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Thread: Floating Offshore Wind Kit Gets Spur From U.S., Britain

  1. #1
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    Floating Offshore Wind Kit Gets Spur From U.S., Britain

    [URL="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-22/floating-offshore-wind-kit-gets-spur-from-u-s-britain.html"]http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-22/floating-offshore-wind-kit-gets-spur-from-u-s-britain.html[/URL]

    [QUOTE]

    Britain and the U.S. said they’d fund work on offshore wind generation technologies that work in waters as much as 500 feet deep, a measure aimed at opening vast new areas of ocean to development.

    U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and his U.K. counterpart Edward Davey said their departments will collaborate on ways to spur development of floating platforms for offshore wind turbines that can be stationed in depths beyond 60 meters (200 feet), the limit for traditional structures fixed to the seabed.

    “Turbines will be able to locate in ever deeper waters where the wind is stronger but without the expense of foundations down to the seabed,” Davey said today in a statement from the Department of Energy and Climate Change.

    The pact is the first of a series of agreements the U.K. government plans to sign with some of the 23 nations represented at the Clean Energy Ministerial meeting this week in London. Chu and Davy are hosting the gathering, where ministers will discuss practical steps to spread clean energy technologies.

    Investors such as Japanese trading house Marubeni Corp. (8002) and pension funds including PensionDanmark A/S are channeling money into European wind projects as governments step up support for weaning utilities off fossil fuels. Vestas Wind Systems A/S (VWS), General Electric Co. (GE) and Siemens AG (SIE) are building turbines for use offshore.

    Offshore Wind

    Britain and Germany are leading construction of 35.5 gigawatts of offshore wind plants by 2020, requiring about 127 billion euros ($168 billion) of investment, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. The facilities will provide 3.2 percent of the European Union’s electricity demand.

    Britain has about a third of the potential sites for offshore wind farms in Europe, more than any other nation. Traditional offshore wind turbines are fixed to towers cemented to the seabed and are limited to waters shallow enough to support such structures. Many of those will be developed by 2020.

    Davey wants to push turbines into deeper waters where winds are consistently stronger. That would require floating platforms for the turbines -- much like the kind the oil industry relies on to tap deposits in the North Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Turbines on floating systems also could be towed to shore for more extensive repairs, saving maintenance costs, Davey said.

    Exploiting Resources

    “Floating wind turbines will allow us to exploit more of our wind resource, potentially more cheaply,” Davey said. “Britain has more wind turbines installed around its shores than any other country in the world and our market is rated year after year as the most attractive market among investors.”

    Today’s agreement will bring together separate British and U.S. government programs on renewable energy technologies.

    Britain is offering 25 million pounds ($40.3 million) to contractors who can demonstrate floating offshore wind technology and will pick winners of the funds next year. The program seeks turbines that can generate as much as 7 megawatts of power by 2016. The U.S. has offered $180 million for four demonstration projects, one of which may include a floating wind power system.

    Countries represented at the Clean Energy Ministerial include Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, United Arab Emirates, the U.K. and U.S. as well as the European Commission.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Reed Landberg in London at [email]landberg@bloomberg.net[/email]

    To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dick Schumacher at [email]dschumacher@bloomberg.net[/email]

    [/QUOTE]

  2. #2
    Great, just don't place them off Hyannis Port.

    Uncle Teddy might return from the grave.....

  3. #3
    And this is good for the environment? How do we know the impact this will have down the road?

  4. #4
    this is stupid.

    wind power is a great idea, but why complicate things and multiply the cost a million fold by putting them out at sea? just slap em on land

  5. #5
    [QUOTE=Buster;4442416][URL="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-22/floating-offshore-wind-kit-gets-spur-from-u-s-britain.html"]http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-22/floating-offshore-wind-kit-gets-spur-from-u-s-britain.html[/URL][/QUOTE]

    YIPPIE!!!! I Smell some more stim-u-loss$$$$$ and Quid-pro-quot for Pelosi's family and Obama donors!!!!

  6. #6
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    [IMG]http://www.consoleandhollawell.com/law-blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Wind-Turbine-Fire.jpg[/IMG]

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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4442585]And this is good for the environment? How do we know the impact this will have down the road?[/QUOTE]


    My guess is... if there is a problem they can be towed ashore. Since they are floating.

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=dickkotite;4442590]this is stupid.

    wind power is a great idea, but why complicate things and multiply the cost a million fold by putting them out at sea? just slap em on land[/QUOTE]


    it has been a while since I have been far off shore but I hear it is windy.

    My guess is the lack of obstructions has something to do with it.



