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Thread: what definds a player

  1. #21
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    The passion with which someone executes whatever job they're assigned is what defines that person.Whither it be a pro athlete,office worker,Grunt or motivational speaker,that passion will ultimately define the person.

  2. #22
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    That was classic gold 32green. I was wrong about Gholston becoming a productive pass rusher, although I was right in regards to the Jets defense being much improved under a defensive minded coach such as Rex (we ranked #1) and was also (some-what) correct on my 10 win prediction. We went 9-7 + 2-1 in the playoffs = 11 wins for the year. ;)

    Back to the topic of discussion. Winning a championship is the ultimate team goal. Players such as Barry Sanders and Dan Marino are two of the greatest players of all-time, but never won a championship. Making it into the Hall of Fame is the ultimate individual goal. Players that make the HOF will always and forever live through Canton, even after they're dead and gone. I'm not sure which is more important to a player, I'm sure that all players feel differently but what I do know is this... Someone such as Eddy Curry just won an NBA Championship eating cheese burgers on the sidelines. Warming the bench. Does that define his bust of an NBA career as being a championship winning player, due to the fact that he'll always and forever have an NBA ring? Mike Miller has an NBA ring. Patrick Ewing has zero. Championships are sometimes overrated in regards to defining a player. Someone such as Kellen Clemens can never make the HOF, but he can win a championship ring due to being a 3rd sting quarterback.

    I would have to say that a HOF induction would defines a player more than championship rings. A HOF induction goes to show that you were a great player. It's an in individual achievement. Winning a championship is an entire team and coaching staff's achievement.

    Barry Sanders never won a ring, Dan Marino never won a ring, but they're still considered as being some of the greatest players that's ever played their respected position. Both are in the hall of fame, and because of that? I'd have to say that a HOF induction defines a great player more than a championship ring.
    Last edited by NY2FLDWC85; 06-28-2012 at 02:20 PM.

  3. #23
    Bewildered Beast
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    [QUOTE=PatsFanTX;4502816]What does "definds" mean?[/QUOTE]

    I think we all know he means "looking backwards"; so we can "find him" again and again.

    Joy, joy!

  4. #24
    [QUOTE=NY2FLDWC85;4502983]That was classic gold 32green. [B]I was wrong about Gholston becoming a productive pass rusher[/B], although I was right in regards to the Jets defense being much improved under a defensive minded coach such as Rex (we ranked #1) and was also (some-what) correct on my 10 win prediction. We went 9-7 + 2-1 in the playoffs = 11 wins for the year. ;)

    Back to the topic of discussion. Winning a championship is the ultimate team goal. Players such as Barry Sanders and Dan Marino are two of the greatest players of all-time, but never won a championship. Making it into the Hall of Fame is the ultimate individual goal. Players that make the HOF will always and forever live through Canton, even after they're dead and gone. I'm not sure which is more important to a player, I'm sure that all players feel differently but what I do know is this... Someone such as Eddy Curry just won an NBA Championship eating cheese burgers on the sidelines. Warming the bench. Does that define his bust of an NBA career as being a championship winning player, due to the fact that he'll always and forever have an NBA ring? Mike Miller has an NBA ring. Patrick Ewing has zero. Championships are sometimes overrated in regards to defining a player. Someone such as Kellen Clemens can never make the HOF, but he can win a championship ring due to being a 3rd sting quarterback.

    I would have to say that a HOF induction would defines a player more than championship rings. A HOF induction goes to show that you were a great player. It's an in individual achievement. Winning a championship is an entire team and coaching staff's achievement.

    Barry Sanders never won a ring, Dan Marino never won a ring, but they're still considered as being some of the greatest players that's ever played their respected position. Both are in the hall of fame, and because of that? I'd have to say that a HOF induction defines a great player more than a championship ring.[/QUOTE]

    I would like to see that analysis. Preferably with stats. Link?
    Last edited by ASG0531; 06-28-2012 at 02:30 PM.

  5. #25
    Bewildered Beast
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    [QUOTE=Yankeejet22;4502842]it obviously means to take away a find.

    eg: "where did you defind that?" This means you never found it, or maybe you shouldn't have looked for it in the first place.
    or
    "I defind this interesting." - which means it perhaps was not interesting at all, or that it is indeed interesting, but you never looked for it.[/QUOTE]:rofl:

    [QUOTE=32green;4502934]Eric Davis and Dave Parker were even more p*ssed.... because she called them "Million dollar *****rs."

    A real hoot, that Jew-hating, racist homophobe.

    I[B] think she posts here as Goering73isgod.
    [/B]


    :dunno:


    -[/QUOTE]
    lmao

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