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Thread: Jets "SAFETY" watch

  1. #61
    [QUOTE=Dunnie;4383252]????? Cromartie is a stellar cover corner. One of the best in the league.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD[/QUOTE]

    He had 4 horrendous games in 2011. That's 25% of our games. That's blowing our chance at a divisional title.

  2. #62
    [QUOTE=jetssjumets;4382868]I hear what you are saying. But who is that domianting pass rusher that will be there at #16? Are you suggesting we get Mario Williams in FA?

    Also, that slow NYG linebacker was aided in the fact that Gronk was hindered due to his injury. How many times do we need to see a TE beating the living crap out of us. TEs seem to have a field day against the Jets.

    [B]In my opinion, the Jets need to draft Barron at 16 -- hopefully he is there.[/B][/QUOTE]

    He WILL be there. Guy is viewed a lower first round pick almost universally. The Jets are his ceiling as far as where he will go in the 1st.

  3. #63
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    Some Safety thoughts

    1. KJ, Shut TF up. Here I was trying desperately to keep DeCoud UNDER the radar, and you go and give a well reasoned post about what a great pick up this guy would be for a team that needs a coverage S. Nice job :rolleyes:

    I was looking at Griffith as the Pats target, when I read something about DeCoud that made me think that he'd be a better value in the FA market. I'd be happy with Griffith, but I think DeCoud is the better pick up.

    Nice out of the box pick up KJ, but I don't think the Jets will be able to afford even this kid's price....and unfortunately for the Jets (and to a lesser degree the Pats), this is NOT a good year for coverage Safeties. As lopz27 pointed out so well, NEXT will be a great one. I think BOTH the Jets and Pats could have gone a long way in solving their S issues if Armstrong, Lester, and McDonald had chosen not to go back to school.

    BTW- If I were the Jets and if Trent Richardson was not there at 16, I'd look to trade down and get more picks and try and wind up with 2 picks each in the 2nd and 3rd rounds. The Jets need bodies, and that's a way to get them, because its not going to happen in FA

  4. #64
    [QUOTE=Schroy48;4383251]I think it is time to consider Cromarte at FS.

    His skills at CB have declined and with his height and long arms he could improve the S position overall. He also would help more at S against gronkowski than at CB.

    Leonard is DONE. We cant rely on the (very) little guy anymore - sadly. His best years are definitely behond him and he should be groomed at a DB coach very soon.[/QUOTE]

    Oh dear lord, please stop posting...

  5. #65
    [QUOTE=Schroy48;4383251]I think it is time to consider Cromarte at FS.

    [B]His skills at CB have declined[/B] and with his height and long arms he could improve the S position overall. He also would help more at S against gronkowski than at CB.

    Leonard is DONE. We cant rely on the (very) little guy anymore - sadly. His best years are definitely behond him and he should be groomed at a DB coach very soon.[/QUOTE]

    Do you even watch the games? Cro had a damn good 2nd half..Cro acknowledged after the 2nd Pats game he needed to work paraphrasing work harder and become more of a student of the game..He can't get by on his talent alone




    [B]Published: Saturday, December 17, 2011, 11:45 PM[/B]

    Dennis Thurman had anticipated this moment for 21 months, ever since the [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/"]Jets[/URL] traded for cornerback Antonio Cromartie in March of last year. It finally happened last week, on the practice field during team drills.

    “For 5 years, I did it on physical talent,” Cromartie admitted to Thurman. “I see why I need to do more.”

    The Jets’ defensive backs coach, and defensive coordinator Mike Pettine, and head coach Rex Ryan, had been waiting for their perhaps most physically gifted player to evolve from mercurial to consistent.

    They reinforced the techniques that have made counterpart Darrelle Revis the best in the league, namely using his hands aggressively at the line of scrimmage, and relying on his eyes and quick feet down the field.

    They weathered Cromartie’s maddening peaks and valleys early this season: two touchdowns surrendered on opening night, two interceptions the next week, then four penalties the game after that.

    But the past few weeks, the coaching staff’s patience has seemed to pay off. Now playing for the Jets, they say, is the best Antonio Cromartie they have seen — just in time for their playoff push, continuing this afternoon in Philadelphia against the Eagles.

