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Thread: Autism Rates Increase Again

  1. #1
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    Autism Rates Increase Again

    So, the CDC has just released the latest autism prevalence numbers and it has increased (big surprise) again, now at 1 in 88 overall and 1 in 54(!) for boys. The saddest part about all of this is that regardless of what you feel is the cause, the CDC et al, continue to downplay this and refuse to call it for what it is, an epidemic of staggering magnitude.

    I can't quite understand the latest canned answer that claims it is due to a broadened spectrum and better diagnosing. That has already been disproved as the sole cause for the increase. But I'm sure that won't stop the same crowd from playing up a decrease when the diagnostic criteria changes with the latest version of the DSM. :rolleyes:

    [url]http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120329142630.htm[/url]

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    Issues such as autism frighten me immensely as I await the birth of my first grandchild.

    I guess I will just have to hope for the best.

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    1 in 88 is a shocking ratio.

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    [QUOTE=Bonhomme Richard;4421882]1 in 88 is a shocking ratio.[/QUOTE]

    And yet the CDC still refuses to refer to it as an epidemic. It's utterly bizarre. Even the usually straddling-the-fence organization Autism Speaks has sounded the alarm:

    [quote=Autism Speaks]The following remarks were delivered by Mark Roithmayr, president of Autism Speaks, at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta on March 29, 2012.

    Merriam-Webster defines the word epidemic as "Excessively prevalent. Affecting a disproportionately large number of individuals within a population, community or region at the same time."

    With the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention numbers now showing that 1 in 88 children in the United States are being diagnosed with autism nearly a doubling of the prevalence since the CDC began tracking these numbers autism can now officially be declared an epidemic in the United States.

    We are dealing with a national emergency that is in need of a national strategy. [B]At 1 in 88, we now have over 1 million children directly affected by autism. According to a newly released study the annual cost of autism in the United States is a staggering $126 billion annually, more than tripling the cost analysis from six years ago.[/B]

    Behind all these statistics are real families, real individuals struggling each and every day. Some with autism are struggling to find satisfying jobs where they can productively use their talents and abilities. Others with autism have extremely complicated medical and social challenges. Make no mistake though, wherever one falls on the spectrum, all with autism struggle each and every day. And it is clearly time we, as a caring society, commit to a National Strategy. A comprehensive National Strategy that substantially increases all efforts to date. A call to action that:

    [LIST][*]Funds more basic science uncovering the genetic underpinnings of autism.[*]Funds more environmental research detecting the causes of autism.[*]Accelerates the funding and development of effective medicines and treatments.[*]Commits to a strategy where all children with autism from every background are diagnosed no later than 18 months of age.[*]Commits to a National Training Corps recruiting more therapists and service providers as well as specially trained teachers and teacher assistants into the field.[*]We also need to address the growing issue of adults with autism specifically around continuing education, employment, housing/residential living and community integration. Here too, we need a focus on a National Training Corps to recruit and train professionals to work with our adults.[/LIST]

    As the nation's leading science and advocacy organization, Autism Speaks today calls on the entire nation to commit to this National Strategy, a true public-private partnership:

    [LIST][*]From President Obama to each of the Republican candidates for President to all Members of Congress.[/LIST]

    We desperately need further commitments from....
    [LIST][*]The CDC and Dr. Frieden whose very funding of this prevalence study is in jeopardy of being cut going forward.[*]Secretary Sebelius and the Department of Health and Human Services.[*]Dr. Francis Collins and the National Institutes of Health.[/LIST]

    And it is not the federal government alone we call on. We need the private sector as well as state and local governments to be part of this National Strategy:

