Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 53

Thread: Tim Tebow, Steve Young and scrapping the Wildcat Offense.

  1. #1

    Tim Tebow, Steve Young and scrapping the Wildcat Offense.

    This is going to be a very different view from 99 percent of the opinions out there, but I think its worth the time as this entire board is the same post over and over again.

    The Jets were clearly concerned about Mark Sanchez this offseason. And I think they really could have overreacted by going after a Flynn, drafting a guy high, or really getting into the Manning Sweepstakes. I think they actually may have handled this perfectly depended on how they use Tebow.

    Heres a decent read from Dennis Oddonnell that i really couldn't say any better.

    [QUOTE]SAN FRANCISCO (CBS 5) – New York Jets fans were stunned at the trade that brought Tim Tebow to the Big Apple. What’s the point when you just extended Mark Sanchez? On the surface, they’re right. It’s a quarterback controversy waiting to happen. The whole thing could blow up in the face of Jets management.

    Then again, who knows?

    By 1987 the San Francisco 49ers were cementing their legacy as the team of the eighties. Joe Montana had already won two Super Bowls and probably could have stamped his ticket to Canton by then.

    Then came a move that, at the time, seemed innocent enough. Bill Walsh, in perhaps his greatest deal ever, sent 2nd and 4th round draft picks to Tampa Bay in exchange for Steve Young. Young was known more for the record contract he signed with the USFL’s Los Angeles Express than he was for his NFL accomplishments. [B][SIZE="5"]As an NFL starter in Tampa, Young was 3-16. In 19 games, he threw 11 touchdowns, 21 interceptions and was, quite frankly, a better runner than a thrower.[/SIZE][/B] He was considered a bust by the Bucs, and they considered themselves fortunate to receive two good picks in exchange for a quarterback that never reached his potential. Niner fans will tell you that, early on, his feet in the pocket moved faster than Fred Astaire’s.

    Joe Montana never helped Steve Young become a great quarterback. Young’s lessons were learned from watching Montana, not breaking down the nuances of the game. It was an icy relationship from the start, but everyone benefitted from it. Walsh notched another “genius” button on his jacket. Montana, as Walsh later said, was a better player because of the shadow, Young’s game flourished under Walsh’s tutoring, Jerry Rice set records, and the 49ers remained one of the league’s elite teams throughout the nineties.

    The point is not to compare Mark Sanchez to Joe Montana, or Steve Young to Tim Tebow. I’m comparing the idea of trading for another quarterback when the present is already in place. Tebow’s role may be exclusively as a running quarterback in certain situations. But don’t discount the potential evolution of a quarterback’s athletic abilities.

    Bill Walsh didn’t.[/QUOTE]

    Obviously Tim Tebow has been compared to Steve Young since Highschool, and what most younger NFL fans dont realize is how poorly Steve Young did upon entering the league. Here is Steve Youngs progression as he aged.
    1961

    1985/1986- His first two years in the league were in Tampa as mentioned earlier. Record as a Starter was 3-16. 11 TD/21 Int. Completion Percentage was 52%. Steve Young did rush for over 650 yards those two years. His second year in the league(1986) Steve was 25 years old.

    -Quick Comparison. Tim Tebow record as a Starter was 8-6 with a completion percentage of 47%. 17 TD/9 int. Tim rushed for 887 yards those two years. Tim's second year in the league he was 24 years old. Among Tim's highlights as we all know is several come from behind wins, Last Drive of the game wins and his playoff game stats of 350 all purpose yards, 3 TD's, and NO turnovers against 2011 Best defense in Pittsburgh (YPG, and Passing YPG, and Scoring). Yes, the number 1 defense in the league. Quick Note--The broncos record when Tebow did not start at QB these 2 years was 4-14, and Denver was among the worst teams in the league in 2010.