    “He decided that he was going to be a great player, and I think that’s what it is, because he’s got as much God-given ability as any corner I’ve ever been around,” Ryan said. “When he’s playing at a high level, our defense plays at a high level.”
    • • •
    Cromartie, of course, was the other party in this summer’s high-stakes [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/07/nnamdi_asomugha_goes_to_philad.html"]bidding war for Nnamdi Asomugha.[/URL] The 27-year-old waited at his home in California — “sitting back and relaxing” — while Asomugha largely froze the free-agent market for cornerbacks, keeping the Jets and other suitors on ice as he weighed his options.

    Asomugha will be on the opposite sideline with the Eagles today. About 48 hours after the former Raiders star turned down the Jets for a more lucrative offer in Philadelphia, Jets general manager Mike Tannenbaum closed in on a four-year, $32 million deal with Cromartie.

    The Jets knew Cromartie had been prone to inconsistent play during his first season with the team in 2010. They also knew about his wealth of physical gifts that cannot be taught, including 6-2 size, 4.4 speed and 6-7 wingspan. They were confident their coaching could bridge the gap.

    “It’s almost like the light is coming on for him,” Thurman explained. “Because there was, for whatever reason, a little hesitation in terms of some of the things that we really emphasized to him. It took him awhile.”

    Thurman likened Cromartie to a 44 percent basketball shooter who is told by a coach that if he changes his technique slightly, he could make 51 percent of his shots. A 30 percent shooter would jump at the chance. But a 44 percent shooter may be reluctant, because he is already having success.

    So Thurman was patient while Cromartie, now in his sixth NFL season, tentatively absorbed the technical minutiae that separate good cornerbacks from great ones. During the offseason, the coaches produced a cut-ups reel to prove to Cromartie the difference when he knocks receivers off the line of scrimmage vs. when he does not.

    That reinforcement carried over into practice this fall. Thurman avoided brow-beating but used the practice tape as proof, calmly pointing out, “Cro, see what happened?” Thurman often reminded him to “keep your eyes on your work,” meaning that he must make sure he is in position with the receiver to make a play before looking for the ball.

    Midway through this season, Cromartie’s coaches and teammates noticed a change. Pettine said it started after the bye week. Thurman pinned it more recently, after the home New England loss in Week 10.

    The Jets’ secondary was “exposed” in that game by Tom Brady and Co., Thurman admitted. The defense allowed 329 passing yards and three touchdown catches, often appearing out of position or overmatched.

    The game film was humbling across the board. Cromartie watched himself look silly on a 12-yard catch by Chad Ochocinco on the Patriots’ first drive. He turned back for the ball at least three seconds too soon, ending up more than 10 yards downfield when Ochocinco hauled in the pass.


    Thurman issued a challenge to his defensive backs after that game: This is what happens when you are inconsistent. Are you going to be as good as you think you can be? The focus of the group changed, he said, and Cromartie was at the front of the line.

    “There are doubters every day,” Cromartie said. “My job is to prove doubters wrong, and try to help this team and this organization get to the big game, and that’s the Super Bowl.”
    • • • 
    Cromartie has acknowledged his early ups and downs and, looking back, he attributes them to a quest for perfection. When he made a mistake, he did not always have the short memory his position requires. He worked on thinking less, while also vowing to use his practice time to commit the techniques preached by Thurman to muscle memory. Ryan has a saying: “Master your habits, or your habits will master you.”

    The only touchdown Cromartie has given up since the second New England loss came off a fluky deflection that landed in the hands of former teammate Brad Smith, now with the Bills. Through the first six games, Cromartie had surrendered all three of the opponents’ passing touchdowns.


    He has allowed completions on just 37.5 percent of passes directed his way in the past four games, below his season average, according to the football statistics website Pro Football Focus.

    For the season, he has the league’s fifth-best burn percentage (42.5) among cornerbacks who have been targeted at least 60 times, according to Statspass. Revis ranks third.

    Last week’s victory against Kansas City was the most consistent 60 minutes Thurman has seen Cromartie play. On a fade route to Jonathan Baldwin in the second half, Cromartie was the aggressor at the line of scrimmage, disrupting the timing of the route so the throw was off.

    Thurman was also proud of a third-down stop on which Cromartie smartly bailed on press coverage to back up and protect against a deep throw, tackling the receiver short of the first-down marker.

    “He’s responded, I think, to the situation,” Pettine said. “He’s been challenged by me, by Dennis Thurman, by Rex. He’s a prideful guy, and he wants to succeed.”

    Those challenges have been in private and public, notably [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/10/jets_account_for_antonio_croma.html"]Pettine’s comments about Cromartie’s vexing inconsistency[/URL] at a press conference before the San Diego Chargers game in Week 7.

