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Thread: GO BUFFALO!

  1. #21
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    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455302]Is 50k a lot? :confused:[/QUOTE]


    It's the AMI of the entire country.


    Now...go vote for Teresa Heinz Romney.

  2. #22
    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455302]Is 50k a lot? :confused:[/QUOTE]

    Stop being a jackass and admit that there's a problem.

    For 180 days? yes. The median sales price for homes in Buffalo NY for Mar 11 to May 11 was $62000. A mortgage of 300.00 a month FREE, FREE, FREE, MED!!! And when does that pension start?
    In retirement, John H. George does a little painting, spends a lot of time with his grandchildren and devotes himself to the North Tonawanda Botanical Gardens. He’s spending his golden years much like countless other Western New Yorkers. Except for one thing. His public pension — $205,809 a year — exceeds his former salary.

    It’s the biggest state pension of any retired public employee in Western New York and the ninth largest statewide. It also was years in the making.

    When George was ready to retire from the North Tonawanda schools at age 64, he cashed in hundreds of days of unused vacation and sick time he had racked up during 17 years as superintendent.

    As a result, during his final 12 months on the job, George received more than $500,000. When the state calculated his pension, that extra money was counted.

    “I wouldn’t apologize for it,” he said. “It was some unusual circumstances I happened to be in that resulted in that. I certainly paid my dues.”

    Thousands of other retired educators in Western New York and throughout the state enjoy the fruits of similar end-of-career payouts that fatten their pensions, too.

    Like the former Lewiston-Porter school superintendent who also engineered a pension — $143,802 — that was bigger than his salary.

    Or the retired Buffalo high school principal with a six-figure pension.

    And the Depew math teacher with a pension of more than $90,000 a year — about equal to his pay while working.

    “It is this elephant in the room that’s been growing more obese this decade that everyone refuses to recognize,” said Edmund J. McMahon, director of the Empire Center for New York State Policy, a conservative think tank. “The issue is, somebody’s paying. All this stuff has a cost.”

    System invites abuse

    Pension costs to New York taxpayers have increased fivefold since 2000.

  3. #23
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    [QUOTE=acepepe;4455333]Pension costs to New York taxpayers have increased fivefold since 2000.[/QUOTE]

    Lets talk about the pension costs of Texas State Workers.


    The state that has added hundreds of thousands of more federal and state jobs in the past 5 years than all of the other states combined.

  4. #24
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4455374]Lets talk about the pension costs of Texas State Workers.


    The state that has added hundreds of thousands of more federal and state jobs in the past 5 years than all of the other states combined.[/QUOTE]

    1. We have no control over federal jobs 2. We have a solid economy and growing population witch requires a larger logistical staff. NEXT DUM (sic) comment, please!

  5. #25
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    [QUOTE=acepepe;4455383]1. We have no control over federal jobs[/QUOTE]

    Yes. Yes you do.


    Rick Perry petitioned the federal government for more federal funds than any other governor in the country.


    Texas sucks off of the federal teat faster than any other state in the union. Accept it.

  6. #26
    [QUOTE=PlumberKhan;4455390]Yes. Yes you do.


    Rick Perry petitioned the federal government for more federal funds than any other governor in the country.


    Texas sucks off of the federal teat faster than any other state in the union. Accept it.[/QUOTE]

    Texas receives 0.94 per tax dollar paid. N. Mexico gets 2$ plus. Next stoopid remark.

  7. #27
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    [QUOTE=acepepe;4455415]Texas receives 0.94 per tax dollar paid. N. Mexico gets 2$ plus. Next stoopid remark.[/QUOTE]

    NY receives 0.79.


    Next stoopid remark, Texa-can't....


    Sent from my Double-Wide using Semaphore...

  8. #28
    [QUOTE=acepepe;4455415]Texas receives 0.94 per tax dollar paid. N. Mexico gets 2$ plus. Next stoopid remark.[/QUOTE]


    Stay classy Texas.

    [QUOTE]Texas was the state that depended the most on those very stimulus funds to plug nearly 97% of its shortfall for fiscal 2010, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.[/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE]Texas, which crafts a budget every two years, was facing a $6.6 billion shortfall for its 2010-2011 fiscal years. It plugged nearly all of that deficit with $6.4 billion in Recovery Act money, allowing it to leave its $9.1 billion rainy day fund untouched.[/QUOTE]

  9. #29
    [QUOTE=cr726;4455428]Stay classy Texas.[/QUOTE]

    And just what did PA and NY squander there money on? we HAVE to have a balanced budget, that's why we're solvent.

