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Thread: New powerful Rick Perry ad

  1. #1
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    New powerful Rick Perry ad

    Say what you want about Rick Perry. He is not my favorite candidate but damn he pulled out all the stops getting this produced.

    [URL]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EL5Atp_vF0&feature=player_embedded[/URL]

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    [URL="http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/09/16/7796858-latest-texas-jobs-figures-shows-net-jobs-loss-unemployment-highest-in-24-years"]firstread.msnbc.msn.com[/URL]


    [QUOTE]
    Texas Gov. Rick Perry's efforts to tout his record on jobs and the economy as a centerpiece of his presidential campagn took a hit today with new figures from one of his own state agencies: [B]They show the Texas unemployment rate increased to 8.5% in August -- the highest level in more than 24 years and more than twice the rate when Perry took office in December 2000.
    [/B]

    The new unemployment rate for Texas is still below the national average of 9.1%. But the new figures from the Texas Workforce Commission included some disturbing trends: [B]There was a net jobs loss of 1,300 in Texas during the month of August, even worse than than the latest national figures showing zero job growth.
    [/B]

    While the private sector did add 8,100 jobs in Texas during August, this was more than offset by a shrinking public sector resulting in the loss of 9,400 government jobs, state figures show.

    State officials blamed national economic trends. "Texas continues to feel the pressures of a stagnant national economy," said Texas Workforce Commmission chairman Tom Pauken.

    But the figures also show some key sectors of the Texas economy losing strength during the month: Trade and transportation, mining, information, and leisure all experienced job losses. Mark Lavergne, a spokesman for the commission, confirmed that the new unemployment rate of 8.5% -- up slightly from 8.4% the previous month -- is the highest unemployment rate for Texas since July, 1987. When Perry took office in December 2000 after George W. Bush resigned, the unemployment rate in Texas was 4.2%

    At this week's GOP presidential rate, Perry touted his record of "creating more than one million jobs" in Texas, but made no mention of the recent downward trends in the state's economy. A spokesman for his campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the latest figures.

    *** UPDATE *** Perry's campaign this afternoon responded:

    "Texas is not immune to the effects of the national recession," said Ray Sullivan, Perry's chief spokesman. "Yet Texas continues to outperform the rest of the country and is still home to roughly 40% of the net new jobs created nationwide since June 2009."

    He continued: "And even during this national economic downturn, which the president's misguided policies have only worsened, Texas remains the nation's top economy, attracting jobs and growing by more than 1,000 people a day. As president, Gov. Perry will get our nation's fiscal house in order, free employers from the onerous tax and regulatory burdens undermining our economy, and restore confidence in private sector job creators across this nation so we can get America working again."

    [/QUOTE]

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    [QUOTE][B]Texas ranks last in the nation in high school diplomas[/B][/QUOTE]


    [URL="http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2010/jul/26/texas-ranks-last-nation-high-school-diplomas/"]//www.pegasusnews.com/news[/URL]


    [QUOTE]
    How can Texas rank last in the nation — 51st — in the percentage of adults with high school diplomas, and simultaneously rank 22nd in the percentage attending at least some college?

    The complicated answer involves more than the quality of the K-12 education system. The figures, based on the percentage of adults over 25 years old with various levels of education, come from a review of 2008 census bureau data by the Brookings Institution, which put data on education attainment from every state into this nifty web widget. It came as part of a larger study called the State of Metropolitan America, released in May (which includes some other interesting data on Texas cities).

    In educational attainment, Texas ranked all over the map: [B]51st in high school (79.6 percent); 22nd in some college (22.6 percent); 44th in associate’s degrees (6.3 percent); 31st in bachelor’s degrees (25.3 percent); and 36th in graduate degrees (8.3 percent). [/B]The leading factor driving down the state’s rankings has little to do with the quality of public schools and everything to do with the rapid rate of immigration, said Alan Berube, senior fellow and research director at Brookings, a left-leaning policy think-tank.

    Many Mexican and Latin American immigrants “came to Texas as adults. They didn’t come there to finish high school. They came there to work. So that depresses the indicator,” Berube says. Further, the wide gap between high school and college attainment indicates a relatively large percentage of Texans who do complete high school go on to college, with many graduating, he says.

