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Thread: Vrentas Again (46 Defense)

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    Vrentas Again (46 Defense)

    [url]http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2012/05/jets_defensive_line_coach_karl.html[/url]


    Karl Dunbar thinks he has it pretty good in his new gig as the Jets’ defensive line coach.

    He has two first-round picks, a pair of trusty veterans in Sione Pouha and Mike DeVito, and a supporting cast of young linemen with upside. He sees great potential for the Jets to mix up their fronts, moving players into spots where they’ll be most successful and throwing off opponents.

    And one iteration that has Dunbar particularly excited? The 46 defense, invented by Buddy Ryan on the successful 1980s Bears teams and carried on by Rex Ryan. Dunbar said the Jets used the formation “a bunch” last year and plan to use it even more — “as much as we can” — in 2012.

    “We’re going to play a lot of that 46 defense,” Dunbar said with a grin. “You get in that 46 defense, you’re going to get a lot of one-on-one blocks, and when we put athletic guys on the field, bad things happen for the offense.”




    The 46 defense is one variation of a 4-3 front, with four down linemen and eight men in the box. Dunbar has a long history with it, dating back to his days as a defensive lineman for the Arizona Cardinals from 1994-95, when Buddy Ryan was his head coach and Rex was his position coach.

    He can’t wait to coach it here with the Jets, particularly because he feels like it’s a perfect fit for their personnel.

    The Jets have used a base 3-4 front under Ryan, but they’ve always mixed and matched schemes and personnel groupings. They have used many calls with four down linemen and many in the 46 defense.

    Their selection of Quinton Coples, a defensive end out of North Carolina, 16th overall, may allow them to use even more fronts with four down linemen. Dunbar pointed out that the Jets often used four-down fronts last year, but outside linebackers Calvin Pace and Aaron Maybin were at the ends. Now, Coples can be on the edge, with Pouha, Kenrick Ellis or Muhammad Wilkerson inside, he said.


    Star Ledger reporters Discuss the Quarterback Situation and the Jets Running BacksStar Ledger reporters Jenny Vrentas and Conor Orr discuss the quarterback situation and the Jets running backs. Watch video


    The objective will be to put players in spots where they can be most successful, and they’ll be “a little mixture of it all.” And Dunbar believes the plan will include a lot of the 46 defense.

    “As much as our guys do well in it, you’re going to see it,” said Dunbar, who coached stars like Jared Allen, Kevin Williams and Pat Williams in the past six seasons with the Vikings. “We put in the 46 today, and coach was telling the front we still call it the 46 because of his daddy, and we’re going to play it the way his daddy taught it.”

    Dunbar continued to explain: “It’s attack, it’s getting up the field, we’re not holding blocks. Every man for himself, we’re going to get to the quarterback.”

    Dunbar explained that the “bear front” associated with the 46 defense gives offenses fits because the offensive linemen have to block defenders one on one, instead of double teaming or zone blocking. Passes come out more quickly as a result, and if the opponent does look to throw deep, Dunbar said the Jets have an advantage because of their two elite cornerbacks.

    Dunbar believes Coples is “an awesome fit” for the 46 defense. He said Coples could line up as a “3-technique,” which is over the outside shoulder of the guard, or as a defensive end. He also sees Coples used as a “wide nine,” a pure pass-rushing spot outside the tight end.

    When Coples was still on the board in the first round of last month’s draft, Dunbar perked up. Coples’ 6-6, 285-pound frame and 4.7 speed offer a unique skill set, and Dunbar said he didn’t worry about his production dropping from 10 sacks as a junior to 7½ as a senior.

    “I don’t see a problem with that,” Dunbar said. “I saw a great athlete, and he’s going to get a chance to show who he is. From the things I’ve seen in the three days of practice and mini-camp we had, I’m loving every minute.”

    And he’s loving every minute, too, of coaching the 46 defense he once played nearly two decades ago.

    “And it’s still working,” he said. “I think when you’ve got the right pieces of the puzzle in, it’s a great defense.”
    Last edited by KRL; 05-17-2012 at 09:37 AM.