  10. #30
    [QUOTE=acepepe;4455333]Stop being a jackass and admit that there's a problem.

    For 180 days? yes. The median sales price for homes in Buffalo NY for Mar 11 to May 11 was $62000. A mortgage of 300.00 a month FREE, FREE, FREE, MED!!! And when does that pension start?
    In retirement, John H. George does a little painting, spends a lot of time with his grandchildren and devotes himself to the North Tonawanda Botanical Gardens. He’s spending his golden years much like countless other Western New Yorkers. Except for one thing. His public pension — $205,809 a year — exceeds his former salary.

    It’s the biggest state pension of any retired public employee in Western New York and the ninth largest statewide. It also was years in the making.

    When George was ready to retire from the North Tonawanda schools at age 64, he cashed in hundreds of days of unused vacation and sick time he had racked up during 17 years as superintendent.

    As a result, during his final 12 months on the job, George received more than $500,000. When the state calculated his pension, that extra money was counted.

    “I wouldn’t apologize for it,” he said. “It was some unusual circumstances I happened to be in that resulted in that. I certainly paid my dues.”

    Thousands of other retired educators in Western New York and throughout the state enjoy the fruits of similar end-of-career payouts that fatten their pensions, too.

    Like the former Lewiston-Porter school superintendent who also engineered a pension — $143,802 — that was bigger than his salary.

    Or the retired Buffalo high school principal with a six-figure pension.

    And the Depew math teacher with a pension of more than $90,000 a year — about equal to his pay while working.

    “It is this elephant in the room that’s been growing more obese this decade that everyone refuses to recognize,” said Edmund J. McMahon, director of the Empire Center for New York State Policy, a conservative think tank. “The issue is, somebody’s paying. All this stuff has a cost.”

    System invites abuse

    Pension costs to New York taxpayers have increased fivefold since 2000.[/QUOTE]

    Well I don't live in Buffalo I live in Mass.

    Here you teach for about 35 years, top out a about 80k, and retire with about 80% of that.

    It's a good gig, but certainly not over the top. 80k don't make you rich in Mass.

  11. #31
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    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455472]Well I don't live in Buffalo I live in Mass.

    Here you teach for about 35 years, top out a about 80k, and retire with about 80% of that.

    It's a good gig, but certainly not over the top. 80k don't make you rich in Mass.[/QUOTE]

    So a gym teacher, can retire at say 57 or 58 on 65K of pension for about 30 years with full health benefits.

    Yeah..... that sounds like a good deal to the taxpayers.:rolleyes:

    Pensions were meant to ensure that employees dont live in poverty..not put their municipaility in poverty and provide something that is unavailable to the taxpayers. Radical I know. Some reform is needed.

  12. #32
    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455472]Well I don't live in Buffalo I live in Mass.

    Here you teach for about 35 years, top out a about 80k, and retire with about 80% of that.

    It's a good gig, but certainly not over the top. 80k don't make you rich in Mass.[/QUOTE]

    This truly is one of those local issues. I know other teachers in Mass and they don't make much money. Florida is that way as well. You constantly question salary data I give you from NY and NJ but the system here is different. Salaries are much higher and the benefits are crazy. We have loopholes that allow for gaming the system through manupulation of overtime. We have some retired teachers (and police) making over 150K per year on pension.

  13. #33
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    [QUOTE=chiefst2000;4455759]This truly is one of those local issues. I know other teachers in Mass and they don't make much money. Florida is that way as well. You constantly question salary data I give you from NY and NJ but the system here is different. Salaries are much higher and the benefits are crazy. We have loopholes that allow for gaming the system through manupulation of overtime. We have some retired teachers (and police) making over 150K per year on pension.[/QUOTE]

    Add to that...everyone accuses me of "bashing" civil servants. Here in NC teachers and police are underpaid. no question.

    A study was done that showed that over 80 percent of civil servants(police, fire, sanitation, etc...) in NY work approximately 20 percent OT in their last years and it in effect makes their pension equal to their base pay. They retire in their 40's and 50's on 70K plus. Glad I moved.

  14. #34
    [QUOTE=southparkcpa;4455734]So a gym teacher, can retire at say 57 or 58 on 65K of pension for about 30 years with full health benefits.

    Yeah..... that sounds like a good deal to the taxpayers.:rolleyes:

    Pensions were meant to ensure that employees dont live in poverty..not put their municipaility in poverty and provide something that is unavailable to the taxpayers. Radical I know. Some reform is needed.[/QUOTE]

    Most retire at about 62, and yes that is possible. Except average life expectancy is about 78 nowadays, so thats about 16 years, not 30. Also, they are NOT eligible for SS, (even there spouses should the pass).

