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Thread: ****ing Verizon.....[Warning: cane_shaking inside]

  1. #1
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    ****ing Verizon.....[Warning: cane_shaking inside]

    In case you haven't heard yet....Verizon’s ‘share everything’ plan….which apparently includes you sharing more of your money with them…:mad:


    [url]http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_20842523/wolverton-beware-verizon-new-service-plan-wireless-data-consumers[/url]


    Beware of Verizon's new service plans

    By Troy Wolverton
    Mercury News Columnist
    Posted: 06/12/2012 05:31:42 PM PDT
    Updated: 06/13/2012 04:06:06 AM PDT


    Jun 12:
    Verizon radically revamps pricing plans for shared data usage in nod to tablets
    The new Share Everything plans Verizon Wireless announced Tuesday have a catchy name and a cool concept -- but they're a crummy deal for many consumers.
    That's because many users will end up paying more for their service under the new plans. Hardest hit will be some of those who put the least burdens on Verizon's network -- those who do little talking, texting or Web surfing on their phones. But more active users may see their bills go up as well.
    Overall, the move appears to be a price hike tarted up to look consumer friendly.
    The new plans, which will go into effect later this month, are undeniably simpler than what consumers have had to contend with in the past. Most consumers have had to choose from a complicated array of options, customizing their plans based on how many phones they had, how much they talk on them, how many text messages they send and how much data -- if any -- they use. Tablet or laptops that customers wanted to connect to the service had their own, separate plans.
    The Share Everything plans streamline these choices. All customers will get unlimited voice minutes and be able to send an unlimited number of text and multimedia messages. Customers buy buckets of data bandwidth that they can share among up to 10 different devices. They can even use their phone or tablet as a mobile hotspot at no extra charge. The only real choices come in how many and what kinds of devices you want to connect to the service and in
    how much data you plan to use.
    As the number of wireless broadband devices in consumers' homes has proliferated, the idea of allowing those gadgets to share their wireless data has gained increasing attention. It makes a lot of sense to allow consumers to use their wireless devices much as they do those that are connected to the wired Internet.
    But under Verizon's plans, be prepared to pay for that simplicity.
    Let's say that you have a smartphone that you use lightly and have signed up for one of Verizon's lower cost plans. You might spend $70 a month if you don't do any messaging or $80 a month if you send or receive up to 1,000 messages.
    Under the Share Everything plans, you'd be spending at least $90 -- and that's for only 1 gigabyte of data, compared to 2 gigabytes under the old rates. If you wanted the same 2 gigabytes of data, you'd be spending $100.
    Now, let's say you have a family plan with three smartphones, again assuming light usage. Under the old rate structure, you might be paying $170 without any messaging and about $190 with 1,000 messages for each phone.
    Under the new plans, you'd have to spend $200 to get the same aggregate amount of data -- 6 gigabytes -- that you got under the old plan.
    One reason the new plans will be more pricey for many consumers is that Verizon has greatly increased the prices it charges for data -- up to twice as much in some cases.
    Verizon and the other wireless carriers have long complained about the stress they are under to keep up with the growing use of data on their networks. Citing those difficulties, it and other carriers over the past couple of years have discontinued their unlimited data plans.
    That was unfortunate for consumers; this is even worse.
    Doubling the cost of data is both outrageous and unwise. Data-hungry smartphones may be putting stresses on carriers' networks, but they've also lured in many new customers and given the carriers a new stream of revenue from data sales to shore up their crumbling voice and messaging businesses. Jacking up prices so dramatically at a time when consumers are becoming increasingly dependent on wireless broadband smacks of profiteering. The rate hikes are sure to make consumers closely monitor their usage, which will likely stifle innovation, decrease adoption and eventually cut into Verizon's own revenue.
    The rate-hike on data might be defensible if Verizon were offering a corresponding cut in voice and text prices. But at least for those on lower-end plans, it's not.
    Verizon spokeswoman Heidi Flato noted that the new plans do offer consumers many more minutes and messages than previous plans and will offer a price break to some consumers.
    "Nearly all customers will receive more value when they move to Share Everything Plans," she said.
    But all those additional minutes and messages likely won't mean much to you. According to the wireless industry's own figures, the average number of voice minutes that consumers use has been falling for years. And the number of messages that consumers send has started to drop as well. So Verizon's new plans will effectively make many consumers pay as much or more for services that they are already using less.
    To be sure, the new Share Everything plans aren't all bad. They certainly are easier to understand. Consumers who spend a lot of time talking on their wireless phones or send thousands of messages or who have many different wireless devices will likely see a price break.
    Best of all, existing Verizon customers can keep their old plans, at least for now. That's good, because many will likely be better off if they do.