    [LIST][*]Right now insurance companies and the majority of self-funded plans under ERISA discriminate against families with autism denying reimbursement for the basic, evidenced based services that can often dramatically improve the quality of life for their children with autism.[*]There are pharmaceutical companies who can speed the process of effective medicines for people living with autism to improve communication, socialization and behavior, the core symptoms of autism.[*]We need companies across all industries to commit to hiring the 74% of adults with autism who believe they have the potential to be employed if just given the opportunity.[*]And we need employers of all parents who have children with autism to become much, more family friendly as way too many mothers of children with autism have had to stop out of their careers to be able to care for their loved ones because their work environments could not find a way to accommodate their schedules.[*]We need local school systems to deliver individualized and quality driven plans to meet autism's ever growing demand for appropriate special education services.[*]We need faith based and community based organizations who can provide respite services for parents and caregivers as well as recreational and community integration opportunities for people with autism.[*]And the list goes on to include siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends and neighbors. At 1 in 88, we are now hard pressed as a nation to find anyone who is not touched by autism.[/LIST]

    Ultimately the question we need to ask ourselves is why over the last two decades has there been such a tremendous increase in autism? Dr. Peter Bearman of Columbia University was funded by the NIH to answer this very question. His findings have revealed that the increase in prevalence is only partly explained by a broadening of the diagnosis, improved detection, and more awareness. A large portion of the increase some 50% remains unexplained. That is why we must aggressively fund research, including the critical study of potential environmental factors. We need to find the answers.

    [B]At 1 in 88, let me be clear, the United States is experiencing an autism epidemic.[/B]

    This is a national emergency. We need a national strategy.[/quote]

    Childhood obesity has been declared a national epidemic. So has trampoline injuries(!). But 1% of children suffering from autism spectrum disorders isn't. As you can see above, NIH has shown that what you are reading in the papers that the increase is due to better diagnosing and a broader definition isn't true. The obfuscation of the truth regarding this disorder is, IMHO, unprecedented.

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    1 in 44 in NJ, is a stat I just heard this morning. Jetworks, are the numbers higher than anyone would ever think because of the many different types of autism?

    My buddy's child was diagnosed at a very young age and he chose to not declare it for insurance purposes and sent his child for help out of pocket and now his child is doing great. I'm not trying to minimize this at all, just curious of what you thought because you are very informed when it comes to this area.

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    [QUOTE=cr726;4422346]1 in 44 in NJ, is a stat I just heard this morning. Jetworks, are the numbers higher than anyone would ever think because of the many different types of autism?

    My buddy's child was diagnosed at a very young age and he chose to not declare it for insurance purposes and sent his child for help out of pocket and now his child is doing great. I'm not trying to minimize this at all, just curious of what you thought because you are very informed when it comes to this area.[/QUOTE]

    The latest number I heard for NJ was 1 in 49, which was the second highest rate of states in the study; Utah was first at 1 in 47 and Alabama last at 1 in 210. So clearly a case can be made that there is some diagnostic deficiencies at play here when it comes to resources/methods.

    The common theme as of late is that since autism is diagnosed as a spectrum disorder, there is a likelihood that there is no significant, real increase, it's just broadly defined and more readily identified due to better awareness. Naturally I disagree with that assessment and there are two very good studies that back that up, most recently one that was funded by the NIH. Simply put, there is a significant increase in prevalence of the disorder, one that cannot be explained solely through better awareness and broad diagnostic criteria. The next version of the DSM (V) will get rid of many current autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger's and PDD-NOS. That will in turn likely lower the numbers, which conveniently coincides with the next ADDM cohort that was....well, I'll leave that for another thread.

    I'm not sure why he wouldn't declare an autism diagnosis for insurance purposes as it has only recently begun to be covered in certain states, and in a limited fashion at that. So even declaring it would have forced him to pay for everything himself anyway. I'm glad to hear his kiddo is doing well, some of them do experience a recovery with medical interventions. Unfortunately, many do not.:(

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    Thanks for the reply. As for my buddy I think he didnt want his son labeled by the insurance company and thought it would be forever in his record even if the therapy worked.

    I agree with your assessment the ADD stuff too. Hope your daughter is doing well.



    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4422359]The latest number I heard for NJ was 1 in 49, which was the second highest rate of states in the study; Utah was first at 1 in 47 and Alabama last at 1 in 210. So clearly a case can be made that there is some diagnostic deficiencies at play here when it comes to resources/methods.