    The same trends can be seen in California — the other huge state with rapid growth in immigration — with an even more severe spread between high school and college attainment. The Sunshine State ranked 49th in high school attainment, yet 15th and 16th, respectively, in the percentage of adults with bachelor’s and graduate degrees.

    In addition, the rankings can be deceiving because almost every state in the nation is clustered between 80 and 90 percent, so the state ranking last isn’t necessarily so far behind others ranking much higher. “But somebody’s got to be 51st,” Berube said, “and it turns out that’s Texas.”

    At the same time, Houston, Austin and Dallas are three among only nine cities in America with the rare combination of fast growth, high levels of ethnic diversity and high educational attainment, Berube said. San Antonio, El Paso and McAllen, unfortunately, have the fast growth and diversity — but low educational attainment.

    While some of the data should give policymakers concerns, none of it should be interpreted as solely a failure of the Texas education system, Berube said. Many Texas adults grew up elsewhere, and fast growth in Texas cities speaks for itself — people who live elsewhere want to move here. As for education levels, the real demographic shift will come when today’s second- and third-graders — who are Hispanic and low-income in higher percentages than today’s Texas teenagers — get into high school. In 2008, the Hispanic population represented 36 percent of all Texans, but 46 percent of births, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. The latest enrollment report from the Texas Education Agency, from the 2008-09 school year, shows that Hispanic students now account for 48 percent of public school enrollment — and 65 percent of pre-kindergarten enrollment.

    How Texas public schools perform in educating these students — many from Spanish-speaking families without a history of high school and college graduation — largely will determine the future prosperity of the state. The current levels of educational attainment are “certainly something to be concerned about,” Berube said. “But the focus should be more properly on how the schools are doing with the children of these immigrants.”

    [/QUOTE]
    Last edited by Buster; 09-21-2011 at 10:58 AM.

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    [QUOTE][B]Under Perry, Texas leads in job growth, though many are low-wage[/B][/QUOTE]


    [URL="http://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/perry-watch/headlines/20110820-under-perry-texas-leads-in-job-growth-though-many-are-low-wage.ece"]www.dallasnews.com/[/URL]


    [QUOTE]

    By ROBERT T. GARRETT and BRENDAN CASE
    Staff Writers
    Published: 20 August 2011 10:58 PM


    Gov. Rick Perry says he can fix America’s desperate jobs problem, and Texas has been adding jobs more quickly than the nation as a whole in both the short term and the long term.

    [B]But a review of Texas employment trends shows substantial growth in low-wage jobs since he took office in 2000 — especially at the bottom rungs of the restaurant and construction industries.[/B]

    [B]Jobs as food preparer-servers, waiters and waitresses, which generally pay about $9 an hour, increased by 120,000 positions in Texas over the past 11 years, or more than twice the national growth rate, a Dallas Morning News analysis of occupational data found.[/B]

    [B]The state’s construction laborers, paid an average of about $12 an hour, also surged, their ranks swelling 35 percent in Texas even as they declined 5 percent nationally.[/B]

    Meanwhile, Texas closely tracked national trends as one-fifth of coveted [B]slots as managers in private companies and government agencies disappeared between 2000 and 2010, according to the News’ analysis. The state lost nearly 40,000 of the managerial jobs, [/B]which had average salaries breaking into six figures.

    While Texas payrolls are nearly back to their all-time peak in August 2008, in sharp contrast to the dire national jobs picture, experts say the jobs added during Perry’s watch are a mixed bag. Some are entry-level, no-benefits positions, though others in sales, nursing and teaching are higher-wage occupations growing faster than the state population.

    Critics say the state’s job growth has been based largely on cheap labor, lax regulations, population growth and the state’s mineral wealth.

    [B] “You want to build your state on the backbone of a strong middle class, not create falsely positive statistics by growing the part of your population that has low-wage jobs,” said Douglas Hall, who coordinates a network of state advocacy groups at the liberal Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C. “An economic miracle is not happening when you have got nearly one-quarter of the kids in your state living in poverty,” said Hall, referring to Texas’ 24 percent child poverty rate in 2009.[/B]

    [B]He and others emphasized that last year, Texas was tied with Mississippi for having the country’s highest share of hourly workers — 9.5 percent — who earn no more than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour.
    [/B]

    Other experts, though, noted that Texas has no state minimum wage so that when the federal minimum goes up, as it did in July 2009, the number of Texans in the at- or under-minimum wage category leaps. The state’s youthful population and significant agricultural sector almost guarantee a high ranking, they said.