    Pettine said he was at a loss for the reason behind Cromartie’s unpredictable play, deadpanning that perhaps it’s “a horoscope thing.” He also revealed that he calls down to Thurman on game day over the headset, asking whether the Jets had “good Cro” or “bad Cro” that day, and would adjust his defensive calls accordingly.

    Cromartie heard. He and Pettine had an informal conversation. Pettine told his player that his words came out differently in print than he had intended — though looking back, maybe his candor was a good thing.

    The last time he’s had to adjust for “bad Cro?” “I haven’t had one in a while,” Pettine said. Thurman added more definitively: “It doesn’t happen.”

    Instead, the Jets now see a player brimming with confidence. On the practice field, Cromartie will shout out two or three possible plays as soon as the scout team lines up in a formation, baffling the coaches with his scope of knowledge.

    Cromartie says he watches film for about 12 extra hours per week after he leaves the facility, and he also spends about three hours breaking down the opposing receivers with Revis.


    Revis’ unfailing ability to shut down one side of the field gives tremendous flexibility to the Jets defense. When Cromartie is playing well, too, “the entire call sheet is open,” Pettine said. Cromartie’s uptick has coincided with the Jets’ three-game winning streak.

    Even when the Jets were pursuing Asomugha, they stayed in contact with Cromartie. Thurman texted or called him daily. Tannenbaum spoke to him at the beginning of the Asomugha chase, telling Cromartie, “I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t look around the market. And you’ve earned the right to be a free agent.”

    If the Jets had to have Asomugha, they would have upped their initial offer, but they never did. They saw the talent of a No. 1 cornerback in Cromartie, and now they are starting to see a No. 1 cornerback emerge.

    “It’s like he’s coming out of his cocoon, which is kind of scary,” Thurman said. “Because if he continues to work at his game, and he continues to want to improve as a corner, then with his athletic ability and his physical talent, really the sky is the limit. It is up to him.”

    [URL]http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/12/jets_antonio_cromartie_finally.html[/URL]
    Last edited by C Mart; 03-03-2012 at 09:36 PM.

  6. #66
    [QUOTE=C Mart;4383288]Do you even watch the games? Cro had a damn good 2nd half..Cro acknowledged after the 2nd Pats game he needed to work paraphrasing work harder and become more of a student of the game..He can't get by on his talent alone[/QUOTE]

    CMart and Ray Ray,

    Please go read what Schroy wrote in another thread about wasting picks in this upcoming draft and next year on QBs. LMAO.

  7. #67
    [QUOTE=Kentucky Jet;4383066]Thomas DeCoud, The Type We Need!
    by David_Wyatt on Mar 3, 2012 2:40 PM EST

    I've heard a lot of talk over the past few months about this free agent safety class, the pining for a Michael Griffin or Laron Landry but apart from one person on twitter, nobody has mentioned Atlanta Falcons free agent safety Thomas DeCoud. I have absolutely no idea why, he ticks all the boxes. He is young (26), a free agent, a player coming off a productive season (86 tackles, 4 interceptions, 6 passes defended) won't command a ton of money and is a three year starter.

    Oh did I mention that he specialises in being a cover safety, that's his forte. He's known as more of a centre fielder. As a 3 year starter he has 8 interceptions and four forced fumbles. He is not a polished article of course, he can be known to go for a big hit instead of wrapping up, he can take some bad angles to the football and he drops some interceptions that he should be bringing in. However he doesn't do any of the bad things as much as he covers opposing players getting into positions to make a play on the football.

    I think the bottom line is that Thomas DeCoud has been improving every year with the Falcons, to a point where he had a better year in 2011 than Michael Griffin. We have safeties who can come up and play in the box and stop the run, we desperately need a safety who can make some plays on the ball in safety. A physical guy who has good size (6-2, 195lb's) who has upside.

    I remember DeCoud coming out of California in 2008, he was known as a developmental player who would only improve with reps. A cover guy first and foremost who could cover tight ends and running backs coming out in the flat. He will miss some tackles because he wants to put you down and will always go for that knockout blow but if he keeps improving in the manner he has he can be a real asset in 2012 and beyond, especially for a team that needs a cover safety.