    -Through years 1-2 in the league Steve Young was not as good of a Passer, or runner as Tim Tebow. He had no where near the success although being one year older then TT(Tebow). This does not in anyway mean that Tebow will even come close to Youngs HOF career. But I can tell you in 1987 no one in the world thought Steve Young would succeed either when he was traded to SF while Montana was there.

    -For the Next 4 years Young stayed on the sideline getting sporadic play---and spent the majority of the time improving, and working on his game with Bill Walsh. [B]He flashed on and off, but the whole time Montana was the Man. Steve Young was not an NFL starter again until his age 30 season. [/B] From there it was all history as he became super accurate, learned the offense(which was the same year after year bc of Montana), still ran the ball, won SuperBowls and MVP's on his way to a HOF career.

    -A quick note before I go back to TT(Tim Tebow). Does the above situation remind you of anyone else? It totally reminds me of Aaron Rodgers and Brett Favre. Rodgers would not be the player he is today without that Bench time. Heres a quick article on Aaron Rodgers who spent 3 years on the bench altering his throwing mechanics, and game in general.

    [QUOTE]Green Bay - As the finished product, Aaron Rodgers has played quarterback better than anyone else in the National Football League for the last year and a half.

    Those who have watched Rodgers on a regular basis simply have grown accustomed to a standard of excellence that is at the forefront of the Green Bay Packers' drive to a second straight championship.


    For Rodgers to be in this place, on the cusp of becoming the NFL's most valuable player, when it is remembered where he was earlier in his career is almost unfathomable.


    If someone had asked after his first season whether Rodgers had a better chance to be a star or a bust, I might have answered bust. Many personnel people probably would have, too.

    As a rookie, Rodgers' six substantial outings included a scrimmage against Buffalo, four exhibition games and the fourth quarter of a December night game in Baltimore.

    He was brutal every time out.

    In each of the exhibition games, Brett Favre started before turning it over to Rodgers. Until his 20th and final series, when the Packers scored a touchdown in Tennessee with the aid of a 33-yard penalty for pass interference, Rodgers had not generated a point. Sixteen possessions ended with punts, two on interceptions and one on a fumble.

    If the No. 2 quarterback job had been awarded based on performance in training camp and games, it would have gone to Craig Nall hands-down.

    Against the Ravens, Rodgers threw an interception, fumbled twice and was sacked three times.

    As the 2006 draft drew near, Rodgers told NFL Network that he had heard the rumors of the Packers possibly selecting a quarterback with the No. 5 selection in a move that would likely end his career in Green Bay. Ted Thompson, the general manager who had drafted Rodgers with the No. 24 pick the year before, didn't rule it out.

    A month before the draft, a panel of 18 personnel men were asked to compare Rodgers against that year's quarterback pool led by Matt Leinart, Vince Young and Jay Cutler. Not only didn't Rodgers draw any first-place votes, he had only one second and three thirds. Eleven scouts put him fourth, and three others even had him behind Brodie Croyle and Charlie Whitehurst.

    This was serious business. Favre was talking retirement yet again, and Thompson's No. 1 charge was to find a suitable replacement. Thompson even said Young could become the NFL's version of Michael Jordan.

    Young went No. 3 to the Titans before the Packers passed on Leinart and Cutler to take A.J. Hawk. Working against drafting a quarterback was the grim reality that the Packers probably would have been looking at a fourth- or fifth-round pick for Rodgers.

    The coaching change from Mike Sherman to Mike McCarthy could have been the kiss of death for Rodgers. McCarthy preferred Alex Smith to Rodgers before the 2005 draft.

    Rodgers participated fully in the quarterback school led by position coach Tom Clements. Still, he was inconsistent in the off-season and only slightly improved in his second training camp.

    There was considerable optimism after Rodgers turned in his best performance up to then in the exhibition opener against San Diego. But he was very average in the second game, not very good in the third and awful in the fourth.

    In his only meaningful regular-season appearance, Rodgers played the entire second half against New England. Once again, he played poorly, holding the ball for three sacks and missing several open receivers.