    Perry credits policies

    Texas is more than a low-wage paradise. The state’s median wage last year was in the middle of the pack: $15.14 an hour, 29th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and 93 percent of the national average. Since 2008, the year the recession intensified, Texas has ranked sixth in the nation in median wage growth.

    Moreover, the growth of low-wage jobs is part of a national trend that is hardly unique to Texas.

    “Opportunities are increasingly concentrated in high-skill, high-wage jobs and in low-skill, low-wage jobs,” David Autor, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist, wrote in a research paper last year.

    On the stump, Perry often cites how even a low-wage job can be a boon to a family and community. In other states, any kind of job can be hard to come by, the Republican governor says, describing hard times in states such as Michigan, Illinois and California. In addition, Texas has a lower cost of living than many other big states, so it takes less income to afford a middle-class lifestyle.

    Perry doesn’t go out of his way to credit the economic momentum he inherited or the state’s high birth rate, mild climate and proximity to Mexico. He largely attributes state job growth to policy decisions.

    “I know how to create jobs,” Perry said last Monday as he campaigned at the Iowa State Fair. “You let the private sector, free them up from overtaxation, free them up from overregulation, free them up from overlitigation, and then government, get out of the way!”

    Keeping costs down

    John Doggett, a lecturer in management at the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin, points to several tailwinds for Texas. Public education improvements that began in the 1980s, cheap housing and attractive suburban cities that are within a reasonable commute of jobs have combined with the lack of a state income tax to lure high-tech and other desirable companies, he said.

    “A big part of what’s happened is that we’ve had a policy in this state that says we’re going to try to keep costs down,” he said. “This place is going to do well for a long while — unless we do something stupid.”

    Looking at broad categories of employment since the national recession ended in June 2009, Texas job growth has been concentrated in education and health services; a job category that includes retail; professional and business services; and another that includes oil and gas extraction. While average wages in the first two are below the state average, the latter two typically offer higher-than-average pay.

    Another job gainer the last few years: government — which Perry often bashes on the campaign trail. Since the U.S. recession began in late 2007, private sector employment in Texas has fallen slightly, while public sector employment has increased. Government jobs have been declining this year, however, and state spending cuts may lead to additional job losses.

    Because of Texas’ rapid population growth, it still needs some 630,000 jobs to return to pre-recession unemployment rates, said Hall of the Economic Policy Institute. That’s 5.6 percent of the 11.2 million people with jobs the state had in June, according to the data series used to calculate the jobless rate. Thirty-four states had a bigger “jobs deficit” in percentage terms, he said.

    Liberal groups say that to create more high-wage jobs, Congress should raise the minimum wage and Texas should improve education, invest more heavily in renewable energy and work off a backlog of needed infrastructure projects. Conservatives, though, are skeptical that state government can help, and they prefer a hands-off approach.

    ‘Hollowing out’ of jobs

    Recent national studies have shown a “hollowing out” of mid- and higher-wage jobs. There are indications — though not conclusive evidence — of that in the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics survey data for the past 11 years on the state’s top 25 occupations.

    Two of the best-paid categories hemorrhaged jobs. One was the general and operations managers, who last year made an average of more than $53 an hour. The other was executive secretaries/executive administrative assistants who earned almost $22 an hour, though a bureau change of definition since 2000 may help explain why there are about 7,300 fewer of those posts.

    Three of the better-paying occupations slipped in the rankings because they’re barely growing — in single percentage points — far more slowly than the state population. They were first-line supervisors of office and administrative support workers (average wage, $24.72); truck drivers ($17.86); and maintenance and repair workers ($15.26).

    But of the top 10 occupations in the state, only two — nurses and elementary school teachers — earned on average more than $15 an hour last year. For the nurses, mean pay was $31.82 an hour; and for the teachers, on a 12-month basis, it was $24.56.

