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Thread: Middle schoolers bully bus monitor, ect

  1. #1

    Middle schoolers bully bus monitor, ect

    Graduation on Thursday 6/21 for my middle school. The graduation was outside the building, where most of the senior teachers, deans and all administrators were attending, some kids got word that administrators and deans were not present in school and all hell broke loose. Awful kids throwing food at the smaller quieter kids in the cafe, others roaming the hallways going into classrooms and punching kids and running, trashing bulletin boards that teachers decorate in hallways with student work. But dont look for this on the news, it'll never make it.

    Found this, hope this is the start of taking back the schools from vicious students who cause grief and rewarding those students who cooperate. I talk to the bus monitors in my school and they get threats on a daily basis. Love that someone recorded this.

    [url]http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/21/us/new-york-bullied-bus-monitor/index.html[/url]

    By Faith Karimi , CNN
    updated 6:55 AM EDT, Fri June 22, 2012

    CNN.com

    On tonight's "AC360˚," Anderson Cooper interviews bus monitor Karen Klein about the verbal abuse she endured, at 8 p.m. and 10p.m. ET.

    (CNN) -- A profanity-laced video of middle school students in upstate New York verbally abusing a bus monitor is sparking an outpouring of support as strangers worldwide rally to her side.

    Students taunted Karen Klein, 68, with a stream of profanity, insults, jeers and physical ridicule. Some boys demanded to know her address, saying they wanted to come to her house and steal from her.

    One comment from a boy aboard the bus was especially painful, she said. He told her that she does not have family because "they all killed themselves because they didn't want to be near you."

    Klein's eldest son took his own life 10 years ago, according to CNN affiliate WHAM.

    The bullying continued unabated for about 10 minutes in the video, as a giggling student jabbed Klein's arm with a book and made fun of her weight.

    Recorded by a student with a cell phone camera Monday, the brazen bullying went viral and spurred international outrage.
    Community reacts to bus monitor bullying
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    Valderrama's anti-bullying campaign

    When a bullied kid grows up

    The incident occurred in Greece, New York, near Rochester. Klein is a bus monitor for the Greece Central School District, and the harassers hail from a district middle school.

    In an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper, Klein said children misbehaved occasionally, but Monday's incident was unlike any other she had experienced.

    Despite the incident, she said she does not believe her harassers are bad kids.

    "Not deep down. But when they get together, things happen," she said.

    As the intimidation unfolded, she tried to disregard the harassment and didn't hear everything that was uttered, she said.

    But she said it hurt deeply.

    At one point, she said, she told two children, "I am a person, too. I shouldn't be treated this way."

    Klein said she kept looking out of the window, counting down the seconds to when the students would get off the bus.

    "It was one of those things, I didn't know what to do," she said.

    No charges have been filed because Klein has decided she does not want to press criminal charges, according to Greece Police Capt. Steve Chatterton.

    He stressed that the investigation is continuing and the bus monitor could change her mind.

    A juvenile must face a felony or misdemeanor to be charged in family court, while harassment only qualifies as a violation, he said.

    Klein told police she didn't hear some of the threats on the video and she would not have felt threatened had she heard them, the police captain said.

    "I've gotten e-mails from the United Kingdom (and) from all over the United States saying prosecute, prosecute," Chatterton said. "I feel it. I feel it. But we have to follow the law. We can't tailor the law to meet this case because of public outrage."

    The police captain said the four students pinpointed in the video, all of them seventh-graders, spoke to police voluntarily and without lawyers present.

    Outrageous moments caught on camera

    "As one father put it, his son is sitting back, waiting for his punishment," Chatterton said. "No one has denied accountability and they've taken responsibility for their actions."

    CNN's "AC360" received statements from two of the accused middle schoolers and the father of a third student apologizing for their behavior.

    "When I saw the video, I was disgusted and could not believe I did that," one boy named Josh said. "I am sorry for being so mean and I will never treat anyone this way again."

    A teen named Wesley said he regretted his actions and "would be really mad" if someone had done the same to a family member.

    "If your friend says to bully somebody, please don't do it," said the father of Luis, another of the seventh-graders. " We apologize to Ms. Klein. We're deeply sorry."

    The video prompted an outpouring of support and a fundraiser by international crowd-funding website indiegogo.com that had gathered more than $450,000 by Friday.

    Indiegogo's Max Sidorov said the video struck a chord with him because he is a bullying victim and the first thing that popped into his mind was to raise money to get her away from the environment.

    "I had no idea I was going to raise anywhere near this amount. I thought maybe a few thousand," Sidorov said from Toronto. "Maybe to send her somewhere nice. But this is enough for her to retire."

    Southwest planned to provide Klein and nine others with an all-expense paid trip to Disneyland in Southern California. Klein said the outpouring of support is overwhelming.

    "I don't feel like I've done anything," she said after learning of the Southwest offer on CNN. "It's awesome."

    The school district said its bullying team and the local police are conducting an investigation.

    "We have discovered other similar videos on YouTube and are working to identify all of the students involved," the school district said.