    Making matters even worse, Rodgers suffered a broken fifth metatarsal bone in his left foot at some point in the Patriots game, underwent surgery and missed the last six weeks.

    "You don't want to be critical of the kid because he's in a new system," an AFC personnel director said at the time. "But it looks like it will be awhile, if ever, if he develops."

    Last week, that same scout said, "After his second preseason, if they had released him, I don't know that anybody would have been shocked. I mean, he wasn't a very good player. He couldn't make a play."

    Once again, Thompson said he wouldn't rule out drafting a quarterback. In April 2007, 12 of 18 scouts said Brady Quinn was a better prospect than Rodgers.

    On the eve of Rodgers' third training camp, three months after passing on a quarterback, Thompson renewed his public support of Rodgers by saying, "We think whenever it does become his time, Aaron will be a good player."

    In those first two seasons, Rodgers had been much more of a by-the-book quarterback.

    He had been taught at California by coach Jeff Tedford to carry the ball high near his ear, on the so-called "shelf." Rodgers insisted that it quickened his release and sharpened his accuracy, but it also limited his ability to vary his release point against pressure and probably prevented him from really driving the ball downfield.

    McCarthy has said the Packers worked with Rodgers to carry the ball lower to enhance his natural throwing motion, and by about his third year his ball positioning no longer was an issue.

    But don't blame Tedford for those first two seasons. It was Rodgers doing the playing.

    According to many personnel people, Rodgers didn't have much feel in the pocket. Either he would bolt prematurely or he would hold the ball too long. His timing was off, his running was rather ineffective and his accuracy was disappointing, too.

    He also kept fumbling the ball, seven times (four lost) in his first three exhibition seasons.

    Rodgers was just 21, three years removed from his high school graduation, when his pro career began. He came across as overly self-assured and a little too slick. Even though Favre had been excused by Sherman, Rodgers tried to be funny by calling the three-time MVP "lazy" for not attending a minicamp in May 2005.

    Far worse were the numerous cases in which Rodgers seemed to show up teammates by gesturing toward them after bad plays as if he were never the one at fault.

    The Cal media guide in 2004 listed Rodgers at 6 feet 2 inches and 200 pounds. He measured exactly 6-2 at the combine six months later, but although he scaled 223 pounds some teams didn't consider it good weight.

    Rodgers ran a fast 40-yard dash at the combine (4.73 seconds), but few teams thought him to be a top athlete and many expected his durability issues would only intensify in the NFL.

    Hall of Fame coach Bill Walsh, in an October 2005 interview, said Rodgers might have maxed out physically.

    "That's right," said Walsh. "What you see is what you get. He doesn't have great more potential that he doesn't show. He's part of a system and a real outstanding coach in college and all that. But I don't know where it's going to take him."

    During his recovery from foot surgery, Rodgers went home to California not only an injured man but also a humbled man. In August, he told NBC's Phil Simms that "I think I had doubts whether I had what it took to be a successful starter."

    At the same time, Rodgers decided that he would just try to play more naturally when he returned for his third season.

    "I have been humbled through not playing and through my poor play my first year," Rodgers told me in August 2007. "I came out as a 21-year-old kid still wet behind the ears thinking I had all the answers. I feel like my body language in general, practice included, has really improved."

    He cut weight and body fat while adding bulk strength to better absorb hits. He threw tighter spirals. He made fewer impulsive mistakes. He stayed in the pocket longer. He stopped blaming others, quit being so defensive and let teammates see the positive side of him.

    The results were remarkable. At Pittsburgh in the exhibition opener, Rodgers led drives of 75, 71 and 57 yards. His confidence grew. Across the league, evaluators saw a major difference.

    When Favre was horrible in a November 2007 showdown in Dallas, Rodgers entered with a 27-10 deficit and rallied the Packers in a career-altering performance. Cowboys linebacker Bradie James said: "To me, Aaron Rodgers played way better than Brett Favre."