    I would say your average person, working 35 years can easily amass enough wealth to generate 65k a year, esp. if they are taking SS. You would only need about a million for that.

    And everyone has a million right? I hear folks are giving their kids all kinds of money, so they must.
    Last edited by FF2®; 05-01-2012 at 10:04 AM.

  15. #35
    [QUOTE=southparkcpa;4455778]Add to that...everyone accuses me of "bashing" civil servants. Here in NC teachers and police are underpaid. no question.

    A study was done that showed that over 80 percent of civil servants(police, fire, sanitation, etc...) in NY work approximately 20 percent OT in their last years and it in effect makes their pension equal to their base pay. They retire in their 40's and 50's on 70K plus. Glad I moved.[/QUOTE]

    Can you show me the link where a sanitation worker retired at 40 and make 70k+ in retirement please?

    I'll wait.

  16. #36
    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455797]Can you show me the link where a sanitation worker retired at 40 and make 70k+ in retirement please?

    I'll wait.[/QUOTE]

    Please FF there are articles galore here in NY detailing this stuff.

    [url]http://articles.boston.com/2011-10-28/news/30333165_1_disability-cases-pension-and-disability-payments-pension-system[/url]

    [url]http://articles.courant.com/2012-01-24/news/hc-gop-senators-take-overtime-out-of-pension-calculations-20120124_1_pension-calculations-hazardous-duty-employees-hazardous-duty-employees[/url]

    [url]http://www.newsmax.com/WayneAllynRoot/Government-Employee-Scandal-pension/2012/03/05/id/431489[/url]

    This is from today:

    The Government Employee Scandal
    Monday, 05 Mar 2012 05:22 PM
    By Wayne Allyn Root


    How would you like to retire with $6 million? $8 million? $10 million? All you have to do is become a government employee to hit the jackpot.

    You don’t believe me? Do the math. I recently talked with a retired New York City toll taker. His salary averaged about $70,000 per year over 20 years. But in his last few years he worked loads of overtime and added in accumulated sick days to get his salary in those final years up to $150,000. His pension is based on his final years' salary.

    This is a common pension-padding ploy.

    This retired toll taker will now get a taxpayer-funded pension of $120,000 a year for the rest of his life. He’s only 50 years old. The average 50-year-old male has a life expectancy of almost 80. With automatic cost-of-living increases, that’s a bill to taxpayers of $5 million for the next 30 years — for not working. Three times what he earned while working!

    But here's a frightening question: What if he lives to 90? Or 100? His pension could rise to $6 million or $8 million or higher.

    Multiply this times 21 million government employees (on the federal, state, and local level) and you now get a sense of one of the biggest spending problems bankrupting America.

    President Barack Obama constantly boasts that he has "saved" government employee jobs. Well that's not a positive. It's a negative. Every government job you saved costs taxpayers millions in bloated salary, obscene pension, and free healthcare for life.

    Are these stories the exception, rather than the rule?

    Over 77,000 federal government employees earned more than the governor of their state.

    On the federal level, it was just reported by USA Today that the average federal civil servant compensation is $123,049 per year. That’s more than double what private-sector workers earn (average of $61,051).

    Since 2000, federal government employee compensation has grown by 36.9 percent versus 8.8 percent for private-sector employees.

    But it's at the state and local level that the worst problem exists.

    In Las Vegas (Clark County) the average firefighter earns $199,678 per year. When he retires at age 45 or 50, we owe his pension for life. But here’s the clincher — when he finally dies, the taxpayer has to continue paying the pension to his spouse. Add up the damage to the economy. It is catastrophic. Talk about a 1 percenter — a single firefighter could retire with $8 to $10 million for not working for the rest of his life. This is madness.

    Now I agree that policemen and firefighters are heroes. But should all heroes retire on 6-figure pensions, paid by taxpayers? It would be nice if they could, but it's unaffordable. It will bankrupt a nation. Ask Greece. Or ask California.

    But the reality is that police and firemen make up a small portion of government employees. Recent studies prove the average janitor that works for government makes over $600,000 more in his career than a private-sector janitor. Are janitors heroes too? This goes on at every level of government.

    The Las Vegas Review Journal had three stories in one day recently that sums up this national outrage.

    Let’s start with the Las Vegas teachers union. It was reported that more than a third of the union’s entire $4.1 million annual budget went to pay just nine union leaders ([url]http://www.lvrj.com/news/leaders-of-clark-county-teachers-union-see-big-jump-in-pay-140472673.html[/url]). The Teachers Union Executive Director received $632,546, while the CEO of the union-created Teachers Health Trust was paid $546,133. So next time you hear educators scream “it’s for the kids,” you’ll know the truth. It's for the unions.