    The common theme as of late is that since autism is diagnosed as a spectrum disorder, there is a likelihood that there is no significant, real increase, it's just broadly defined and more readily identified due to better awareness. Naturally I disagree with that assessment and there are two very good studies that back that up, most recently one that was funded by the NIH. Simply put, there is a significant increase in prevalence of the disorder, one that cannot be explained solely through better awareness and broad diagnostic criteria. The next version of the DSM (V) will get rid of many current autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger's and PDD-NOS. That will in turn likely lower the numbers, which conveniently coincides with the next ADDM cohort that was....well, I'll leave that for another thread.

    I'm not sure why he wouldn't declare an autism diagnosis for insurance purposes as it has only recently begun to be covered in certain states, and in a limited fashion at that. So even declaring it would have forced him to pay for everything himself anyway. I'm glad to hear his kiddo is doing well, some of them do experience a recovery with medical interventions. Unfortunately, many do not.:([/QUOTE]

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    [QUOTE=Jetworks;4422359]The latest number I heard for NJ was 1 in 49, which was the second highest rate of states in the study; Utah was first at 1 in 47 and Alabama last at 1 in 210. So clearly a case can be made that there is some diagnostic deficiencies at play here when it comes to resources/methods.

    The common theme as of late is that since autism is diagnosed as a spectrum disorder, there is a likelihood that there is no significant, real increase, it's just broadly defined and more readily identified due to better awareness. Naturally I disagree with that assessment and there are two very good studies that back that up, most recently one that was funded by the NIH. Simply put, there is a significant increase in prevalence of the disorder, one that cannot be explained solely through better awareness and broad diagnostic criteria. The next version of the DSM (V) will get rid of many current autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger's and PDD-NOS. That will in turn likely lower the numbers, which conveniently coincides with the next ADDM cohort that was....well, I'll leave that for another thread.

    I'm not sure why he wouldn't declare an autism diagnosis for insurance purposes as it has only recently begun to be covered in certain states, and in a limited fashion at that. So even declaring it would have forced him to pay for everything himself anyway. I'm glad to hear his kiddo is doing well, some of them do experience a recovery with medical interventions. Unfortunately, many do not.:([/QUOTE]

    Just curious how do the American numbers relate to the diagnosis in other countries.

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    [QUOTE=cr726;4422400]Thanks for the reply. As for my buddy I think he didnt want his son labeled by the insurance company and thought it would be forever in his record even if the therapy worked.

    I agree with your assessment the ADD stuff too. Hope your daughter is doing well.[/QUOTE]

    Thanks, she's doing well for the most part. Puberty has proven to be as difficult as advertised, but we're managing.

    [QUOTE=Trades;4422421]Just curious how do the American numbers relate to the diagnosis in other countries.[/QUOTE]

    AFAIK, the numbers found in the US outpace those found in all other "developed" countries, by a very wide margin.

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    1 in 88 is a colossal tragedy.

    Has there been any studies relating autism to how women are giving birth when they are older nowadays?

    Or any studies about possible environmental causes?

    Reason I ask is b.c here on LI it seems that autism is even more prevalent than 1 in 88 and a lot of the women are well into their 30s when they have their first pregnancy.

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    chemicals, preservatives, steriods in our foods.


    funny how the epidemic seems to line up with what the food industry has been serving us for the last 30 years

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    [QUOTE=DDNYjets;4422476]1 in 88 is a colossal tragedy.

    Has there been any studies relating autism to how women are giving birth when they are older nowadays?

    Or any studies about possible environmental causes?

    Reason I ask is b.c here on LI it seems that autism is even more prevalent than 1 in 88 and a lot of the women are well into their 30s when they have their first pregnancy.[/QUOTE]

    I think in general women throughout the country are waiting longer to have their first child than say 30 years ago.

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    [QUOTE=Bonhomme Richard;4422558]I think in general women throughout the country are waiting longer to have their first child than say 30 years ago.[/QUOTE]

    So long as DD's point isn't true, I personally think it's a great thing for the country as a whole...

    I wish more women chose that route for a plethora of reasons...

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    [QUOTE=dickkotite;4422488]chemicals, preservatives, steriods in our foods.


    funny how the epidemic seems to line up with what the food industry has been serving us for the last 30 years[/QUOTE]

    It also lines up nicely with the invention and continued growth of the internet. And new flavors of M&M's.