    By year's end, Thompson and McCarthy were sold on Rodgers. When Favre retired in the spring of 2008, Rodgers ran with the mantle of leadership. When Favre tried to get the job back, the team's brass told him no.

    Today, Rodgers' arm strength is superior to what it was. That didn't just happen. He worked with experts on the biomechanics of throwing while working to strengthen the small muscles of the shoulder.

    Tutored wonderfully by Clements and McCarthy, he drilled and drilled until his out-of-pocket game became extraordinary and his progressions perhaps beyond compare.

    Ever mindful of turnovers, he trimmed his interception and fumble totals to the barest of minimums.

    One of his few remaining flaws - holding the ball too long - at last went into remission a year ago, disappointing opponents to no end. "That used to be our thing. . . we knew we could sack him," a personnel man for an NFC North team said. "Now he doesn't get sacked much anymore."

    Through it all, he never lost the drive to succeed or the chip on his shoulder.

    It also took time for Rich Gannon and Kurt Warner, who are similar to Rodgers in terms of stature and intelligence, to blossom into NFL MVPs.

    The changing complexion of high school and college football makes quarterbacks in general more NFL-ready, but there will always be a place for someone with the mental and physical toughness to overcome failure and flourish later.

    Aaron Rodgers certainly fits that profile.[/QUOTE]

    Long read, I know. Sorry but its a good one. As you can see, a QB can alter his throwing mechanics and strengthen his game on the bench. Staying in one system certainly helped rodgers, and young IMO.

    Lets take away all the garbage sports talk radio stuff about Tebows religion, cult following, ticket sales, etc and just talk football here. Tim is a flawed player and he certainly needs work. But if you dont see the potential, and the It factor he has you are blind. He has the IT factor that we all hope and search for in Sanchez(that he still may have).

    -IMO Tim Tebow is a guy that
    -Should be our clear backup, and focus on imrpoving his mechanics/game.
    -should not be running a separate offense then Mark Sanchez.
    -should be learning our Pro offense.
    -Should not move away from QB long Term.
    -Needs time on the Bench to be a Franchise QB.

    I had thoughts about him being a Hback earlier, but we can draft those late every year. We have Tebow at a cheap salary, got him for a late pick, and hes Young(24). Mark Sanchez needs to stay the man for the next year with a Long Leash, and we need to scrap this whole idea of running a gimmick offense like the Wildcat. Sure get TT on the field at times, but we need to stay away from the gimmick/trickery and position changes for him longterm. If you try to make a Gimmick offense and play Tebow at QB/diff positions your going to ruin this guys chances at succeeding totally. Its hard enough to be good at one NFL position.

    In the words of Steve Young from a few months ago[QUOTE]After Tebow's press conference, Young revealed that he worked with Tebow a couple months ago and thinks Tebow's struggles as a quarterback can be fixed. "He's got to stay laser focused on playing the quarterback position," Young added, "or he'll be pigeon-holed into something else. It's important for him to (say) I want to run a conventional offense and prove I can do it."[/QUOTE]

    Theres a chance the Tebow trade could be brilliant. His cap hits are very reasonable, and with Mark here he does not need to come in and start. The vast majority of you will not agree, but if we actually develop this guy his upside in the NFL is endless. Lets hope the Jets handle this right.....

    Btw Tebows cap hits
    [QUOTE]Here’s the breakdown:

    2012:

    Base Salary – $1.1 million
    Roster Bonus- $472,000
    Advance Repayment – $1.5 million
    Cap Hit – $3.072 million

    2013:

    Base Salary – $1.055 million
    Advance Repayment – $1.03 million
    Cap Hit – $2.085 million

    2014:

    Base Salary – $895,000
    Cap Hit – $895,000
    [/QUOTE]
    Last edited by KR; 03-27-2012 at 03:51 AM.

  2. #2
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In transit
    Posts
    6,192
    [QUOTE=KR;4418627]This is going to be a very different view from 99 percent of the opinions out there, but I think its worth the time as this entire board is the same post over and over again.

