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Thread: Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide'

  1. #41
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4495230]Nice profile, are you a cop?[/QUOTE]

    I already waved you past the checkpoint, move along

    [SIZE=1]your papers are in order[/SIZE]

  2. #42
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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg;4495208]Even poor people are protected under the constitution. You seem very elitist with your posts here.[/QUOTE]


    I am not an elitist. LOL. I am a successful tough guy. LOL.
    I grew up lower middle class and still have those values of morals, ethics and behavior. I was poor but didn't know it.
    My values are the same now that I'm rich. I have many nice things (no plane). But, I still abhor those who break the law. Regardless of wealth or lack of it. The principal difference is the violence prevalent in minority communities and seemingly endorsed by leaders of those communities.

    The principal responsibilty of the government, regardless of the level, is to protect it's citizens. Especially decent, law abiding ones from bad guys.
    I suspect you are a law abiding one. Yet you go to bat for people who would just as soon shoot you. Lib attitude.

  3. #43
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495233]I already waved you past the checkpoint, move along

    [SIZE=1]your papers are in order[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    If you ARE a cop, the thought proceses here must sicken you. I never cease to be surprised at the caasual attitudes toward criminals and potential threats.

  4. #44
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    [QUOTE=palmetto defender;4495449]I am not an elitist. LOL. I am a successful tough guy. LOL.
    I grew up lower middle class and still have those values of morals, ethics and behavior. I was poor but didn't know it.
    My values are the same now that I'm rich. I have many nice things (no plane). But, I still abhor those who break the law. Regardless of wealth or lack of it. The principal difference is the violence prevalent in minority communities and seemingly endorsed by leaders of those communities.

    The principal responsibilty of the government, regardless of the level, is to protect it's citizens. Especially decent, law abiding ones from bad guys.
    I suspect you are a law abiding one. Yet you go to bat for people who would just as soon shoot you. Lib attitude.[/QUOTE]


    LOL. I want the bad guys in jail too. However, there is a process in this nation for that to be carried about. "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" MLK Jr.

  5. #45
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    NSA: It Would Violate Your Privacy to Say if We Spied on You

    [QUOTE]The surveillance experts at the National Security Agency won’t tell two powerful United States Senators how many Americans have had their communications picked up by the agency as part of its sweeping new counterterrorism powers. The reason: it would violate your privacy to say so.

    That claim comes in a short letter sent Monday to civil libertarian Senators Ron Wyden and Mark Udall. The two members of the Senate’s intelligence oversight committee asked the NSA a simple question last month: under the broad powers granted in 2008′s expansion of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, how many persons inside the United States have been spied upon by the NSA?

    The query bounced around the intelligence bureaucracy until it reached I. Charles McCullough, the Inspector General of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the nominal head of the 16 U.S. spy agencies. In a letter acquired by Danger Room, McCullough told the senators that the NSA inspector general “and NSA leadership agreed that an IG review of the sort suggested would itself violate the privacy of U.S. persons,” McCullough wrote.

    “All that Senator Udall and I are asking for is a ballpark estimate of how many Americans have been monitored under this law, and it is disappointing that the Inspectors General cannot provide it,” Wyden told Danger Room on Monday. “If no one will even estimate how many Americans have had their communications collected under this law then it is all the more important that Congress act to close the ‘back door searches’ loophole, to keep the government from searching for Americans’ phone calls and emails without a warrant.”

    What’s more, McCullough argued, giving such a figure of how many Americans were spied on was “beyond the capacity” of the NSA’s in-house watchdog — and to rectify it would require “imped[ing]” the very spy missions that concern Wyden and Udall. “I defer to [the NSA inspector general's] conclusion that obtaining such an estimate was beyond the capacity of his office and dedicating sufficient additional resources would likely impede the NSA’s mission,” McCullough wrote.


    The changes to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in 2008 — which President Obama, then in the Senate, voted for — relaxed the standards under which communications with foreigners that passed through the United States could be collected by the spy agency. The NSA, for instance, no longer requires probable cause to intercept a person’s phone calls, text messages or emails within the United States as long as one party to the communications is “reasonably” believed to be outside the United States.

    The FISA Amendments Act of 2008, as it’s known, legalized an expansive effort under the Bush administration that authorized NSA surveillance on persons inside the United States without a warrant in cases of suspicion of connections to terrorism. As my colleague David Kravets has reported, Wyden has attempted to slow a renewal of the 2008 surveillance authorities making its way through Congress. The House Judiciary Committee is expected to address the FISA Amendments Act on Tuesday, as the 2008 law expires this year.