    Michael Griffin gets the attention as a former first round guy and a name, and don't get me wrong I wouldn't say no to bringing him in. Laron Landry is a good football player, but better in the box than out in coverage, and again as a former first round pick and a name he is getting a lot of attention. Atlanta just tagged Grimes so DeCoud will hit free agency. I would love to bring him in.[/QUOTE]
    Excellent post and DeCoud seems like a solid option (maybe a FA priority), I think Reggie Nelson and maybe Donte Whitner could also help the Jets in FA but I think the draft is Barron or a project that will take a few years to develop - next year is one more year without Supe

  8. #68
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    Guys we also have to remember that TRACY WILSON can turn out to be a pretty good safety for us. We got him last year right after the supplemental draft. Some have stated that he would have been a second round pick in this upcoming draft if he stayed in school.

    I hope to see him De Coud and Barron roaming the middle of our secondary for years to come making monster hits and interceptions! Our passrush must be upgraded and if it is it will greatly assist the secondary and we will be on our way!

  9. #69
    [QUOTE=Kentucky Jet;4383066]Thomas DeCoud, The Type We Need!
    by David_Wyatt on Mar 3, 2012 2:40 PM EST

    I've heard a lot of talk over the past few months about this free agent safety class, the pining for a Michael Griffin or Laron Landry but apart from one person on twitter, nobody has mentioned Atlanta Falcons free agent safety Thomas DeCoud. I have absolutely no idea why, he ticks all the boxes. He is young (26), a free agent, a player coming off a productive season (86 tackles, 4 interceptions, 6 passes defended) won't command a ton of money and is a three year starter.

    Oh did I mention that he specialises in being a cover safety, that's his forte. He's known as more of a centre fielder. As a 3 year starter he has 8 interceptions and four forced fumbles. He is not a polished article of course, he can be known to go for a big hit instead of wrapping up, he can take some bad angles to the football and he drops some interceptions that he should be bringing in. However he doesn't do any of the bad things as much as he covers opposing players getting into positions to make a play on the football.

    I think the bottom line is that Thomas DeCoud has been improving every year with the Falcons, to a point where he had a better year in 2011 than Michael Griffin. We have safeties who can come up and play in the box and stop the run, we desperately need a safety who can make some plays on the ball in safety. A physical guy who has good size (6-2, 195lb's) who has upside.

    I remember DeCoud coming out of California in 2008, he was known as a developmental player who would only improve with reps. A cover guy first and foremost who could cover tight ends and running backs coming out in the flat. He will miss some tackles because he wants to put you down and will always go for that knockout blow but if he keeps improving in the manner he has he can be a real asset in 2012 and beyond, especially for a team that needs a cover safety.

    Michael Griffin gets the attention as a former first round guy and a name, and don't get me wrong I wouldn't say no to bringing him in. Laron Landry is a good football player, but better in the box than out in coverage, and again as a former first round pick and a name he is getting a lot of attention. Atlanta just tagged Grimes so DeCoud will hit free agency. I would love to bring him in.[/QUOTE]

    KJ,

    Excellent scouting job!!!

  10. #70
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    [QUOTE=BRONX JET;4382861]When you can get in the QBs face consistently It don't matter who is playing safety. Giants had a slow linebacker covering GronK. Draft passrushers in the first two rounds and I'll play safety[/QUOTE]

    maybe but fortunately for NYG Gronk was injured.
    we will need to cover him next year also

  11. #71
    [QUOTE=Kentucky Jet;4383296]Guys we also have to remember that TRACY WILSON can turn out to be a pretty good safety for us. We got him last year right after the supplemental draft. Some have stated that he would have been a second round pick in this upcoming draft if he stayed in school.

    I hope to see him De Coud and Barron roaming the middle of our secondary for years to come making monster hits and interceptions! Our passrush must be upgraded and if it is it will greatly assist the secondary and we will be on our way![/QUOTE]

    Nice job KJ I had no clue who this Guy was.

  12. #72
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    [QUOTE=Ray Ray19;4383279]Oh dear lord, please stop posting...[/QUOTE]

    Every village needs it's idiot.

    _

  13. #73
    AdamSchefter

    [B]The Tennessee Titans are likely to use their franchise tag on safety Michael Griffin.[/B]

  14. #74
    [QUOTE=C Mart;4383288]Do you even watch the games? Cro had a damn good 2nd half..Cro acknowledged after the 2nd Pats game he needed to work paraphrasing work harder and become more of a student of the game..He can't get by on his talent alone




    [B]Published: Saturday, December 17, 2011, 11:45 PM[/B]

    Dennis Thurman had anticipated this moment for 21 months, ever since the [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/"]Jets[/URL] traded for cornerback Antonio Cromartie in March of last year. It finally happened last week, on the practice field during team drills.