    The Jets were clearly concerned about Mark Sanchez this offseason. And I think they really could have overreacted by going after a Flynn, drafting a guy high, or really getting into the Manning Sweepstakes. I think they actually may have handled this perfectly depended on how they use Tebow.

    Heres a decent read from Dennis Oddonnell that i really couldn't say any better.



    Obviously Tim Tebow has been compared to Steve Young since Highschool, and what most younger NFL fans dont realize is how poorly Steve Young did upon entering the league. Here is Steve Youngs progression as he aged.
    1961

    1985/1986- His first two years in the league were in Tampa as mentioned earlier. Record as a Starter was 3-16. 11 TD/21 Int. Completion Percentage was 52%. Steve Young did rush for over 650 yards those two years. His second year in the league(1986) Steve was 25 years old.

    -Quick Comparison. Tim Tebow record as a Starter was 8-6 with a completion percentage of 47%. 17 TD/9 int. Tim rushed for 887 yards those two years. Tim's second year in the league he was 24 years old. Among Tim's highlights as we all know is several come from behind wins, Last Drive of the game wins and his playoff game stats of 350 all purpose yards, 3 TD's, and NO turnovers against 2011 Best defense in Pittsburgh (YPG, and Passing YPG, and Scoring). Yes, the number 1 defense in the league. Quick Note--The broncos record when Tebow did not start at QB these 2 years was 4-14, and Denver was among the worst teams in the league in 2010.


    -Through years 1-2 in the league Steve Young was not as good of a Passer, or runner as Tim Tebow. He had no where near the success although being one year older then TT(Tebow). This does not in anyway mean that Tebow will even come close to Youngs HOF career. But I can tell you in 1987 no one in the world thought Steve Young would succeed either when he was traded to SF while Montana was there.

    -For the Next 4 years Young stayed on the sideline getting sporadic play---and spent the majority of the time improving, and working on his game with Bill Walsh. [B]He flashed on and off, but the whole time Montana was the Man. Steve Young was not an NFL starter again until his age 30 season. [/B] From there it was all history as he became super accurate, learned the offense(which was the same year after year bc of Montana), still ran the ball, won SuperBowls and MVP's on his way to a HOF career.

    -A quick note before I go back to TT(Tim Tebow). Does the above situation remind you of anyone else? It totally reminds me of Aaron Rodgers and Brett Favre. Rodgers would not be the player he is today without that Bench time. Heres a quick article on Aaron Rodgers who spent 3 years on the bench altering his throwing mechanics, and game in general.



    Long read, I know. Sorry but its a good one. As you can see, a QB can alter his throwing mechanics and strengthen his game on the bench. Staying in one system certainly helped rodgers, and young IMO.

    Lets take away all the garbage sports talk radio stuff about Tebows religion, cult following, ticket sales, etc and just talk football here. Tim is a flawed player and he certainly needs work. But if you dont see the potential, and the It factor he has you are blind. He has the IT factor that we all hope and search for in Sanchez(that he still may have).

    -IMO Tim Tebow is a guy that
    -Should be our clear backup, and focus on imrpoving his mechanics/game.
    -should not be running a separate offense then Mark Sanchez.
    -should be learning our Pro offense.
    -Should not move away from QB long Term.
    -Needs time on the Bench to be a Franchise QB.

    I had thoughts about him being a Hback earlier, but we can draft those late every year. We have Tebow at a cheap salary, got him for a late pick, and hes Young(24). Mark Sanchez needs to stay the man for the next year with a Long Leash, and we need to scrap this whole idea of running a gimmick offense like the Wildcat. Sure get TT on the field at times, but we need to stay away from the gimmick/trickery and position changes for him longterm. If you try to make a Gimmick offense and play Tebow at QB/diff positions your going to ruin this guys chances at succeeding totally. Its hard enough to be good at one NFL position.