    It'd be nice if you could make a solid scientific connection between the two for cause and effect, but you can't.

    Guessing is fun, though.

    The sad truth is, we simply don't know right now.

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    [QUOTE=JetPotato;4422586]It also lines up nicely with the invention and continued growth of the internet. And new flavors of M&M's.

    It'd be nice if you could make a solid scientific connection between the two for cause and effect, but you can't.

    Guessing is fun, though.

    The sad truth is, we simply don't know right now.[/QUOTE]

    are you kidding me? you dont think major changes to food, stuff we digest every day with things that never used to be there, couldnt be a srong possibility>???

    id like to hear a better theory

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    [QUOTE=AlwaysGreenAlwaysWhite;4422574]So long as DD's point isn't true, I personally think it's a great thing for the country as a whole...

    I wish more women chose that route for a plethora of reasons...[/QUOTE]

    i would think there are stats kept on that and it could be proven or thrown out

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    [QUOTE=dickkotite;4422616]are you kidding me? you dont think major changes to food, stuff we digest every day with things that never used to be there, couldnt be a srong possibility>???

    id like to hear a better theory[/QUOTE]

    There is a huge difference between a possibility and a decisive assignable cause.

    It's nothing but irresponsible, misleading and potentially damaging to those who need treatment/prevention to assign blame without actual proof.

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    [QUOTE=JetPotato;4422586]It also lines up nicely with the invention and continued growth of the internet. And new flavors of M&M's.

    It'd be nice if you could make a solid scientific connection between the two for cause and effect, but you can't.

    Guessing is fun, though.

    The sad truth is, we simply don't know right now.[/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE=JetPotato;4422664]There is a huge difference between a possibility and a decisive assignable cause.

    It's nothing but irresponsible, misleading and potentially damaging to those who need treatment/prevention to assign blame without actual proof.[/QUOTE]

    And yet the scientific community by and large have no problem saying that "vaccines don't cause autism", all the while knowing that all vaccines and adjuvants haven't been looked at individually, let alone as a whole. Is that not misleading, damaging and morally irresponsible?

    The real sad truth isn't that we don't know right now; it's that no one is willing to look at everything that should be on the table. Instead we get more epidemiological studies, ridiculously expensive gene research that leads to few answers and more rhetoric about how it can't be the environment otherwise everyone would be affected.:rolleyes:
    Last edited by Jetworks; 03-30-2012 at 11:41 AM.

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    [QUOTE=DDNYjets;4422476]1 in 88 is a colossal tragedy.

    Has there been any studies relating autism to how women are giving birth when they are older nowadays?

    Or any studies about possible environmental causes?

    Reason I ask is b.c here on LI it seems that autism is even more prevalent than 1 in 88 and a lot of the women are well into their 30s when they have their first pregnancy.[/QUOTE]

    There are studies that take into account the age of the parents, yes. Some show a positive correlation, others do not. The environmental nut is a tougher one to crack. There have been studies about proximity to highways, coal burning plants, one vaccine and one vaccine ingredient. That's all I know of. I wonder why they don't look into more stuff like that instead of pouring millions into gene research?

    Oh, that's right; there's no liability for anyone other than the parent if it's genetic. Stupid me.:rolleyes:

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    [QUOTE=dickkotite;4422622]i would think there are stats kept on that and it could be proven or thrown out[/QUOTE]

    I agree somewhat with this theory. We eat horribly in America. Big Government forcing pink slime on our kids at school. Prepackaged processed foods were unheard of 100 years ago. Now basically everything we eat is processed. Look at the ingredients of an average loaf of bread we buy at the supermarket. It is scary. Bread should not stay fresh for 2 weeks.

    My wife and I have been trying to eliminate heavily processed foods from our diet and it is crazy hard. Deli meats is another example of something most people think is fine. It is full of sulfates and preservatives. Utter garbage.

    I have been looking in to a bread machine to make fresh whole grain bread with just 3-4 ingredients. Also looking in to juicing.

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