    Longtime intelligence watchers found the stonewalling of an “entirely legitimate oversight question” to be “disappointing and unsatisfactory,” as Steve Aftergood, a secrecy expert at the Federation of American Scientists told Danger Room.

    “If the FISA Amendments Act is not susceptible to oversight in this way,” Aftergood said, “it should be repealed, not renewed.”

    Even though McCullough said the spy agencies wouldn’t tell the senators how many Americans have been spied upon under the new authorities, he told them he “firmly believe[s] that oversight of intelligence collection is a proper function of an Inspector General. I will continue to work with you and the [Senate intelligence] Committee to identify ways we can enhance our ability to conduct effective oversight.”[/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/06/nsa-spied/[/url]

  6. #46
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    Cop who bragged he 'fried another n-----' admits he falsely busted an S.I. black man

    Abuse of Power....

    [QUOTE]Cop who bragged he 'fried another n-----' admits he falsely busted an S.I. black man to teach him respect for law enforcement

    Michael Daragjati writes in letter to federal judge in his trial for violating Kenrick Gray's civil rights that he wanted victim who was 'rude and disrespectful' to learn a lesson

    THE RACIST NYPD cop who boasted that he had “fried another n-----” now admits he falsely arrested the black man to teach him a lesson.

    Michael Daragjati is scheduled to be sentenced Friday for violating the civil rights of Kenrick Gray after he was stopped and frisked in Staten Island.

    Daragjati explains he fabricated a resisting arrest charge because Gray mouthed off to him. Gray spent two days in jail as a result of the bogus collar.

    “I did so, not because of the color of his skin, but because he was rude and disrespectful to me,” Daragjati wrote in a six-page letter from his jail cell to Brooklyn Federal Judge William Kuntz, who is black and a former member of the Civilian Complaint Review Board.

    “I thought that if he received a (desk appearance ticket and was released) this person wouldn’t have learned a lesson that he should not be disrespectful to law enforcement.”

    The FBI had been probing Daragjati in an unrelated extortion investigation for threatening someone whom he thought had stolen his snowplow. In the course of that investigation, authorities taped Daragjati discussing Gray’s arrest and repeatedly using the N-word.

    “I know that I will never be able to convince the world that I am not a racist,” Daragjati wrote. “I know that I am not . . . . That word was not reserved for people of color, it was used as an ignorant reference to those people in the street because of their conduct and disrespect for the community and members of law enforcement.”

    Four Staten Island cops and two retired sergeants also wrote to the judge praising Daragati’s character and asking for leniency. On the most recent job evaluation before his arrest, Daragjati’s supervisor gave him the top grade for “community interaction.”

    Daragjati, who has been fired from the force as a result of the conviction, vowed that he will never again utter the N-word. He faces up to 57 months in prison for the civil rights and extortion charges he pleaded guilty to this year.

    [email]jmarzulli@nydailynews.com[/email][/QUOTE]

    [url]http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bragged-fried-n-admits-falsely-busted-s-i-black-man-teach-respect-law-enforcement-article-1.1097419#ixzz1yGrnqizl[/url]

    The government should fear the people, not the people fear the government

  7. #47
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    [QUOTE=palmetto defender;4495452]If you ARE a cop, the thought proceses here must sicken you. I never cease to be surprised at the caasual attitudes toward criminals and potential threats.[/QUOTE]

    The "thought" process sickens me anyway especially from people who have them and claim to be ex-cops and ex-military. No difference between Al-Qaeda or any other American enemy and that kind of fifth column AFAIC.

    I can't counter every idiocy I read here - not enough time in the day - it would be faster and easier to kick out every illegal

    Most if not all of the lib pukes here offer no solutions to any problem.

    For example many decry the Patriot Act either aping the odious Dr. Paul or some other social arsonist - but have no solution - they either say the concern is unfounded, prejudicial, or offer some glib non-answer based on platitudes and hypotheticals.

  8. #48
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495524]The "thought" process sickens me anyway especially from people who have them and claim to be ex-cops and ex-military. No difference between Al-Qaeda or any other American enemy and that kind of fifth column AFAIC.

    I can't counter every idiocy I read here - not enough time in the day - it would be faster and easier to kick out every illegal

    Most if not all of the lib pukes here offer no solutions to any problem.