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    [QUOTE=KRL;4470949][url]http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2012/05/jets_defensive_line_coach_karl.html[/url]


    Karl Dunbar thinks he has it pretty good in his new gig as the Jets’ defensive line coach.

    He has two first-round picks, a pair of trusty veterans in Sione Pouha and Mike DeVito, and a supporting cast of young linemen with upside. He sees great potential for the Jets to mix up their fronts, moving players into spots where they’ll be most successful and throwing off opponents.

    And one iteration that has Dunbar particularly excited? The 46 defense, invented by Buddy Ryan on the successful 1980s Bears teams and carried on by Rex Ryan. Dunbar said the Jets used the formation “a bunch” last year and plan to use it even more — “as much as we can” — in 2012.

    “We’re going to play a lot of that 46 defense,” Dunbar said with a grin. “You get in that 46 defense, you’re going to get a lot of one-on-one blocks, and when we put athletic guys on the field, bad things happen for the offense.”




    The 46 defense is one variation of a 4-3 front, with four down linemen and eight men in the box. Dunbar has a long history with it, dating back to his days as a defensive lineman for the Arizona Cardinals from 1994-95, when Buddy Ryan was his head coach and Rex was his position coach.

    He can’t wait to coach it here with the Jets, particularly because he feels like it’s a perfect fit for their personnel.

    The Jets have used a base 3-4 front under Ryan, but they’ve always mixed and matched schemes and personnel groupings. They have used many calls with four down linemen and many in the 46 defense.

    Their selection of Quinton Coples, a defensive end out of North Carolina, 16th overall, may allow them to use even more fronts with four down linemen. Dunbar pointed out that the Jets often used four-down fronts last year, but outside linebackers Calvin Pace and Aaron Maybin were at the ends. Now, Coples can be on the edge, with Pouha, Kenrick Ellis or Muhammad Wilkerson inside, he said.


    Star Ledger reporters Discuss the Quarterback Situation and the Jets Running BacksStar Ledger reporters Jenny Vrentas and Conor Orr discuss the quarterback situation and the Jets running backs. Watch video


    The objective will be to put players in spots where they can be most successful, and they’ll be “a little mixture of it all.” And Dunbar believes the plan will include a lot of the 46 defense.

    “As much as our guys do well in it, you’re going to see it,” said Dunbar, who coached stars like Jared Allen, Kevin Williams and Pat Williams in the past six seasons with the Vikings. “We put in the 46 today, and coach was telling the front we still call it the 46 because of his daddy, and we’re going to play it the way his daddy taught it.”

    Dunbar continued to explain: “It’s attack, it’s getting up the field, we’re not holding blocks. Every man for himself, we’re going to get to the quarterback.”

    Dunbar explained that the “bear front” associated with the 46 defense gives offenses fits because the offensive linemen have to block defenders one on one, instead of double teaming or zone blocking. Passes come out more quickly as a result, and if the opponent does look to throw deep, Dunbar said the Jets have an advantage because of their two elite cornerbacks.

    Dunbar believes Coples is “an awesome fit” for the 46 defense. He said Coples could line up as a “3-technique,” which is over the outside shoulder of the guard, or as a defensive end. He also sees Coples used as a “wide nine,” a pure pass-rushing spot outside the tight end.

    When Coples was still on the board in the first round of last month’s draft, Dunbar perked up. Coples’ 6-6, 285-pound frame and 4.7 speed offer a unique skill set, and Dunbar said he didn’t worry about his production dropping from 10 sacks as a junior to 7½ as a senior.

    “I don’t see a problem with that,” Dunbar said. “I saw a great athlete, and he’s going to get a chance to show who he is. From the things I’ve seen in the three days of practice and mini-camp we had, I’m loving every minute.”

    And he’s loving every minute, too, of coaching the 46 defense he once played nearly two decades ago.

    “And it’s still working,” he said. “I think when you’ve got the right pieces of the puzzle in, it’s
    a great defense.”[/QUOTE]
    [B]Thanks for posting, enjoyed reading that![/B]

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    Great read. Thanks.
    The only issue with the Jets version, we don't have any LB's that can cover. We have zero pass rushers on the d line.