  2. #2
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    as usual I find myself confuddled

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    [QUOTE=jetswin;4490825]as usual I find myself confuddled[/QUOTE]


    pfft well we know you can afford it, Mr. Harvey Cedars :rolleyes:
    Just pipe down and shake your cane with me.



    [url]http://www.publicknowledge.org/blog/less-1-year-verizon-data-goes-30unlimited-501[/url]


    Let’s look at the numbers. Imagine that you want a new smartphone plan. You use it for phone calls and for text messaging, but most of your use is mobile data. You may not need to imagine too hard, since that is how consumer behavior has been evolving for a few years.

    A year ago, you probably would have chosen the 450 voice minute option ($39.99), the 250 text message option ($4.99), and the unlimited data option ($30). That’s $75 for more talk and text than you need (but the least you could buy) plus unlimited data.

    Fast forward to today. With Verizon’s price structure today, you would probably choose the 450 voice minute option again ($39.99), the 1000 text message bucket ($10 - Verizon eliminated its lower buckets so you have to pay for more messages even if you do not need them), and 2GB of data ($30 - sorry, Verizon eliminated unlimited data in 2011). That’s $80 for more talk and text than you need plus 2GB of data.

    And what happens at the end of this month? If you are still someone who uses a moderate amount of voice minutes and text messages but mostly uses data, get ready to pay more for less.

    The good news: $40 will now buy you an unlimited amount of voice calls and text messages. That is $10 less than you were paying for your voice and text plans combined before, so even if you don’t plan on increasing your voice calling or texting you come out ahead.

    The bad news: you might need those voice minutes and text messages because data just got a lot more expensive. The cheapest data option will let you pay $50 for 1 GB of data (according to Verizon's calculations, that's about 30 minutes of streaming video for the month). To replicate the amount of data you can buy today you need to pay $60 for 2 GB (which will give you an hour of streaming video, but then you can't use your phone for anything else until the next month).

    Where does that leave you? The cheapest option Verizon now offers smartphone customers is $90 for half as much data as $80 buys you today. And in less than 12 months $30 has gone from buying you unlimited data to not even covering 1 GB.

    This is just the latest example of wireless carriers increasing costs for consumers under the pretext of doing them a favor. There does not appear to be very much competitive pressure keeping carriers from raising prices for customers – which is part of the reason that we are against even more consolidation in the market.



    [SIZE="7"][B][I][U]:SHAKES_MOTHER_UCKFING_CANE!!!:[/U][/I][/B][/SIZE]



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    ok, what if I have four smartphones on my plan? Will that come out better?

    ...and Harvey Ceders is so 2007 :D

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    [QUOTE=Fishooked;4490820]In case you haven't heard yet....Verizon’s ‘share everything’ plan….which apparently includes you sharing more of your money with them…:mad:


    [url]http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_20842523/wolverton-beware-verizon-new-service-plan-wireless-data-consumers[/url]


    Beware of Verizon's new service plans

    By Troy Wolverton
    Mercury News Columnist
    Posted: 06/12/2012 05:31:42 PM PDT
    Updated: 06/13/2012 04:06:06 AM PDT