    Article number two was about those highly paid Las Vegas firefighters. It turns out they weren’t satisfied with making almost $200,000 per year. They also abused sick leave, rigged work schedules to pump up their pensions, and appear to have engaged in widespread disability fraud ([url]www.lvrj.com/opinion/firefighters-gamed-the-system-again-140473303.html[/url]). Do you understand this kind of abuse is going on across America?

    Article number three was about a now-retired Las Vegas homicide detective and possible police brutality ([url]www.lvrj.com/news/retired-lieutenant-demands-inquiry-into-las-vegas-police-shootings-140467923.html[/url]). It had nothing to do with pensions. But interestingly, the retired homicide detective they quote in the story is 47 years old. He’s 47 and already retired? Want to bet that you and I are on the hook for $5 million to $10 million in pension and health benefits from now until the day he dies — for not working.

    These aren't CEO types. These are average government employees retiring with the equivalent of $5 to $10 million. Do you know any small-business owners who retire with $5 to $10 million? They are few and far between. But that’s exactly what a private-sector employee would need in the bank on the day of his or her retirement to match the $100,000 per year pensions (plus healthcare benefits and cost-of-living increases) of government employees paid out over 30 to 50 years.

    Keep in mind that government employees never risk a dollar of their own money. They have lifetime job security. And they rarely work beyond 9 to 5, let alone weekends or holidays.

    Yet government employees are paid millions by taxpayers to retire early, often on pensions fattened by gaming the corrupt system. This is a national disgrace that is bankrupting America.

    This is the scandal that makes Bernie Madoff look like a small-time crook.

    Wayne Allyn Root is a former Libertarian vice presidential nominee. He now serves as Chairman of the Libertarian National Campaign Committee. Read more reports from Wayne Allyn Root — Click Here Now.

  17. #37
    [QUOTE=chiefst2000;4455854]Please FF there are articles galore here in NY detailing this stuff.

    [url]http://articles.boston.com/2011-10-28/news/30333165_1_disability-cases-pension-and-disability-payments-pension-system[/url]

    [url]http://articles.courant.com/2012-01-24/news/hc-gop-senators-take-overtime-out-of-pension-calculations-20120124_1_pension-calculations-hazardous-duty-employees-hazardous-duty-employees[/url]

    [url]http://www.newsmax.com/WayneAllynRoot/Government-Employee-Scandal-pension/2012/03/05/id/431489[/url]

    [/QUOTE]

    One of those articles was about an out-an-out illegal scam, and none of them show a retired 40 year old sanitation worker getting 70k a year.

    I am just asking him to back up his post.

  18. #38
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    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455797]Can you show me the link where a sanitation worker retired at 40 and make 70k+ in retirement please?

    I'll wait.[/QUOTE]

    In NYC a sanitation worker can retire after 20 years with FULL pension. Why you live in denial here is part of the problem. People simply accept these absurd pensions as normal.

    Google it...NYC sanitation worker can FULLY RETIRE like a cop after only 20 years.


    [url]http://www.businessinsider.com/meet-the-hundreds-of-nyc-sanitation-workers-who-earn-over-100000-2010-12[/url]
    Last edited by southparkcpa; 05-01-2012 at 11:03 AM.

  19. #39
    [QUOTE=southparkcpa;4455869]In NYC a sanitation worker can retire after 20 years with FULL pension. Why you live in denial here is part of the problem. People simply accept these absurd pensions as normal.

    Google it...NYC sanitation worker can FULLY RETIRE like a cop after only 20 years.[/QUOTE]

    let me tell you something...if i had to do it all over again i would have been a cop.

    i dont know any cops that make any less than 100k a year with overtime and now im starting to see my friends retire with 60k a year for life at age 44.

    crazy

  20. #40
    [QUOTE=FF2®;4455864]One of those articles was about an out-an-out illegal scam, and none of them show a retired 40 year old sanitation worker getting 70k a year.

    I am just asking him to back up his post.[/QUOTE]

    I didn't post anything about a 40 yr old sanitation worker though I don't doubt it is true. I posted an article from today discussing a 50 year old toll taker now retired with a 120K per year pension. What say you on that regard?


    Let me guess...Good for him. The system is perfect as it is. Anyone that criticizes it is a racist elitist heartless republican. He worked hard taking tolls his whole life and he had that money coming to him.

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