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    nice article, vrentas is a superstar reporter, has good info and writes interesting articles without dick semen-i's snarkiness and manish's rumor-mongoring.

    this philsophy puts the coples pick in better context. would definitely expect to see more 4man fronts.

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    [QUOTE=srobjets;4470963]Great read. Thanks.
    The only issue with the Jets version, we don't have any LB's that can cover. We have zero pass rushers on the d line.[/QUOTE]

    that's why they drafted davis, and antonio allen may be 3rd safety/hybrid LB on pass plays too. Coples was added a pash rusher off the d-line.

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    Hiring Dunbar was huge.
    We needed a real DL coach to help out all the young talent we have.
    I believe this may be one of our biggest off season moves that will pay dividends

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    As usual Jenny writes an informative article.

    I am a big Dunbar fan. I think he the DL is going to be a buge strength this year.

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    Nice job, Jenny.

    This chick makes our guy reporters seem like... well, a bunch of chicks :eek::P;)

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    [QUOTE=KRL;4470949][url]http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/2012/05/jets_defensive_line_coach_karl.html[/url]


    Karl Dunbar thinks he has it pretty good in his new gig as the Jets’ defensive line coach.

    He has two first-round picks, a pair of trusty veterans in Sione Pouha and Mike DeVito, and a supporting cast of young linemen with upside. He sees great potential for the Jets to mix up their fronts, moving players into spots where they’ll be most successful and throwing off opponents.

    And one iteration that has Dunbar particularly excited? The 46 defense, invented by Buddy Ryan on the successful 1980s Bears teams and carried on by Rex Ryan. Dunbar said the Jets used the formation “a bunch” last year and plan to use it even more — “as much as we can” — in 2012.

    “We’re going to play a lot of that 46 defense,” Dunbar said with a grin. “You get in that 46 defense, you’re going to get a lot of one-on-one blocks, and when we put athletic guys on the field, bad things happen for the offense.”




    The 46 defense is one variation of a 4-3 front, with four down linemen and eight men in the box. Dunbar has a long history with it, dating back to his days as a defensive lineman for the Arizona Cardinals from 1994-95, when Buddy Ryan was his head coach and Rex was his position coach.

    He can’t wait to coach it here with the Jets, particularly because he feels like it’s a perfect fit for their personnel.

    The Jets have used a base 3-4 front under Ryan, but they’ve always mixed and matched schemes and personnel groupings. They have used many calls with four down linemen and many in the 46 defense.

    Their selection of Quinton Coples, a defensive end out of North Carolina, 16th overall, may allow them to use even more fronts with four down linemen. Dunbar pointed out that the Jets often used four-down fronts last year, but outside linebackers Calvin Pace and Aaron Maybin were at the ends. Now, Coples can be on the edge, with Pouha, Kenrick Ellis or Muhammad Wilkerson inside, he said.


    Star Ledger reporters Discuss the Quarterback Situation and the Jets Running BacksStar Ledger reporters Jenny Vrentas and Conor Orr discuss the quarterback situation and the Jets running backs. Watch video


    The objective will be to put players in spots where they can be most successful, and they’ll be “a little mixture of it all.” And Dunbar believes the plan will include a lot of the 46 defense.

    “As much as our guys do well in it, you’re going to see it,” said Dunbar, who coached stars like Jared Allen, Kevin Williams and Pat Williams in the past six seasons with the Vikings. “We put in the 46 today, and coach was telling the front we still call it the 46 because of his daddy, and we’re going to play it the way his daddy taught it.”

    Dunbar continued to explain: “It’s attack, it’s getting up the field, we’re not holding blocks. Every man for himself, we’re going to get to the quarterback.”

    Dunbar explained that the “bear front” associated with the 46 defense gives offenses fits because the offensive linemen have to block defenders one on one, instead of double teaming or zone blocking. Passes come out more quickly as a result, and if the opponent does look to throw deep, Dunbar said the Jets have an advantage because of their two elite cornerbacks.