    “For 5 years, I did it on physical talent,” Cromartie admitted to Thurman. “I see why I need to do more.”

    The Jets’ defensive backs coach, and defensive coordinator Mike Pettine, and head coach Rex Ryan, had been waiting for their perhaps most physically gifted player to evolve from mercurial to consistent.

    They reinforced the techniques that have made counterpart Darrelle Revis the best in the league, namely using his hands aggressively at the line of scrimmage, and relying on his eyes and quick feet down the field.

    They weathered Cromartie’s maddening peaks and valleys early this season: two touchdowns surrendered on opening night, two interceptions the next week, then four penalties the game after that.

    But the past few weeks, the coaching staff’s patience has seemed to pay off. Now playing for the Jets, they say, is the best Antonio Cromartie they have seen — just in time for their playoff push, continuing this afternoon in Philadelphia against the Eagles.

    “He decided that he was going to be a great player, and I think that’s what it is, because he’s got as much God-given ability as any corner I’ve ever been around,” Ryan said. “When he’s playing at a high level, our defense plays at a high level.”
    • • •
    Cromartie, of course, was the other party in this summer’s high-stakes [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/07/nnamdi_asomugha_goes_to_philad.html"]bidding war for Nnamdi Asomugha.[/URL] The 27-year-old waited at his home in California — “sitting back and relaxing” — while Asomugha largely froze the free-agent market for cornerbacks, keeping the Jets and other suitors on ice as he weighed his options.

    Asomugha will be on the opposite sideline with the Eagles today. About 48 hours after the former Raiders star turned down the Jets for a more lucrative offer in Philadelphia, Jets general manager Mike Tannenbaum closed in on a four-year, $32 million deal with Cromartie.

    The Jets knew Cromartie had been prone to inconsistent play during his first season with the team in 2010. They also knew about his wealth of physical gifts that cannot be taught, including 6-2 size, 4.4 speed and 6-7 wingspan. They were confident their coaching could bridge the gap.

    “It’s almost like the light is coming on for him,” Thurman explained. “Because there was, for whatever reason, a little hesitation in terms of some of the things that we really emphasized to him. It took him awhile.”

    Thurman likened Cromartie to a 44 percent basketball shooter who is told by a coach that if he changes his technique slightly, he could make 51 percent of his shots. A 30 percent shooter would jump at the chance. But a 44 percent shooter may be reluctant, because he is already having success.

    So Thurman was patient while Cromartie, now in his sixth NFL season, tentatively absorbed the technical minutiae that separate good cornerbacks from great ones. During the offseason, the coaches produced a cut-ups reel to prove to Cromartie the difference when he knocks receivers off the line of scrimmage vs. when he does not.

    That reinforcement carried over into practice this fall. Thurman avoided brow-beating but used the practice tape as proof, calmly pointing out, “Cro, see what happened?” Thurman often reminded him to “keep your eyes on your work,” meaning that he must make sure he is in position with the receiver to make a play before looking for the ball.

    Midway through this season, Cromartie’s coaches and teammates noticed a change. Pettine said it started after the bye week. Thurman pinned it more recently, after the home New England loss in Week 10.

    The Jets’ secondary was “exposed” in that game by Tom Brady and Co., Thurman admitted. The defense allowed 329 passing yards and three touchdown catches, often appearing out of position or overmatched.

    The game film was humbling across the board. Cromartie watched himself look silly on a 12-yard catch by Chad Ochocinco on the Patriots’ first drive. He turned back for the ball at least three seconds too soon, ending up more than 10 yards downfield when Ochocinco hauled in the pass.


    Thurman issued a challenge to his defensive backs after that game: This is what happens when you are inconsistent. Are you going to be as good as you think you can be? The focus of the group changed, he said, and Cromartie was at the front of the line.

    “There are doubters every day,” Cromartie said. “My job is to prove doubters wrong, and try to help this team and this organization get to the big game, and that’s the Super Bowl.”
    • • • 
    Cromartie has acknowledged his early ups and downs and, looking back, he attributes them to a quest for perfection. When he made a mistake, he did not always have the short memory his position requires. He worked on thinking less, while also vowing to use his practice time to commit the techniques preached by Thurman to muscle memory. Ryan has a saying: “Master your habits, or your habits will master you.”