    Jun 12:
    Verizon radically revamps pricing plans for shared data usage in nod to tablets
    The new Share Everything plans Verizon Wireless announced Tuesday have a catchy name and a cool concept -- but they're a crummy deal for many consumers.
    That's because many users will end up paying more for their service under the new plans. Hardest hit will be some of those who put the least burdens on Verizon's network -- those who do little talking, texting or Web surfing on their phones. But more active users may see their bills go up as well.
    Overall, the move appears to be a price hike tarted up to look consumer friendly.
    The new plans, which will go into effect later this month, are undeniably simpler than what consumers have had to contend with in the past. Most consumers have had to choose from a complicated array of options, customizing their plans based on how many phones they had, how much they talk on them, how many text messages they send and how much data -- if any -- they use. Tablet or laptops that customers wanted to connect to the service had their own, separate plans.
    The Share Everything plans streamline these choices. All customers will get unlimited voice minutes and be able to send an unlimited number of text and multimedia messages. Customers buy buckets of data bandwidth that they can share among up to 10 different devices. They can even use their phone or tablet as a mobile hotspot at no extra charge. The only real choices come in how many and what kinds of devices you want to connect to the service and in
    how much data you plan to use.
    As the number of wireless broadband devices in consumers' homes has proliferated, the idea of allowing those gadgets to share their wireless data has gained increasing attention. It makes a lot of sense to allow consumers to use their wireless devices much as they do those that are connected to the wired Internet.
    But under Verizon's plans, be prepared to pay for that simplicity.
    Let's say that you have a smartphone that you use lightly and have signed up for one of Verizon's lower cost plans. You might spend $70 a month if you don't do any messaging or $80 a month if you send or receive up to 1,000 messages.
    Under the Share Everything plans, you'd be spending at least $90 -- and that's for only 1 gigabyte of data, compared to 2 gigabytes under the old rates. If you wanted the same 2 gigabytes of data, you'd be spending $100.
    Now, let's say you have a family plan with three smartphones, again assuming light usage. Under the old rate structure, you might be paying $170 without any messaging and about $190 with 1,000 messages for each phone.
    Under the new plans, you'd have to spend $200 to get the same aggregate amount of data -- 6 gigabytes -- that you got under the old plan.
    One reason the new plans will be more pricey for many consumers is that Verizon has greatly increased the prices it charges for data -- up to twice as much in some cases.
    Verizon and the other wireless carriers have long complained about the stress they are under to keep up with the growing use of data on their networks. Citing those difficulties, it and other carriers over the past couple of years have discontinued their unlimited data plans.
    That was unfortunate for consumers; this is even worse.
    Doubling the cost of data is both outrageous and unwise. Data-hungry smartphones may be putting stresses on carriers' networks, but they've also lured in many new customers and given the carriers a new stream of revenue from data sales to shore up their crumbling voice and messaging businesses. Jacking up prices so dramatically at a time when consumers are becoming increasingly dependent on wireless broadband smacks of profiteering. The rate hikes are sure to make consumers closely monitor their usage, which will likely stifle innovation, decrease adoption and eventually cut into Verizon's own revenue.
    The rate-hike on data might be defensible if Verizon were offering a corresponding cut in voice and text prices. But at least for those on lower-end plans, it's not.
    Verizon spokeswoman Heidi Flato noted that the new plans do offer consumers many more minutes and messages than previous plans and will offer a price break to some consumers.
    "Nearly all customers will receive more value when they move to Share Everything Plans," she said.
    But all those additional minutes and messages likely won't mean much to you. According to the wireless industry's own figures, the average number of voice minutes that consumers use has been falling for years. And the number of messages that consumers send has started to drop as well. So Verizon's new plans will effectively make many consumers pay as much or more for services that they are already using less.
    To be sure, the new Share Everything plans aren't all bad. They certainly are easier to understand. Consumers who spend a lot of time talking on their wireless phones or send thousands of messages or who have many different wireless devices will likely see a price break.
    Best of all, existing Verizon customers can keep their old plans, at least for now. That's good, because many will likely be better off if they do.[/QUOTE]

    Robert Wagner will send you a free DVD about reverse mortgages, though frankly... it may all seem just a little confusing.


    -

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    [QUOTE=jetswin;4490845]ok, what if I have four smartphones on my plan? Will that come out better?

