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Thread: Beer Thread: 2012 style

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaoulDuke View Post

    And this wheat beer which was excellent

    I love Weihenstephaner. They've been around for over 1000 years, and it shows in their beers. All of them are extremely well crafted.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by sourceworx View Post
    I love Weihenstephaner. They've been around for over 1000 years, and it shows in their beers. All of them are extremely well crafted.
    I'm trying to get logistics setup to get a case through my buddy directly from Germany.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaoulDuke View Post
    I'm trying to get logistics setup to get a case through my buddy directly from Germany.
    You can't find it anywhere in France? Their stuff is fairly easy to find over here.

  4. #104
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    Not really into most of these frou-frou girlie quasi-wine beers, (I mean ales) but I just got this as a gift:

    Ommegang Gift Set


    Ommegang Gnomegang 750 ml, Ommegang Three Philosophers 750 ml, Ommegang Hennepin 750 ml and a handsomely branded Belgian Beer glass.


    I'm kind of indiffererent about craft beers in general. Now that they're owned or invested in by Duvel have they "sold out" and "gone downhill"?

    They're corked like champagne, so I have no idea whether they should be
    stored upright, laid on their side so the cork stays moist, chilled, room temp, etc. for best taste (Currently in their box at room temperature)

    Which one by JI consensus is "best" and I should try 1st.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by sourceworx View Post
    You can't find it anywhere in France? Their stuff is fairly easy to find over here.
    Culturally, we're more of a wine country even though we're surrounded by Beer countries. Every bar or store has middle of the road beers. Once you want to try different stuff, you have to go online or beer stores which are both rare and pricey.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post
    Not really into most of these frou-frou girlie quasi-wine beers, (I mean ales) but I just got this as a gift:

    Ommegang Gift Set


    Ommegang Gnomegang 750 ml, Ommegang Three Philosophers 750 ml, Ommegang Hennepin 750 ml and a handsomely branded Belgian Beer glass.


    I'm kind of indiffererent about craft beers in general. Now that they're owned or invested in by Duvel have they "sold out" and "gone downhill"?

    They're corked like champagne, so I have no idea whether they should be
    stored upright, laid on their side so the cork stays moist, chilled, room temp, etc. for best taste (Currently in their box at room temperature)

    Which one by JI consensus is "best" and I should try 1st.
    I believe Ommegang has been at least partially owned by Duvel for years. They've always brewed Belgian-inspired beers, which are usually bottle-conditioned and naturally carbonated. Duvel is a well-respected brewer, so most people don't look down on Ommegang for being owned by them.

    Bottle conditioning means they are aged in the bottle, as opposed to a secondary fermentation. Natural carbonation means the beer is unfiltered, so yeast is still present in the beer. A small amount of sugar is added to beer before it is bottled and sealed (home brewers bottle their beers in similar fashion). The yeast ferments the sugar (it's such a small amount that is adds very little alcohol), but a bi-product of fermentation is the yeast releases CO2. Since the bottle is sealed and there is nowhere for the gas to escape, it gets infused into the beer.

    Belgian beers tend to be stronger as well. That's why they are typically served in a goblet or chalice. If you drink a liter of it from German stein, you'll be laid out on the floor.

    I'm guessing by classifying them as "girlie," you mean that when you drink beer, you want to DRINK. You want to enjoy a few pints or mugs and still be able to function. You don't want one small glass where you sip it slowly and stick your pinky out. I'm the same way.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaoulDuke View Post
    Culturally, we're more of a wine country even though we're surrounded by Beer countries. Every bar or store has middle of the road beers. Once you want to try different stuff, you have to go online or beer stores which are both rare and pricey.
    I know that. But I figured craft beer, and especially brews from the old school European breweries would have some popularity throughout the continent.

    Italy is also more of a wine-drinking country, and even they have craft breweries that are sprouting up.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by sourceworx View Post
    I know that. But I figured craft beer, and especially brews from the old school European breweries would have some popularity throughout the continent.

    Italy is also more of a wine-drinking country, and even they have craft breweries that are sprouting up.
    I wasn't mocking just explaining. The equivalent of US liquor stores here are 99% wine and champagne with a few Belgian beers (Duvel, Chimay..). You really have to go out of your way to find a beer store.

    I've found excellent French beers on line I'd never heard of.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaoulDuke View Post
    Culturally, we're more of a wine country even though we're surrounded by Beer countries. Every bar or store has middle of the road beers. Once you want to try different stuff, you have to go online or beer stores which are both rare and pricey.
    That is very strange that France would not also have some great beer producers. With Belgium and Germany so close, I would have thought there would be some spillover.