    The only touchdown Cromartie has given up since the second New England loss came off a fluky deflection that landed in the hands of former teammate Brad Smith, now with the Bills. Through the first six games, Cromartie had surrendered all three of the opponents’ passing touchdowns.


    He has allowed completions on just 37.5 percent of passes directed his way in the past four games, below his season average, according to the football statistics website Pro Football Focus.

    For the season, he has the league’s fifth-best burn percentage (42.5) among cornerbacks who have been targeted at least 60 times, according to Statspass. Revis ranks third.

    Last week’s victory against Kansas City was the most consistent 60 minutes Thurman has seen Cromartie play. On a fade route to Jonathan Baldwin in the second half, Cromartie was the aggressor at the line of scrimmage, disrupting the timing of the route so the throw was off.

    Thurman was also proud of a third-down stop on which Cromartie smartly bailed on press coverage to back up and protect against a deep throw, tackling the receiver short of the first-down marker.

    “He’s responded, I think, to the situation,” Pettine said. “He’s been challenged by me, by Dennis Thurman, by Rex. He’s a prideful guy, and he wants to succeed.”

    Those challenges have been in private and public, notably [URL="http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/10/jets_account_for_antonio_croma.html"]Pettine’s comments about Cromartie’s vexing inconsistency[/URL] at a press conference before the San Diego Chargers game in Week 7.

    Pettine said he was at a loss for the reason behind Cromartie’s unpredictable play, deadpanning that perhaps it’s “a horoscope thing.” He also revealed that he calls down to Thurman on game day over the headset, asking whether the Jets had “good Cro” or “bad Cro” that day, and would adjust his defensive calls accordingly.

    Cromartie heard. He and Pettine had an informal conversation. Pettine told his player that his words came out differently in print than he had intended — though looking back, maybe his candor was a good thing.

    The last time he’s had to adjust for “bad Cro?” “I haven’t had one in a while,” Pettine said. Thurman added more definitively: “It doesn’t happen.”

    Instead, the Jets now see a player brimming with confidence. On the practice field, Cromartie will shout out two or three possible plays as soon as the scout team lines up in a formation, baffling the coaches with his scope of knowledge.

    Cromartie says he watches film for about 12 extra hours per week after he leaves the facility, and he also spends about three hours breaking down the opposing receivers with Revis.


    Revis’ unfailing ability to shut down one side of the field gives tremendous flexibility to the Jets defense. When Cromartie is playing well, too, “the entire call sheet is open,” Pettine said. Cromartie’s uptick has coincided with the Jets’ three-game winning streak.

    Even when the Jets were pursuing Asomugha, they stayed in contact with Cromartie. Thurman texted or called him daily. Tannenbaum spoke to him at the beginning of the Asomugha chase, telling Cromartie, “I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t look around the market. And you’ve earned the right to be a free agent.”

    If the Jets had to have Asomugha, they would have upped their initial offer, but they never did. They saw the talent of a No. 1 cornerback in Cromartie, and now they are starting to see a No. 1 cornerback emerge.

    “It’s like he’s coming out of his cocoon, which is kind of scary,” Thurman said. “Because if he continues to work at his game, and he continues to want to improve as a corner, then with his athletic ability and his physical talent, really the sky is the limit. It is up to him.”

    [URL]http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2011/12/jets_antonio_cromartie_finally.html[/URL][/QUOTE]
    Thanks for posting this and sorting out the trolls

  15. #75
    draft markelle martin in rd 2, harrison smith in rd 3

    Barron - I'd rather go OL in rd 1 with Glenn or Adams, not good enough in coverage to merit the #16 pick.

    Landry - BIG TIME PASS (has a bad achilles, will finish next season on IR just like previous 2 years)

  16. #76
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    [QUOTE=C Mart;4383192]According to Tony Pauline Ileoka had a bad workout at the combine. Mayock labeled this draft class as brutal for S but still rates Barron with a 1st round grade. He also liked Harrison smith.[/QUOTE]

    I'm not real concerned about a guy's combine workout. I watch them, like anyone else.... it's just nice to watch anything NFL related..... but a good workout doesn't tell the story of a player (see V. Gholston). I'd rather believe what my eyes tell me--- and I see two guys that are a little raw, have great size, cover well, take some chances.... but, most importantly, in my opinion, they make plays on the ball, that remind me of Ed Reed. I think either of them could be turned into difference makers, under Ryan, Pettine and Thurman.

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