    ...and Harvey Ceders is so 2007 :D[/QUOTE]


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    The Journal had a good write-up on this today>

    [URL="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303901504577462241394886300.html"]http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303901504577462241394886300.html[/URL]

    [QUOTE]
    By ANTON TROIANOVSKI and THOMAS GRYTA
    After years of waging a price war, the largest U.S. wireless carriers have reversed course and are adopting a series of changes that in many cases raise costs and reduce consumers' options.

    Verizon Wireless lifted the curtain on its long-awaited shared-data plans that allow users to put additional devices under one umbrella. The latest move came Tuesday, when Verizon Wireless introduced its biggest overhaul of pricing in years with plans that let customers share data allotments among as many as 10 devices under a single account.

    The approach could save heavy users money as they attach phones, tablets and laptops to Verizon's network. But it also does away with the carrier's cheapest plans for new smartphone customers and pressures subscribers to give up their unlimited data packages when they upgrade to new phones.

    AT&T Inc. T +0.09%has signaled its interest in similar plans and is expected to follow Verizon's lead. The shift follows other steps in which carriers imposed higher costs or restrictive conditions on their subscribers, including longer waiting periods before they can trade up to new phones and fees for those upgrades.

    "Verizon's pricing that they announced this morning is exactly what we have been kind of signaling in the marketplace for the last couple of weeks," AT&T Chief Executive Randall Stephenson said at an event in Washington on Tuesday.

    The carriers are responding to the sea change in their industry's economics brought about by smartphones, especially Apple Inc.'s AAPL -0.43%iPhone.

    Carriers are paying heavily to subsidize these devices, which in turn have users relying more on services like email, Facebook and Twitter at the expense of voice calling and texts—the industry's longtime cash cow. The surge in wireless data use also has forced the carriers to invest billions of dollars in expensive new networks.

    Carriers' success in pushing through new costs for consumers underscores the heightened pricing power of the biggest phone companies in an increasingly concentrated industry, where Verizon and AT&T account for roughly two-thirds of subscribers and the bulk of the profits.

    Regulators have expressed growing concerns about concentration in the wireless industry, shooting down AT&T's proposed $39 billion takeover of T-Mobile USA because of worries that further consolidation could lead to higher prices.

    On Tuesday, some customers voiced disappointment that Verizon wasn't making smartphone ownership more affordable. Bryan Hill, a stay-at-home dad in the Pittsburgh area, said he hoped the new plans would allow him to afford smartphones for himself and his 11-year-old daughter.

    "I was figuring it would be a way that we could affordably do it and share the data among several devices," Mr. Hill said. "It's still unachievable for a budget-conscious person to jump onto the smartphone bandwagon."

    Wall Street, however, has applauded the new fees and price increases, which have come after years of price wars. In a recent note to clients, Credit Suisse analyst Jonathan Chaplin said U.S. carriers were doing a good job of signaling and following each other's price increases.

    "We're finally seeing the carriers say, 'Enough!' " Mr. Chaplin said in an interview. "They all seem to be focused on the same objective—not beating each other up but extracting value from their existing base."

    Verizon's new approach to pricing essentially reverses the proportions of its bills to better reflect the way people actually use their phones. Voice and text fees now account for around two-thirds of subscribers' bills, with the rest accounted for by data service that covers activities like surfing the Web and listening to streaming music.

    For new customers, Verizon is flipping that arrangement around with plans that charge flat rates for voice and text while shifting the bulk of the monthly bill to data use. For an iPhone user, a package of unlimited voice and text service will drop to $40 a month from $90, but the price of 2 gigabytes of data will jump to $60 from $30.

    "I really look at it as simplifying the voice tiers and giving customers less things to have to choose from," said Tami Erwin, chief marketing officer for Verizon Wireless.

    Customers who pay the carrier for unlimited voice and text will save money. But for some budget-conscious smartphone users, the new plans will amount to a hefty price increase. New customers, for example, won't be able to save money by limiting the number of voice minutes they use or text messages that they send. The new plans force them to buy those services whether they need them or not.