    In the words of Steve Young from a few months ago

    Theres a chance the Tebow trade could be brilliant. His cap hits are very reasonable, and with Mark here he does not need to come in and start. The vast majority of you will not agree, but if we actually develop this guy his upside in the NFL is endless. Lets hope the Jets handle this right.....

    Btw Tebows cap hits[/QUOTE]

    Great article.

    His cap hit goes up alot due to playing time incentives in his rookie contract, i believe cloer to 6 million next year. People forget that for years it was very common for QB's to sit for a year or 2 to learn. Most of us (me included) thought Sanchez should not even play his rookie year. Tebow is in the same boat, if some one had drafted him in the 2nd or 3rd, and let him develope longer....

  3. #3
    [QUOTE=chirorob;4418629]Great article.

    His cap hit goes up alot due to playing time incentives in his rookie contract, i believe cloer to 6 million next year. People forget that for years it was very common for QB's to sit for a year or 2 to learn. Most of us (me included) thought Sanchez should not even play his rookie year. Tebow is in the same boat, if some one had drafted him in the 2nd or 3rd, and let him develope longer....[/QUOTE]

    Thanks Chiro, Here is TTs cap hits for the next few years. If he stays on the bench and only plays 10-20 plays per game his cap hits are very cheap and managable.

    [QUOTE]Tim Tebow’s Contract Details

    by Dennis Agapito on March 25, 2012

    in Jet News
    Post image for Tim Tebow’s Contract Details

    There has been lots of confusion about Tim Tebow’s contract and exactly what he is going to cost. The following is an analysis of his contract: please note that this is pieced together as best as possible using available resources. Hopefully over the next few days more specific contract details will be announced but this should give an overview of what he will cost.

    Tebow originally signed a five year $33 million contract in 2010 and while it sounds like a lot most of the money is incentive driven based upon playing time and performance. One obtainable incentive increases Tebow’s contract by $11.25 million.

    He needs to play at least 55% of the snaps in 2012 or 70% of the snaps in 2013 to potentially reach this increase. The incentive requires more than just achieving a playing time trigger. Tebow will also have to be top five in quarterback ranking and receive league honors to earn the incentive, but it is possible.

    Tebow was given a $6.275 million salary advance in August of 2011. This advance changed Tebow’s base salary to the following:

    2012 – $540,000
    2013 – $630,000
    2014 – $730,000

    Since the advance consisted of a $1.2 million decrease in 2011 a little over $5 million was left to be accounted for and it was this money that held up the trade. Denver wanted the Jets to repay them for the entire remaining salary advance. The Jets and Denver settled on splitting the difference $2.53 million. This repayment will be included in the Jets salary cap $1.5 million in 2012 and $1.03 million in 2013.

    Tebow unlocked some 2012-14 escalators and incentive in his contract with his 2011 performance, which the Jets will be responsible for. 2012 escalator of $310,000 and a playoff bonus of $250,000 increases by $560,000 Tebow’s base salary. He also triggered a 2012 roster bonus $472,500 due in the start of training camp. Escalators in 2013 of $425,000 and 2014 of $165,000 increase his salary as well.

    Here’s the breakdown:

    2012:

    Base Salary – $1.1 million
    Roster Bonus- $472,000
    Advance Repayment – $1.5 million
    Cap Hit – $3.072 million

    2013:

    Base Salary – $1.055 million
    Advance Repayment – $1.03 million
    Cap Hit – $2.085 million

    2014:

    Base Salary – $895,000
    Cap Hit – $895,000

    Currently Tebow has 3 years at $6 million that the Jets are responsible for but this number could increase given playing time and performance.

    The acquisition of Tebow has lead to the trade of backup QB Drew Stanton which has freed up $750,000 in salary space. This move does carry a dead money hit of $500,000 which represents Stanton’s signing bonus.[/QUOTE]

  4. #4
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In transit
    Posts
    6,192
    That's actually not bad money at all for a backup quarterback.