    _

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post
    They're corked like champagne, so I have no idea whether they should be
    stored upright, laid on their side so the cork stays moist, chilled, room temp, etc. for best taste (Currently in their box at room temperature)

    Which one by JI consensus is "best" and I should try 1st.
    If there are specific storage and serving temperatures, they usually write them on the bottle.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by sourceworx View Post
    I believe Ommegang has been at least partially owned by Duvel for years. They've always brewed Belgian-inspired beers, which are usually bottle-conditioned and naturally carbonated. Duvel is a well-respected brewer, so most people don't look down on Ommegang for being owned by them.

    Bottle conditioning means they are aged in the bottle, as opposed to a secondary fermentation. Natural carbonation means the beer is unfiltered, so yeast is still present in the beer. A small amount of sugar is added to beer before it is bottled and sealed (home brewers bottle their beers in similar fashion). The yeast ferments the sugar (it's such a small amount that is adds very little alcohol), but a bi-product of fermentation is the yeast releases CO2. Since the bottle is sealed and there is nowhere for the gas to escape, it gets infused into the beer.

    Belgian beers tend to be stronger as well. That's why they are typically served in a goblet or chalice. If you drink a liter of it from German stein, you'll be laid out on the floor.

    I'm guessing by classifying them as "girlie," you mean that when you drink beer, you want to DRINK. You want to enjoy a few pints or mugs and still be able to function. You don't want one small glass where you sip it slowly and stick your pinky out. I'm the same way.
    SW, Thank you for your comments. One of them says to drink at 50 (slight chiill) but what of the others?

    As I enjoy beer, ale, liquor, and licquers but not so much wine/sparkling wines I think the most off-putting thing for me is, I'm OK with hops, and hints of spice and citrus in the beer (I find S. Adams Summer Ale refreshing in the heat) but as I don't really like shandys (e.g.Leinenkugel) I'm leery of a heavy fruit, chocolate or oatmeal presence in my beer. If I wanted a bowl of oatmeal , chocolate bar or Cherry Kijafa I'd have those.

    I think we talked about this but outside of home brews, what are the mixtures people like to make here of any alcoholic product? ("Black and tan)


    I'm not a beer snob, but quality tells. I will try anything and also find some of the cheapest beers eminently drinkable, Natty Boh (which is made by Miller under contract and is essentially Miller HL or MGD) Sol, and the Canadian brands (not as exports)-although BTD Molson Golden was a favorite here,Molson Export Ale has been one of mine. Molson Export on tap at a Rangers-Leafs game in Toronto one time was particularly refreshing. The strong beers esp. the Quebec versions of stalwarts such as Black Label are favorites as well.

    Teh same friend bought me a 12 pack in Canada (maybe duty free which still has "Brador" which I happen to like) of "Rickard's" which is a Molson brand. Expecting little I wasn't bowled over but I found the "White", which may be Blue Moon in a different marque, surprisingly good and preferable to such as Hoegarden.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by JStokes View Post
    That is very strange that France would not also have some great beer producers. With Belgium and Germany so close, I would have thought there would be some spillover.

    _
    The North of France is a big beer drinking region being so close to Belgium. A large part of craft beers come from there.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post


    SW, Thank you for your comments. One of them says to drink at 50 (slight chiill) but what of the others?

    As I enjoy beer, ale, liquor, and licquers but not so much wine/sparkling wines I think the most off-putting thing for me is, I'm OK with hops, and hints of spice and citrus in the beer (I find S. Adams Summer Ale refreshing in the heat) but as I don't really like shandys (e.g.Leinenkugel) I'm leery of a heavy fruit, chocolate or oatmeal presence in my beer. If I wanted a bowl of oatmeal , chocolate bar or Cherry Kijafa I'd have those.
    I hear you. I know a lot of people who are put off by beers that have a lot of adjuncts. That said, when done right they can be quite good. The flavors from those additions need to be subtle. A local brewpub out here brews a chocolate doppelbock that is excellent. They also brew an oatmeal stout that in my opinion is the best stout I've ever had.

    But I've also had Sam Adams' Cherry Wheat, which tastes like Robitussin. It's nasty.