    The cheapest option for a new Verizon smartphone customer today costs $70 a month, covering 450 voice minutes, 2 gigabytes of data and no text messages. After the new plans take effect on June 28, that option will disappear for new customers, who will pay $100 a month to get 2 gigabytes of data, along with unlimited voice and text.

    Existing customers can keep their current plans, with one exception. Users on unlimited data plans will face a tough choice the next time they upgrade their phones: Pay the full price of the upgrade—typically hundreds of dollars more than the subsidized price—or drop the unlimited plan.

    Analysts now expect AT&T to follow Verizon's move to implement shared data plans. AT&T declined to comment.

    In an unusual series of public remarks over the last year, both carriers said they were preparing to institute those plans. Unlike past pricing changes, executives from both carriers didn't hold their plans close to the vest but instead gave the public—and each other—a window into strategic discussions.

    That's a big change from just two years ago, when wireless carriers were slashing the price of voice calling with little warning to their competitors. On the morning of Jan. 15, 2010, Verizon said it would drop the cost of its unlimited calling plan by 30% to $70 a month. AT&T followed suit later in the day with a similar decrease.

    "We were always very tight-lipped on any pricing changes we were going to make," said Denny Strigl, the retired president of Verizon Wireless majority owner Verizon Communications Inc. But now, he said, "the carriers are probably concerned and hoping that if they raise prices the other guy will, too."

    The smaller national carriers, Sprint Nextel Corp. S +0.68%and T-Mobile USA, haven't said they plan to emulate Verizon's shared data plans and have criticized such plans as too complicated and bad for consumers.

    Pushing prices higher is now especially important for carriers. Verizon was able to post big gains in wireless service revenue over the past five years even as its average revenue per retail user grew slowly—to $53.66 a month in the first quarter of 2012 from $50.73 in the first quarter of 2007—thanks to big gains in its customer base.

    But that growth is unlikely now that the U.S. market has become saturated, with more than one wireless device for every person.

    Verizon is also hoping shared-data plans convince subscribers to connect more devices to its network and pay more for service.

    Wireless carriers have worked for the past few years to boost their data revenue. The first step came as both Verizon and AT&T eliminated unlimited data plans for new customers. Meanwhile, carriers including Sprint, S +0.68%MetroPCS Communications PCS -1.74%and AT&T have raised the prices they charge for data.

    Carriers have also looked to reduce how much they're spending to subsidize smartphones for contract customers, in part by trying to limit how often people upgrade to new devices. In recent months, Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint all added fees for customers upgrading to a new phone.

    "This is an unusual case where the pricing moves that the players are making are not about trying to get unilateral advantage so much as they are trying to put the industry on a sustainable, long-term footing," Bernstein Research analyst Craig Moffett said.

    What the Changes Mean for You
    Verizon's new wireless plans will require customers to study their current bills and study the new options to decide whether they should switch. Here are some common questions and answers:

    Q: What are the main changes?

    A: Verizon is eliminating voice and texting options. All customers will get unlimited calling and texting each month. Instead, users will pay between $50 and $100 for a bucket of wireless data they use each month and a monthly fee for each device on the plan.

    Q: What does it cost to add a second phone or a tablet?

    A: Verizon allows up to 10 devices on each plan. The monthly cost of each device varies: $40 for a smartphone; $30 for a feature phone; $20 for a laptop or USB stick; $10 for a tablet computer.

    Q: Will it cost more or less?

    A: It depends. Customers with the cheapest smartphone plans would pay more, but bills for Verizon customers already paying for unlimited voice and text would decline.

    Q: When do the changes start?

    A: The plans are available—and mandatory for new customers—starting June 28.

    Q: Can I keep my current plan?

    A: Existing Verizon customers who are on a tiered data plan (say, $30 for 2 gigabytes) will be able to keep their plan.

    Q: What about unlimited data?

    A: Customers with unlimited data can keep their plan if they don't change phones. After June 28, they must pay full retail price when they upgrade to a new phone (i.e. $649 for an iPhone 4S) to keep their plans.