    Teen says bullies beat him, sues New York schools

    It did not elaborate on whether the additional videos are related to Klein's case, though school officials say they were all apparently posted by the same user.

    "While we cannot comment on specific student discipline, we can say that students found to be involved will face strong disciplinary action," the school district said.

    The students and their family members have received death threats, according to Chatterton.

    "We have custody of one of their cell phones, and he had over 1,000 missed calls and 1,000 text messages threatening him. And he is a 13-year-old," the police captain said. "That must stop."

    Klein said she's not pushing for criminal charges, but wants the boys to be punished.

    She suggested a few disciplinary actions -- such as a ban from the bus and athletic activities or community service. But most of all, the grandmother of eight said she hopes this is the end of it.

    "I want to make sure that they never do this again, to anybody," she said.

    What would you do with a mean kid?

    Gotta watch: Teacher turns table on bully

    CNN's Stephanie Gallman, Darrell Calhoun and Randi Kaye contributed to this report.
    Last edited by copernicus; 06-22-2012 at 10:08 AM.

  2. #2
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    [url]http://www.jetsinsider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=244960[/url]

    ;)

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  4. #4
    This country needs a two-tiered education system. One for students who WANT an education, and one for everyone else. Until education is valued, things are going to progressively get worse.

    I don't know what other countries do, but I know many only have high schools for the "worthy" students. I'm not saying getting into high school should be a lottery, but too many good kids are being brought down by ones who just couldn't care less. And don't talk to me about being a "civilized nation" -- we are no better off having many of these kids "graduate". They're a drain on the system, both intellectually and financially. If we're truly serious about improving education, we have to find a way to filter out the waste . . .

  5. #5
    Would the donations to her produce a tax liability?

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=OCCH;4498266]This country needs a two-tiered education system. One for students who WANT an education, and one for everyone else. Until education is valued, things are going to progressively get worse.

    I don't know what other countries do, but I know many only have high schools for the "worthy" students. I'm not saying getting into high school should be a lottery, but too many good kids are being brought down by ones who just couldn't care less. And don't talk to me about being a "civilized nation" -- we are no better off having many of these kids "graduate". They're a drain on the system, both intellectually and financially. If we're truly serious about improving education, we have to find a way to filter out the waste . . .[/QUOTE]

    I think there is a need for trade schools around the middle school years. Stress core academics up to 6th grade and then let kids get a feel for trade schools in 7th and 8th where academics are still taught but they would be taught relevant to an area of study such as plumbing, electrician, auto mechanics, and possibly even computer technicians and nursing. I think if the kids actually were learning something they felt was relevant then they would be much better behaved.

    Keep the regular schools for professionally minded kids that plan to go to college for things like engineering, the sciences, business, etc. Trying to shoehorn everyone into college prep areas is a disservice.

    The true scum that then try to cause problems should be out of school. Failure needs to be an option both personally and professionally in America again. Sometimes it takes the fear of failure or actually falling flat to get through to someone and get them to be productive.

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=Trades;4498305]I think there is a need for trade schools around the middle school years. Stress core academics up to 6th grade and then let kids get a feel for trade schools in 7th and 8th where academics are still taught but they would be taught relevant to an area of study such as plumbing, electrician, auto mechanics, and possibly even computer technicians and nursing. I think if the kids actually were learning something they felt was relevant then they would be much better behaved.

    Keep the regular schools for professionally minded kids that plan to go to college for things like engineering, the sciences, business, etc. Trying to shoehorn everyone into college prep areas is a disservice.

    The true scum that then try to cause problems should be out of school. Failure needs to be an option both personally and professionally in America again. Sometimes it takes the fear of failure or actually falling flat to get through to someone and get them to be productive.[/QUOTE]

    Ah, yes, the way things were, before good ole George Bush got involved with his No Child Left Behind. No time for shop class now, takes away from preparing for the test$$$$$.

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=copernicus;4498475]Ah, yes, the way things were, before good ole George Bush got involved with his No Child Left Behind. No time for shop class now, takes away from preparing for the test$$$$$.[/QUOTE]

    We have a regional High School that is our Vo-Tech and it is very popular. They actually have nursing and computer tracks in the school as well as shop type classes. Why is it possible in NJ and not NY in NCLB is national? Again I am not defending NCLB as I think it was a mistake also.

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=OCCH;4498266]This country needs a two-tiered education system. One for students who WANT an education, and one for everyone else. Until education is valued, things are going to progressively get worse.

    I don't know what other countries do, but I know many only have high schools for the "worthy" students. I'm not saying getting into high school should be a lottery, but too many good kids are being brought down by ones who just couldn't care less. And don't talk to me about being a "civilized nation" -- we are no better off having many of these kids "graduate". They're a drain on the system, both intellectually and financially. If we're truly serious about improving education, we have to find a way to filter out the waste . . .[/QUOTE]

    A few years back the NYC public school system tried to set up schools to help kids with behavior problems. They were called "700 schools." There was a very high percentage of students who were African American and Latino. Leaders of those communities claimed race was the reason and the schools were quickly a thing of the past.