    For example many decry the Patriot Act either aping the odious Dr. Paul or some other social arsonist - but have no solution - they either say the concern is unfounded, prejudicial, or offer some glib non-answer based on platitudes and hypotheticals.[/QUOTE]

    The answer is The Constitution and the Bill Of Rights

  9. #49
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    [QUOTE=Jetdawgg;4495527]The answer is The Constitution and the Bill Of Rights[/QUOTE]

    You wouldn't know the Constitution from a roll of Charmin.

    Let's see you throw away your unearned, undeserved race-baced privileges and then demand them back based on the Bill of Rights or the Constitution - you won't get 'em

  10. #50
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495524]
    For example many decry the Patriot Act either aping the odious Dr. Paul or some other social arsonist - but have no solution - they either say the concern is unfounded, prejudicial, or offer some glib non-answer based on platitudes and hypotheticals.[/QUOTE]

    It's a bad example because the act as it was passed by Congress is meaningless. The way it's interpreted is classified. Those who support it have no idea what they are supporting other than a blank check that may or may not be protecting them or abusing them including members of Congress who extended it without any idea what they were extending.

  11. #51
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4495556]It's a bad example because the act as it was passed by Congress is meaningless. The way it's interpreted is classified. Those who support it have no idea what they are supporting other than a blank check that may or may not be protecting them or abusing them including members of Congress who extended it without any idea what they were extending.[/QUOTE]

    Does terror exist as a political tool?
    If so, let's hear your solution towards terror.
    Not a hoary quotation from Franklin or MLK Jr.
    If the Bible is to be ignored/derided so should they.
    Let's also hear how we are unprotected or at least less so since 9/11.

  12. #52
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495560]Does terror exist as a political tool?
    If so, let's hear your solution towards terror.
    Not a hoary quotation from Franklin or MLK Jr.
    If the Bible is to be ignored/derided so should they.
    Let's also hear how we are unprotected or at least less so since 9/11.[/QUOTE]

    What does that have to do with anything? I have no problem with Congress passing laws and agencies carrying out those laws in ways and means that remain secret in regards to national security. That is very different than agencies creating law that is classified that you support when you don't have a clue what the law actually is and neither does Congress which effectively has happened with the Patriot act.

  13. #53
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4495566]What does that have to do with anything? I have no problem with Congress passing laws and agencies carrying out those laws in ways and means that remain secret in regards to national security. That is very different than agencies creating law that is classified that you support when you don't have a clue what the law actually is and neither does Congress which effectively has happened with the Patriot act.[/QUOTE]

    What do you think is happening.
    Telemarketers? Spam? :dunno:

  14. #54
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495538]You wouldn't know the Constitution from a roll of Charmin.

    Let's see you throw away your unearned, undeserved race-baced privileges and then demand them back based on the Bill of Rights or the Constitution - you won't get 'em[/QUOTE]

    This post is hilarious:D

  15. #55
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4495583]What do you think is happening.
    Telemarketers? Spam? :dunno:[/QUOTE]

    We have a pretty good historical record of what policing without restraint of law leads to, abuse of innocent people far outside the scope of national security.

    We also tend to get blow back by the public and law makers when these abuses come to light which isn't necessarily helpful in maintaining national security.

  16. #56
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    [QUOTE=Winstonbiggs;4495871]We have a pretty good historical record of what policing without restraint of law leads to, abuse of innocent people far outside the scope of national security.

    We also tend to get blow back by the public and law makers when these abuses come to light which isn't necessarily helpful in maintaining national security.[/QUOTE]

    Sorry that's too vague. What is that historical record? The Watergate break-in? :rotfl:

    What abuses have there been? Unravelled turbans? Seized beverage containers?

    B. Husssein hides everything its true. Not even a peek at a dead Bin Laden he, he, I, I, "got"

    More paranoia from the usual suspects - the idiotic intersection of lib street and libertarian avenue

    The difference: You see the invisible SS commandant normal people don't, I see the psycho with the bloodstained dirty nightshirt and scimitar standing in our midst.

  17. #57
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    [QUOTE=Jungle Shift Jet;4496072]Sorry that's too vague. What is that historical record? The Watergate break-in? :rotfl:

    What abuses have there been? Unravelled turbans? Seized beverage containers?

    B. Husssein hides everything its true. Not even a peek at a dead Bin Laden he, he, I, I, "got"

    More paranoia from the usual suspects - the idiotic intersection of lib street and libertarian avenue

    The difference: You see the invisible SS commandant normal people don't, I see the psycho with the bloodstained dirty nightshirt and scimitar standing in our midst.[/QUOTE]

    Your way to smart and have a very solid historical background to post that kind of pure drivel.

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