    (Can you tell I can't sleep tonight?)

  5. #5
    The Bill Walsh 49'ers and the Packers had two of the best QB development environments in NFL history. And these places had lots of other talent to surround the QB. If Steve Young had gone to Cincinnati he likely would have been a bust.

    Tebow might have had the career trajectory of a Young had he stayed in Denver. Learning beside Manning for 3 years would have been an invaluable experience. But Elway wanted no part of him.

    Can Tebow have meteoric improvement on the Jets ? Tebow will work hard, that's for sure. But there's no savvy vet to learn from since Sanchez is himself a young player. There's no QB gurus like Bill Walsh here. Ryan is a defensive minded head coach. The OC Sparano wants to run the ball all the time. And finally the Jets have nowhere near the level of talent like the 49'ers dynasties: Roger Craig, Jerry Rice, etc. Add in the media fishbowl experience in NY and I think Tebow is not very likely to turn into a star QB for the Jets.
    Last edited by lageman4ever; 03-27-2012 at 07:56 AM.

  6. #6
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    20,306
    Tim Tebow will not be playing 55% of the snaps in 2012. Unless Sanchez get hurt.

    Is Wayne Hunter still the RT?

  7. #7
    Hmmm I certainly remember them acquiring Steve Young, but I definitely don't remember the billboards, press conference to announce the acquisition of Young, nor the press conference with Steve Young and 250 media members. I also don't recall the 49ers intention of disrupting Joe Montana's game flow by pulling him out for 10-20 plays a game to run a gimmick with Young. This is all revisionist history at best.

    The truth was Montana was already firmly entrenched as a starting QB with SF. He was already a potential HOF'er and there was no debate at all of him losing his job. The reason SF made the move to acquire Young was because it was no secret that Joe Montana had back issues, as I recall it cost him time during the regular season and in the playoffs. They wanted a viable backup that could step in if Montana went down. That is why they got Steve Young. It's apples and oranges compared to our situation acquiring Tebow. Hell, it's not even in the same food group. A much more comparable situation was the Eagles acquiring Vince Young. Vick tends to get hurt, Vince Young has faltered a bit but still has signs of potential. But there was never any guarantee of Young getting snaps or any billboards and media frenzy press day to announce his signing.

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=DDNYjets;4418700]Tim Tebow will not be playing 55% of the snaps in 2012. Unless Sanchez get hurt.

    Is Wayne Hunter still the RT?[/QUOTE]

    + 1

    Also, Young had Montana to watch.

    Tebow has Sanchez.

  9. #9
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    6,890
    Great article Kerry. Some of these guys are just not going to get it, or they just don't want to get it.

  10. #10
    Jets Insider VIP
    Board Moderator

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    27,349
    Tebow will never develop into a pocket passer, it would be a waste of his abilities to try to go that route. He should actually be switched to RB, H-Back, and not play QB at all IMO.

  11. #11
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Auggie, FL
    Posts
    1,106
    The Rodgers bit seems more of a reason to not give up on Sanchez yet, than to start/groom Tebow

  12. #12
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    5,581
    I agree that Tebow would have fared better if he stayed in Denver and learned under Manning.

  13. #13
    Great post. I agree the biggest concern is Tebow not learning the same offense as Sanchez. I mean if Sanchez gets hurt are we going change the whole offense? It makes sense on many levels that Tim is learning the whole offense and continuously improving his mechanics to be a pro-style QB. I think the wildcat has to be sprinkled in but as second priority to being the #2 QB.

    My second concern is Sanchez coming off the field for the wildcat. It will disrupt Sanchez's rhythm and we've all seen him pouting when coming off. I really hope that if Tebow does get 20 plays, that he is lined up in the backfield for most of them and we limit his touches at QB to 5 maximum.

  14. #14
    Why can't Tebow become our Gronkowski?

  15. #15
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Winter Springs, Fl
    Posts
    1,366
    nice read..enjoyed it.