    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post
    I think we talked about this but outside of home brews, what are the mixtures people like to make here of any alcoholic product? ("Black and tan)

    I'm not a beer snob, but quality tells. I will try anything and also find some of the cheapest beers eminently drinkable, Natty Boh (which is made by Miller under contract and is essentially Miller HL or MGD) Sol, and the Canadian brands (not as exports)-although BTD Molson Golden was a favorite here,Molson Export Ale has been one of mine. Molson Export on tap at a Rangers-Leafs game in Toronto one time was particularly refreshing. The strong beers esp. the Quebec versions of stalwarts such as Black Label are favorites as well.

    Teh same friend bought me a 12 pack in Canada (maybe duty free which still has "Brador" which I happen to like) of "Rickard's" which is a Molson brand. Expecting little I wasn't bowled over but I found the "White", which may be Blue Moon in a different marque, surprisingly good and preferable to such as Hoegarden.
    The white you're referring to is a Belgian wit. And you're correct it is the same style as Blue Moon and Hoegaarden. They are excellent beers. Similar to German hefe-weizens, but with orange peel and coriander added.

    As for blending beers, other than black and tans I'm not a fan of them.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by JStokes View Post
    That is very strange that France would not also have some great beer producers. With Belgium and Germany so close, I would have thought there would be some spillover.

    _
    Only along the border with Belgium. They have a style known as Biere de Garde, which is very similar to Belgian saisons.

    My guess is the French are so prideful of their wines that they don't bother with beer.

  15. #115
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    I find BeerAdvocate, while only one measure, is a good starting point to judge a beer.

    They like Pliny The Elder

    http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/863/7971

    Available out East in Phila. predominantly.

    http://russianriverbrewing.com/phila...a-distributor/

    They are an offshoot of Korbel wines, who no longer owns them.



    I'll check Liquor Outlet in Boonton or that place I cant remember the name of Bridgewater to see if they can get some for me.

    Or ill just take a quick ride down to one of the nearest on the list to get some

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaoulDuke View Post
    Culturally, we're more of a wine country even though we're surrounded by Beer countries.
    I went to a bar that carried pretty much nothing but Belgian ales by the Les Halles subway station. This was in the 90's though. It was next to a shop that had rat traps in the window with fake rats in the traps. I don't have any idea
    what it was, maybe an exterminator. It wasn't far from a museum that had a lot of crazy colored steel beams.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timmy® View Post
    It was next to a shop that had rat traps in the window with fake rats in the traps. I don't have any idea
    what it was, maybe an exterminator. It wasn't far from a museum that had a lot of crazy colored steel beams.




    Were you really in France...or did you bump your head running from the chickens?



    "hey I'm in France, muthaf**rgers! Whooo!!! bEAMS, man!!!whooo France!!!!"


    "Timmmmy...please come inside....please..."


    -



    -

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by 32green View Post




    Were you really in France...or did you bump your head running from the chickens?



    "hey I'm in France, muthaf**rgers! Whooo!!! bEAMS, man!!!whooo France!!!!"


    "Timmmmy...please come inside....please..."


    -



    -
    Yes, I've been to Europe many times. Wish I could go more often. Thought Paris and France were great.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jungle Shift Jet View Post



    I'm not a beer snob, but quality tells. I will try anything and also find some of the cheapest beers eminently drinkable, Natty Boh (which is made by Miller under contract and is essentially Miller HL or MGD) Sol, and the Canadian brands (not as exports)-although BTD Molson Golden was a favorite here,Molson Export Ale has been one of mine. Molson Export on tap at a Rangers-Leafs game in Toronto one time was particularly refreshing. The strong beers esp. the Quebec versions of stalwarts such as Black Label are favorites as well.

    Teh same friend bought me a 12 pack in Canada (maybe duty free which still has "Brador" which I happen to like) of "Rickard's" which is a Molson brand. Expecting little I wasn't bowled over but I found the "White", which may be Blue Moon in a different marque, surprisingly good and preferable to such as Hoegarden.

    I still consider the best beer I ever had was a bottle of Labatts Blue at the Seven Dwarfs restaurant in London Ontario circa 1980. I was travelling through Ontario with my dad. Back then there was a big difference between the Canadian versions and the crap they exported to the US. Today, Labatts or Moulsons tastes like azz in Canada or the US. Most of the concerts I go to are at the Belle Centre in Montreal and I've had plenty of their domestic stuff made for the Canadian market. Might as well get Budweiser or Schlitz.

  20. #120
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    I just tried a really hoppy ale from Vermont called Heady-Topper. Excellent stuff. It has an unfiltered, robust flavor almost reminiscent of a hefeweizen. I'd definitely recommend some if you ever get to the area. Perfect beer for a slightly-chilly spring afternoon.

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