Page 10 of 41 FirstFirst ... 8910111220 ... LastLast
Results 181 to 200 of 820

Thread: Revisiting Gun Laws in the U.S.

  1. #181
    Watching CNN or FOX (forget which), an Army psychiatrist, teaching at West Point stated this is just the beginning. He was steadfast and somewhat angry.

    "We are raising a generation of kids with no responsibility and allowing them to play games hours a day that glorify killing". Went on to say.."You parents who allow this need to look to yourselves, in fact, you may be the first victim"

    He sounded very reasonable and as I write this I can see his passion is lost but you get the idea.




    My kids are in their 20's and we laugh today about the fact that I would NEVER allow video games in the house.

  2. #182
    All League
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA
    Posts
    3,662
    I get the "emulating video games" argument even though I'm not sure I buy it. In this instance, however, I'm not aware of any games where the target is tiny children.

    Without any further information or evidence, I'm prepared to say that the most devastating factor in all of this is that guy was a fukcing monster.

  3. #183
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    13,865
    Quote Originally Posted by BushyTheBeaver View Post
    I'm not sure that's true.

    Read FSer's posts over the past two days. I read them all. Not a single mention expressing sadness or regret over the murdered children. But post after post of, "You want my guns? Try and take 'em, ****s." Lots of anger, lots of threats to do violence.

    Can't side with sentiments like those. Do you?
    Where are those "threats" exactly?

  4. #184

    NYT OP-ED: Do We Have the Courage to Stop This?

    By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF

    Published: December 15, 2012

    IN the harrowing aftermath of the school shooting in Connecticut, one thought wells in my mind: Why can’t we regulate guns as seriously as we do cars?

    The fundamental reason kids are dying in massacres like this one is not that we have lunatics or criminals — all countries have them — but that we suffer from a political failure to regulate guns.

    Children ages 5 to 14 in America are 13 times as likely to be murdered with guns as children in other industrialized countries, according to David Hemenway, a public health specialist at Harvard who has written an excellent book on gun violence.

    So let’s treat firearms rationally as the center of a public health crisis that claims one life every 20 minutes. The United States realistically isn’t going to ban guns, but we can take steps to reduce the carnage.

    American schoolchildren are protected by building codes that govern stairways and windows. School buses must meet safety standards, and the bus drivers have to pass tests. Cafeteria food is regulated for safety. The only things we seem lax about are the things most likely to kill.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has five pages of regulations about ladders, while federal authorities shrug at serious curbs on firearms. Ladders kill around 300 Americans a year, and guns 30,000.

    We even regulate toy guns, by requiring orange tips — but lawmakers don’t have the gumption to stand up to National Rifle Association extremists and regulate real guns as carefully as we do toys. What do we make of the contrast between heroic teachers who stand up to a gunman and craven, feckless politicians who won’t stand up to the N.R.A.?

    As one of my Facebook followers wrote after I posted about the shooting, “It is more difficult to adopt a pet than it is to buy a gun.”

    Look, I grew up on an Oregon farm where guns were a part of life; and my dad gave me a .22 rifle for my 12th birthday. I understand: shooting is fun! But so is driving, and we accept that we must wear seat belts, use headlights at night, and fill out forms to buy a car. Why can’t we be equally adult about regulating guns?

    And don’t say that it won’t make a difference because crazies will always be able to get a gun. We’re not going to eliminate gun deaths, any more than we have eliminated auto accidents. But if we could reduce gun deaths by one-third, that would be 10,000 lives saved annually.

    Likewise, don’t bother with the argument that if more people carried guns, they would deter shooters or interrupt them. Mass shooters typically kill themselves or are promptly caught, so it’s hard to see what deterrence would be added by having more people pack heat. There have been few if any cases in the United States in which an ordinary citizen with a gun stopped a mass shooting.

    The tragedy isn’t one school shooting, it’s the unceasing toll across our country. More Americans die in gun homicides and suicides in six months than have died in the last 25 years in every terrorist attack and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq combined.

    So what can we do? A starting point would be to limit gun purchases to one a month, to curb gun traffickers. Likewise, we should restrict the sale of high-capacity magazines so that a shooter can’t kill as many people without reloading.

    We should impose a universal background check for gun buyers, even with private sales. Let’s make serial numbers more difficult to erase, and back California in its effort to require that new handguns imprint a microstamp on each shell so that it can be traced back to a particular gun.

    “We’ve endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years,” President Obama noted in a tearful statement on television. He’s right, but the solution isn’t just to mourn the victims — it’s to change our policies. Let’s see leadership on this issue, not just moving speeches.

    Other countries offer a road map. In Australia in 1996, a mass killing of 35 people galvanized the nation’s conservative prime minister to ban certain rapid-fire long guns. The “national firearms agreement,” as it was known, led to the buyback of 650,000 guns and to tighter rules for licensing and safe storage of those remaining in public hands.

    The law did not end gun ownership in Australia. It reduced the number of firearms in private hands by one-fifth, and they were the kinds most likely to be used in mass shootings.

    In the 18 years before the law, Australia suffered 13 mass shootings — but not one in the 14 years after the law took full effect. The murder rate with firearms has dropped by more than 40 percent, according to data compiled by the Harvard Injury Control Research Center, and the suicide rate with firearms has dropped by more than half.

    Or we can look north to Canada. It now requires a 28-day waiting period to buy a handgun, and it imposes a clever safeguard: gun buyers should have the support of two people vouching for them.

