looking thing. Can this **** kill me if I drink it. Both have been stored in a cabinet in the living room. The DeWar's is in its original box. Thanks

  17. #297
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    Quote Originally Posted by TKasper01 View Post
    Need some help here fellas. We cleaned out the in-laws house and I found two bottles of scotch unopened. One is a Buchanan deluxe 12 and the other is Dewar's, the Dewar's is from '68, at least that is what the tax ribbon says, NY 68. I cannot find a date on the Buchanan but it has a really old looking cap. Wire looking thing. Can this **** kill me if I drink it. Both have been stored in a cabinet in the living room. The DeWar's is in its original box. Thanks
    If it's unopened, enjoy! If it's been opened, pour it down the sink.

    Edit: My reading comprehension sucks. Bottoms up!

  18. #298
    Quote Originally Posted by Jets Things View Post
    If it's unopened, enjoy! If it's been opened, pour it down the sink.

    Edit: My reading comprehension sucks. Bottoms up!
    Thanks for the info. I will give the Buchanan a shot this weekend.

  19. #299
    Quote Originally Posted by TKasper01 View Post
    Thanks for the info. I will give the Buchanan a shot this weekend.
    Those are probably gonna be really good.

  20. #300
    Quote Originally Posted by rex-n-effect View Post
    New oak has a much more woody flavor than older, used oak. Those sherry casks Macallan uses have had sherry sitting in them for at least three years, which means a decent amount of the oak flavor has been stripped out and a larger amount of sherry has soaked into the wood. So more sherry and less oak flavor comes through. The barrels they use are much, much bigger than a 2L cask. The sherry barrels have much, much less surface to volume ratios which means the oak affects the scotch much slower and more gently. In a small cask you are going to get a lot of oak very quickly. There's no way to approximate the benefit of age without age but with that much surface area of fresh oak you are going to get something that tastes something in the neighborhood of a very dry-tasting bourbon mixed with a vatted scotch. In other words, those delicate flavors you pay good money for will get lost among all the oak flavor.

    You are also putting something very different in your cask than what goes into the barrels at a distillery. They are adding undiluted, unblended liquor straight out of the still. Before packaging it is blended and diluted to bottle strength (although some are bottled at cask strength). It's not just a row of 15 year old barrels in that Macallan 15. There is older scotch. What you have in the bottle won't age the same way as what it was before packaging. It's not going to become Macallan 16.

    If you're really dead set on this idea you might as well use a cheaper blended scotch. Get a couple 1.5l bottles of a blended whisky. Age the sherry for a while in the barrel and then when you dump the barrel keep the sherry. Barrel the scotch for 2-6 months (you'll want to taste it about every 3-4 weeks after the first month). Then figure out a blend between the barrel aged and unbarrel aged portion that doesn't bowl you over with oak flavor. You can even add a little of the sherry if necessary. If you want to get more depth of age in your blend then buy a bottle or two of 10 or 12 year old single malt and add some of that to your blend. That will give you something more interesting and enjoyable and feel more yours than just upending a couple bottles in the cask and hoping for the best. It will also be a lot more fun. With each use the barrel will lose some of its potency. After you have done one or two of these blends the barrel will be more gentle and you can age whiskey with increasing time before it gets oaky enough for you.
    Orrrrrrrrr....you can just buy a bottle of good scotch and enjoy it without the hassle and nonsense.

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