    [QUOTE]“[B]Turbines will be able to locate in ever deeper waters where the wind is stronger but without the expense of foundations down to the seabed,” [/B]Davey said today in a statement from the Department of Energy and Climate Change.[/QUOTE]

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    I find it crazy that some folks read about solar or wind generated energy being cost effective and they immediately go into attack mode.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=Buster;4443579]My guess is... if there is a problem they can be towed ashore. Since they are floating.[/QUOTE]

    My guess like daming rivers for Hydro electric, a nightmare for the environment, they won't be.

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4443780]My guess like daming rivers for Hydro electric, a nightmare for the environment, they won't be.[/QUOTE]

    I would like to see a long term environmental impact study on this and see what we are really getting into before we just say renewables are good carbon is bad. The footprint of these projects relative to the energy they produce is enormous.

  12. #12
    [QUOTE=Buster;4443583]it has been a while since I have been far off shore but I hear it is windy.

    My guess is the lack of obstructions has something to do with it.[/QUOTE]


    what you expected me to read that whole thing

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4443782]I would like to see a long term environmental impact study on this and see what we are really getting into before we just say renewables are good carbon is bad. The footprint of these projects relative to the energy they produce is enormous.[/QUOTE]

    Renewable energy like wind and solar don't make sense? Oil will never run out?

  14. #14
    [QUOTE=cr726;4443799]Renewable energy like wind and solar don't make sense? Oil will never run out?[/QUOTE]

    Not the point at. We have millions of structures across the country that solar panels can be put on without disturbing the natural enviroment that are already hooked up to the grid. How will giant wind parks in the ocean impact air flow, tides, migrating birds, fish, etc. Do you know the long term issues? Do you realize the enviromental damage that hydro electric power produced by dams has caused?

    Paving over the oceans and deserts isn't good because libs think the oceans and deserts aren't part of the environment.
    Last edited by Winstonbiggs; 04-24-2012 at 10:16 AM.

  15. #15
    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4443980]Not the point at. We have millions of structures across the country that solar panels can be put on without disturbing the natural enviroment that are already hooked up to the grid. How will giant wind parks in the ocean impact air flow, tides, migrating birds, fish, etc. Do you know the long term issues? Do you realize the enviromental damage that hydro electric power produced by dams has caused?

    Paving over the oceans and deserts isn't good because libs think the oceans and deserts aren't part of the environment.[/QUOTE]

    Do we know what will happen to all the energy related things we have done within the U.S? West Virginia is stripping everything no?

  16. #16
    I probably missed something, but how are they planning to get the power from the turbines to the shore?

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;4445284]I probably missed something, but how are they planning to get the power from the turbines to the shore?[/QUOTE]

    my guess would be like everywhere else. they'd use cables. Which has been done for a long time.


    [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Atlantic_cable"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Atlantic_cable[/URL]


    [QUOTE]
    The transatlantic telegraph cable was the first cable used for telegraph communications laid across the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. The first communications occurred August 16, 1858.
    [/QUOTE]

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4443980]Not the point at. We have millions of structures across the country that solar panels can be put on without disturbing the natural enviroment that are already hooked up to the grid. How will giant wind parks in the ocean impact air flow, tides, migrating birds, fish, etc. Do you know the long term issues? Do you realize the enviromental damage that hydro electric power produced by dams has caused?

    Paving over the oceans and deserts isn't good because libs think the oceans and deserts aren't part of the environment.[/QUOTE]

    A hydroelectric plant is a giant structure. This article is talking about FLOATING platforms.

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=Buster;4448504]my guess would be like everywhere else. they'd use cables. Which has been done for a long time.


    [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Atlantic_cable"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Atlantic_cable[/URL][/QUOTE]

    Then the turbines would be attached to the cables. How do they repair them.

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=MnJetFan;4448783]Then the turbines would be attached to the cables. How do they repair them.[/QUOTE]

    The Turbines would sit on a floating platform out at sea. The platform would (i assume) be a less nasty (in that there would be no oil) oil rig. The Cable at one end would connect to the rig and at the other end a power grid..



    [URL="http://www.bwea.com/energy/how.html"]http://www.bwea.com/energy/how.html[/URL]

    [QUOTE]

    1.The wind blows on the blades and makes them turn.
    2.The blades turns a shaft inside the nacelle (the box at the top of the turbine)
    3.The shaft goes into a gearbox which increases the rotation speed enough for...
    4.The generator, which uses magnetic fields to convert the rotational energy into electrical energy. These are similar to those found in normal power stations.
    5.The power output goes to a transformer, which converts the electricity coming out of the generator at around 700 Volts (V) to the right voltage for distribution system, typically 33,000 V.
    6.The national grid transmits the power around the country.

    [/QUOTE]

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