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=copernicus;4498483]A few years back the NYC public school system tried to set up schools to help kids with behavior problems. They were called "700 schools." There was a very high percentage of students who were African American and Latino. Leaders of those communities claimed race was the reason and the schools were quickly a thing of the past.[/QUOTE]

    PC wins again. "And down goes the US!"

  11. #11
    [QUOTE=Trades;4498481]We have a regional High School that is our Vo-Tech and it is very popular. They actually have nursing and computer tracks in the school as well as shop type classes. Why is it possible in NJ and not NY in NCLB is national? Again I am not defending NCLB as I think it was a mistake also.[/QUOTE]

    Specific schools all over the US can opt out of NCLB, they just lose TONS of money and have to make up for it in other places. Most schools dont and suffer the government's rath..............
    Last edited by copernicus; 06-22-2012 at 02:30 PM.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=copernicus;4498510]Specific schools all over the US can opt out of NCLB, they just lose TONS of money and have to make up for it in other places. Most schools dont and suffer the governments rath..............[/QUOTE]

    Another reason to eliminate the DOE.

  13. #13
    [QUOTE=copernicus;4498483]A few years back the NYC public school system tried to set up schools to help kids with behavior problems. They were called "700 schools." There was a very high percentage of students who were African American and Latino. Leaders of those communities claimed race was the reason and the schools were quickly a thing of the past.[/QUOTE]

    That's why I said we NEED a two-tiered system, but not that we'd ever HAVE one.

    You can complain about the political elite all you want, but your own post proves that it's the communities that won't allow change. They care more about how things are perceived than about whatever good would come from it.

    The sad thing is, the students who would land in the lower tier end up there after high school anyway -- trying to learn a trade or get a job that doesn't rely on having a good education. Why not start early?

    It would be a win/win, both for the "troubled" students, as well as the classmates that would no longer be distracted by them. Sadly, that's not enough incentive to make the change . . .

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=OCCH;4498547]That's why I said we NEED a two-tiered system, but not that we'd ever HAVE one.

    You can complain about the political elite all you want, but your own post proves that it's the communities that won't allow change. They care more about how things are perceived than about whatever good would come from it.

    The sad thing is, the students who would land in the lower tier end up there after high school anyway -- trying to learn a trade or get a job that doesn't rely on having a good education. Why not start early?

    It would be a win/win, both for the "troubled" students, as well as the classmates that would no longer be distracted by them. Sadly, that's not enough incentive to make the change . . .[/QUOTE]

    All of this just proves to me that there is no friggin way I would live in NYC.

  15. #15
    [QUOTE=copernicus;4498483]A few years back the NYC public school system tried to set up schools to help kids with behavior problems. They were called "700 schools." There was a very high percentage of students who were African American and Latino. Leaders of those communities claimed race was the reason and the schools were quickly a thing of the past.[/QUOTE]

    All of this gets solved through Charter Schools and a voucher system. My contention is that the good kids with the most potential need an avenue to get out of the horrible and unsafe schools they are zoned for. Only students or parents that care will bother to apply to these programs. In D.C. the voucher program has been wildly successful. In New Orleans almost the entire school system consists of charters. The beauty of the program is that parents and students get to make the choice. The Charters compete for the business. When the school is subpar people choose to go to a better one. The bad one goes out of business. On vouchers the key is to have income limits for those eligible. They should only cover needy families taking the whole left wing argument that vouchers help rich kids off the table.

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    I'm 26, and I went to a strict private Catholic High School, but grew up in public schools before that.

    Always felt bad for the public school teachers, they had a very short leash when it comes to personal discretion on how to discipline children.

    I was definitely one of the bad kids in class and it was very easy, because I knew exactly how far, not far at all, they could go in discipline.

    In my High School it was a different story - I got suspended pending expulsion about two months into my sophomore year for accumulated demerits.

    But it wasn't even just that the private institution had that ultimate chip - expulsion - which public schools rarely did, private school teachers could defend themselves in class. If someone made fun of the teacher, the teacher would shoot right back and make fun of the kid. That can end sh*t right there most of the time.

    In public schools, god forbid the teacher responded in kind to a kid in that way, they would probably be fired.

    The public education system needs serious reform.

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    We have to start beating the kids again.

  18. #18
    [QUOTE=Ernie;4498282]Would the donations to her produce a tax liability?[/QUOTE]

    Just curious. Any CPA's?

  19. #19
    [QUOTE=Ernie;4498930]Just curious. Any CPA's?[/QUOTE]

    Not taxable to her......

  20. #20
    [QUOTE=brady's a catcher;4498516]Another reason to eliminate the DOE.[/QUOTE]

    Recreated by the Department of Education Organization Act (Public Law 96-88) and signed into law by[COLOR="Red"] President Jimmy Carter[/COLOR] on October 17, 1979, it began operating on May 4, 1980.[2]

    NUFF SAID!!!!
    That to go along with the community "reinvestment act"
    Great man there!!! Just like the one we have now!

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