    Q: What happens if I go over my monthly bucket of data?

    A: The monthly plans begin at $50 for 1 gigabyte and range up to 10 gigabytes for $100. The fee for going over the limit is $15 per gigabyte.

    Q: Can I put a limit on how much data are used by the different devices on my plan?

    A:Yes. If you want to make sure your son's online video habit doesn't blow through your family's data allotment in the first week of the month,Verizon will let you set a cap on how much data each gets to use. The limits cost $4.99 per device per month.

    Q: Why is Verizon doing this?

    A: The U.S. wireless market is saturated and after years of competing on costs, wireless carriers are now trying to boost revenue by charging customers more for their data use. They're also trying to convince consumers to connect more devices to the wireless network.

    Q: What are rivals doing?

    A: AT&T has signaled it plans to move towards a similar fee structure. Sprint and T-Mobile USA haven't said they plan to follow suit.

    [/QUOTE]

    This sucks for people like me who have an old crappy T-Mobile phone and a Verizon Ipad. I was hoping to get an Iphone and have both the phone and Ipad on the same plan but that would cost way too much now.
    Last edited by SINYJets; 06-13-2012 at 02:44 PM.

  8. #8
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    Does this have anything to do with TheOatmeal.com?

    And which one should we be more outraged at?

    _

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    [QUOTE=Fishooked;4490853][IMG]http://www.highresolutionpics.info/wp-content/uploads/images/1180-rage-face-png-format_1024x768.jpg[/IMG][IMG]http://www.highresolutionpics.info/wp-content/uploads/images/1180-rage-face-png-format_1024x768.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]

    lol, that's what I thought

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    We can expect a lot more of this, thanks to Obama and his cronies.


    Oh, and :shakescane:

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    [QUOTE=JStokes;4490857]Does this have anything to do with TheOatmeal.com?

    And which one should we be more outraged at?

    _[/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://www.liferayz.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/angry-dark-stare-l.png[/IMG]

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    Our Droid Bionics are set to Wifi for big downloads, so we'll prolly cut the data plan, and email is cheaper than texts. Hopefully, it won't be too bad.

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    [QUOTE=Fishooked;4490872][IMG]http://www.liferayz.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/angry-dark-stare-l.png[/IMG][/QUOTE]

    The red x of failure.

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    [QUOTE=JStokes;4490857]Does this have anything to do with TheOatmeal.com?

    And which one should we be more outraged at?

    _[/QUOTE]

    :D:clapper::D:clapper:

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    [QUOTE=Fishooked;4490820]In case you haven't heard yet....Verizon’s ‘share everything’ plan….which apparently includes you sharing more of your money with them…:mad:
    [/QUOTE]

    Just share that money with them....creatively. :yes:

    [IMG]http://static.fjcdn.com/pictures/Paying_8f3ba9_2058881.jpg[/IMG]

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    A few months ago I looked in to upgrading mine and mrs big l's regular cell phones to smart phones. Two iPhones and an iPad would have run me over $150 a month.

    :shakesgoddamncane:

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    [QUOTE=Owen Reed;4490913]The red x of failure.[/QUOTE]

    Still using Internet Explorer huh? :rolleyes:

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    [QUOTE=jetswin;4490845]ok, what if I have four smartphones on my plan? Will that come out better?

    ...and Harvey Ceders is so 2007 :D[/QUOTE]

    Not by much. You will be saving a little on data...but additional line prices are jacked up. Instead of your primary line + $10 for each additional line, it's a flat $40 for each phone. Your probably paying $120 for data now....for 8 gigs under the new plan you'll pay $90.

    We have 5 on our plan...I added up the gigs used so far, and we are under 3 (I was kind of surprised by that). We will go with 6 gigs, and even then our savings look to be very minimal.

    Through our employer, we get a 19% "access" discount. Under the current plan, that is only the primary line, with others being "additional lines". The $40 per phone charge under the new plan is an access charge...so I hope that discount is applied to all phones.

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