    [B]Many of the huge, fast-growing categories are lower-wage occupations: food preparer-servers ($8.60 an hour), cashiers ($8.93), waiters and waitresses ($8.98), retail salespeople ($11.48) and office clerks ($13.50).[/B]

    [B]“Is this something to complain about? No,” said Eva DeLuna Castro, who tracks incomes and poverty data for the progressive Center for Public Policy Priorities in Austin. “On the flip side, it’s nothing to brag about, either. Our demographic trends have been in place so long that just by having more people, you’re going to produce more jobs.”
    [/B]

    Staff writer Christy Hoppe contributed to this story from Des Moines, Iowa.

    [email]rtgarrett@dallasnews.com[/email]

    [email]bcase@dallasnews.com[/email]

    [/QUOTE]

  5. #5
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    We're entering into a golden era for GOP ad makers. "President Zero" has given them so much to work with.

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    The Fear - its palpable! :banana:

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    I take it Buster does not like Mr. Perry.

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    [QUOTE=Buster;4152700][URL="http://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/perry-watch/headlines/20110820-under-perry-texas-leads-in-job-growth-though-many-are-low-wage.ece"]www.dallasnews.com/[/URL][/QUOTE]

    So Buster your response to me saying I am not a Perry guy but I thought his ad was well produced it to post articles that say Perry's state is doing the best under a bad situation and linking a bunch of "yeah but" articles.

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=Trades;4152743]So Buster your response to me saying I am not a Perry guy but I thought his ad was well produced it to post articles that say Perry's state is doing the best under a bad situation and linking a bunch of "yeah but" articles.[/QUOTE]
    Quantum mentioned fear, that palpable fear.

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    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;4152742]I take it Buster does not like Mr. Perry.[/QUOTE]

    He doesn't like succcessful Republican governors in general.

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    [QUOTE=sackdance;4152775]Quantum mentioned fear, that palpable fear.[/QUOTE]

    It's palpable, [I]and[/I] you can taste it.

    :yes:

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    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;4152742]I take it Buster does not like Mr. Perry.[/QUOTE]

    I do not.

    But I am also just presenting some facts.

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    [QUOTE=Trades;4152743]So Buster your response to me saying I am not a Perry guy but I thought his ad was well produced it to post articles that say Perry's state is doing the best under a bad situation and linking a bunch of "yeah but" articles.[/QUOTE]

    Do you believe in considering all of the facts?

    Or are you just a cheerleader?

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=Buster;4152887]Do you believe in considering all of the facts?

    Or are you just a cheerleader?[/QUOTE]

    Not a cheerleader. I was simply impressed by the ad. As I said there is a lot I don't like about Perry starting with the prayer session for rain and the growth of his stae goverenment. I am just happy to see conservatives willing to use media, especially social media (posting on Youtube and his web site) to get their word out. I feel this was a big issue with McCain's run.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=SONNY WERBLIN;4152742]I take it Buster does not like Mr. Perry.[/QUOTE]

    i love Rick Perry. He's an implosion waiting to happen. Go Rick.

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    [QUOTE=quantum;4152729]The Fear - its palpable! :banana:[/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=sackdance;4152775]Quantum mentioned fear, that palpable fear.[/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=sackdance;4152775]Quantum mentioned fear, that palpable fear.[/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=Frequent Flyer;4152788]It's palpable, [I]and[/I] you can taste it.
    :yes:[/QUOTE]

    Good rebuttal to those articles and defense of Governor Perry's record. You guys (or is it singular) Rock!

    Was Palpable on todays vocabulary test?


    [QUOTE=Ernie;4152784]He doesn't like succcessful Republican governors in general.[/QUOTE]

    Is there another succesful republican Governor?
    I am unaware of him/her

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    [QUOTE=Buster;4152904]Good rebuttal to those articles [/QUOTE]

    I didn't read those articles, and going by how you cut and pasted them in such rapid succession, I doubt you did, either.

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    [QUOTE=Trades;4152649]Say what you want about Rick Perry. He is not my favorite candidate but damn he pulled out all the stops getting this produced.

    [URL]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EL5Atp_vF0&feature=player_embedded[/URL][/QUOTE]

    WOW that is a powerful ad. Great stuff.

  19. #19
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    So Perry represents.....


    ...wait for it....































    CHANGE? :confused:

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=Buster;4152883]I do not.

    But I am also just presenting some "facts".[/QUOTE]

    more accurate

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