    Dunbar believes Coples is “an awesome fit” for the 46 defense. He said Coples could line up as a “3-technique,” which is over the outside shoulder of the guard, or as a defensive end. He also sees Coples used as a “wide nine,” a pure pass-rushing spot outside the tight end.

    When Coples was still on the board in the first round of last month’s draft, Dunbar perked up. Coples’ 6-6, 285-pound frame and 4.7 speed offer a unique skill set, and Dunbar said he didn’t worry about his production dropping from 10 sacks as a junior to 7½ as a senior.

    “I don’t see a problem with that,” Dunbar said. “I saw a great athlete, and he’s going to get a chance to show who he is. From the things I’ve seen in the three days of practice and mini-camp we had, I’m loving every minute.”

    And he’s loving every minute, too, of coaching the 46 defense he once played nearly two decades ago.

    “And it’s still working,” he said. “I think when you’ve got the right pieces of the puzzle in, it’s a great defense.”[/QUOTE]

    good article. thanks for posting. I know im prob going to get flamed but what is the difference between 46 and playing a safety in the box? the concept of a 46 defense confuses me.

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    [QUOTE=dmitexxi;4471017]good article. thanks for posting. I know im prob going to get flamed but what is the difference between 46 and playing a safety in the box? the concept of a 46 defense confuses me.[/QUOTE]

    That's basically it, but you shift both of your OLB to the strong side and shift the DL to weak side where the DE is lined up way outside isolating the OT. The SS is in the box on the weak side. Then anywhere from 5-8 guys rush the passer. Couldn't pull it off without Revis and Cro. playing man on the outside.

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    [QUOTE=JetPotato;4471039]That's basically it, but you shift both of your OLB to the strong side and shift the DL to weak side where the DE is lined up way outside isolating the OT. The SS is in the box on the weak side. Then anywhere from 5-8 guys rush the passer.[/QUOTE]

    Got it, thanks dude

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    omgomgomgomgomg

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    [QUOTE=dmitexxi;4471017]good article. thanks for posting. I know im prob going to get flamed but what is the difference between 46 and playing a safety in the box? the concept of a 46 defense confuses me.[/QUOTE]

    Any real football question is welcomed, here's a link on the 46 defense

    [url]http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/11/guide-to-n-f-l-defenses-part-6-the-46-defense/[/url]

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    Vrentas is better then all of the other folks by miles...

    Thank you for posting

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    [QUOTE=KRL;4471065]Any real football question is welcomed, here's a link on the 46 defense

    [url]http://fifthdown.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/11/guide-to-n-f-l-defenses-part-6-the-46-defense/[/url][/QUOTE]

    awesome read. Thanks dude.

    so Quinton is moving to the right side of the line right? and its the SS role to seal the edge as he rushes the QB?

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    I loved that article and makes me feel a lot better about the Coples pick. I didn't hate the player picked but thought Ingram was a better fit for the D we play. More 4 man fronts is just fine with me.

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    Im the same boat with you fish. I wanted Ingram but reading that article im feeling good about the Quinton pick. Seems the biggest weakness of the 46 was a weak secondary which is our strength.

    Very excited to see this defense.

    Hoping the offensive side of the ball improves.

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    I look for our DBs to have a ton of interceptions out of the 46. When we bring a heavy blitz outta 46 Revis and Cro both will be jumping the short routes because QBs simply won't have time for nothing but 3 step drops

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=JetPotato;4471015]Nice job, Jenny. This chick makes our guy reporters seem like... well, a bunch of chicks[/QUOTE]


    +1.

    I like Jenny & JI's Chris Nimbley articles. Well articulated and no negative personal spins clouding up the facts. Great job & hope they both keep up the good work.

    :cool:

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=srobjets;4470963]Great read. Thanks.
    The only issue with the Jets version, we don't have any LB's that can cover. [B]We have zero pass rushers on the d line[/B].[/QUOTE]
    Why did we draft Coples? :confused:

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