  16. #16
    Thanks for the post. Tebow has great upside potential and we got him as our backup #2 QB for cheap.

    Also, FYI:

    QB 1---1st 16 games started---3-13 W-L, 71.2 passer rating.
    QB 2---1st 15 games started---8-7 W-L, 63 passer rating.
    QB 3---1st 14 games started---8-6 W-L, 75.1 passer rating.

    QB 1 is Peyton Manning. QB 2 is Mark Sanchez. QB 3 is Mr. Tebow.

    Tebow's career passer rating might be skewed, because it's based on 23 games played, where he entered for a play or two...but it's not including his 90.0 rating in the playoffs.

    BTW, in college, in the most pro-ready league (the SEC), while both of their teams were national programs---

    Manning---147.1 QB Rating, 89-33 TD-INT, 62.5 completion %, -183 yards rushing.

    Tebow---170.8 QB Rating, 88-16 TD-INT, 66.4 completion %, 2946 yards rushing (4.3 YPC)

    National Championships---Manning 0, Tebow (+ Chris Leak) 2.

    (BTW, Sanchez, with a LOADED USC team---153.9 Rating, 41-16 TD-INT, 64.3 %, 33 rushing)

  17. #17
    Nice post and well thought out, although Tebow's throwing is MUCH worse than Young's at this stage of his career.

    The problem is that Rex has no plans of using Tebow like that. He said yesterday Tebow could get 20-30 snaps A GAME.

    THis will be an unmitigated disaster.

  18. #18
    Great article, great insight to some of the Jets thinking in all of this, and even the potential thinking.

    Based on Rex's comments this morning, he doesn't seem at all concerened about Sanchez' response to the move, and what I mean by that, he say's when media asks him if Sanchez approved of the deal, I loved Rex's response, "Mark is not the GM of the Jets, he's the QB." Rex also mentions how Tebow was also brought in to push Mark, another reason this is a great move.

    Fans latch on to media bull**** about Mark's feelings, statements, etc etc.

    The team's statement is quite simple.

    [I]Mark Sanchez is our starting QB, we just gave him an extension, he's the starter, and right now, the future of this team. Tim Tebow is a football player, and our back-up QB to Mark we feel extremely good about, and Tim is here to push Mark and create competition at the QB position, while also adding a dimension to the offense that our coaching staff feels will be an innovation to the league, and is very excited about. We really don't give a flying **** what Rich Cimini, Bart Hubbach, Gary Myers, Joe Beningo, wfan, espn, or the panicking Jets fans at Jets Insider say about it.[/I]

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=suprjet;4418859]Great post. I agree the biggest concern is Tebow not learning the same offense as Sanchez. I mean if Sanchez gets hurt are we going change the whole offense? It makes sense on many levels that Tim is learning the whole offense and continuously improving his mechanics to be a pro-style QB. I think the wildcat has to be sprinkled in but as second priority to being the #2 QB.

    My second concern is Sanchez coming off the field for the wildcat. It will disrupt Sanchez's rhythm and we've all seen him pouting when coming off. I really hope that if Tebow does get 20 plays, that he is lined up in the backfield for most of them and we limit his touches at QB to 5 maximum.[/QUOTE]

    Sanchez had a better rhythm in years 1 & 2 when he was pulled for the various wildcat plays consistently. Last year they hardly did it and Sanchise never had any rhythm at all. This whole idea of "disrupting a QB's rhythm", when he doesn't have one in the first place, is pure fallacy.

  20. #20
    [QUOTE=johnnysd;4419010]Nice post and well thought out, although Tebow's throwing is MUCH worse than Young's at this stage of his career.

    The problem is that Rex has no plans of using Tebow like that. He said yesterday Tebow could get 20-30 snaps A GAME.

    THis will be an unmitigated disaster.[/QUOTE]

    I heard "up to 20" Never heard 20-30. Is there some sort of Broken telephone game going on around here?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us