    For that matter, we can look for inspiration at our own history on auto safety. As with guns, some auto deaths are caused by people who break laws or behave irresponsibly. But we don’t shrug and say, “Cars don’t kill people, drunks do.”

    Instead, we have required seat belts, air bags, child seats and crash safety standards. We have introduced limited licenses for young drivers and tried to curb the use of mobile phones while driving. All this has reduced America’s traffic fatality rate per mile driven by nearly 90 percent since the 1950s.

    Some of you are alive today because of those auto safety regulations. And if we don’t treat guns in the same serious way, some of you and some of your children will die because of our failure.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/op...=tw-share&_r=0


    Meet The Press ‏@meetthepress
    RT @BetsyMTP BREAKING on #MTP: Dianne Feinstein says she will intro Assault Weapons ban on first day of the new Congress.
    Last edited by C Mart; 12-16-2012 at 10:06 AM.

  5. #185
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Staten Island
    Posts
    10,874
    Quote Originally Posted by MCBNY View Post
    I think now is a good time to rekindle the debate on guns and regulation of guns in the U.S. We are going to have strong, passionate, differing opinions so please try to keep it civil, although it probably won’t happen.

    I stand on the far end of one side in believing that guns should be banned entirely. I see no positives. They are way too easily accessible, first of all. I think everyone should be able to agree on that. Why do repeated massacres like Virginia Tech, Columbine, last night’s keep happening? Because these psychopaths can just waltz into a gun shop and buy them. The system and background checks are so loosely enforced, if they are even enforced at all. It’s an absolute joke.

    Here’s a comment I read online from someone:

    ****
    “I live in Madrid now. No handguns.

    Last week, both my iPad and my iPhone were stolen in the subway.

    In response to the loss of my property (about which I was violently angry), a friend in the States wrote, "Don't you wish you'd had had a gun so you could've shot them?", to which I replied, "As angry as I am, stuff is just stuff, and nothing is worth a human life."

    I don't think most Americans realize what it's like to live in a culture in which there is zero fear of gun violence, as opposed to one in which people are legally armed and able to act immediately on their reptilian instincts with deadly force.

    It's just crazy. Completely crazy.”
    ****

    I could not agree more with him. It’s time for America to change. I know people want to cringe with the slightest mention at becoming more like Europe, but there’s no denying they have better policies with regard to gun control. That’s my opinion at least. Actually, it’s more of a fact, because gun violence is way lower over there compared to here. Isn’t that the goal? Safer country, with less of a threat of violence? I think it’s pretty straightforward. Get rid of guns = violence goes down. PROVEN.
    Long story short., Teacher or principal maybe janitor has a 38 with a permit. Things go in a totally different direction.

  6. #186
    Quote Originally Posted by thebigragu View Post
    Long story short., Teacher or principal maybe janitor has a 38 with a permit. Things go in a totally different direction.
    Of course they do, everyone has a gun things go in a different direction - everyone has gun a lot more death. That's what happens and that's what has been proven by your rates of gun ownership and rates of death by gun in your country.

    How about noone has a gun? You want it for hunting or for sport or for your job, that's OK, but everyone else? Forget about it. That's what happens in other countries, and that's why in other first world countries these situations don't arise 3 or 4 times a year or so.

  7. #187
    Quote Originally Posted by stanner View Post
    I get the "emulating video games" argument even though I'm not sure I buy it. In this instance, however, I'm not aware of any games where the target is tiny children.

    Without any further information or evidence, I'm prepared to say that the most devastating factor in all of this is that guy was a fukcing monster.
    and all the other "monsters" that have done this the past 15 years??? Where have those "monster skills" been developed???

    The Oregon mall shooting earlier this week...The CO movie theater, VA Tech, Columbine, AZ and House of Rep Giffords, etc....
    Last edited by C Mart; 12-16-2012 at 11:02 AM.

  8. #188
    All League
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Boston area
    Posts
    4,475
    Quote Originally Posted by Soberphobia View Post
    Of course they do, everyone has a gun things go in a different direction - everyone has gun a lot more death. That's what happens and that's what has been proven by your rates of gun ownership and rates of death by gun in your country.

    How about noone has a gun? You want it for hunting or for sport or for your job, that's OK, but everyone else? Forget about it. That's what happens in other countries, and that's why in other first world countries these situations don't arise 3 or 4 times a year or so.
    That horse has been out of the barn there for 100+ years beginning with the mass production. I read that there are already 200+ million guns already out there in the US. A ban today would do zero from preventing a criminal or nutjob to obtain one on the street or through theft. In that case the cliche would ring true that "when guns are outlawed only outlaws will have guns".

    Also a gun used for sport/hunting/job is just as lethal for those intent on evil. For example I carry a Glock 40 cal for my job that holds a mag of 12+ rounds. What if I had it because of sport shooting and it was stolen by a nut? I can reload a fresh mag(s) within 3 seconds and shoot as fast as I can pull the trigger.

    I get your sentiment but it's the equivalent of shaking your fist at a cloud.

  9. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by thebigragu View Post
    Long story short., Teacher or principal maybe janitor has a 38 with a permit. Things go in a totally different direction.
    When we bring back the draft for every man and women and train everyone how to use military type of weapons, take care of them, lock them up and understand their power, I'm all for letting everyone own them. Until then I don't want a principle or teacher that learned how to use a gun on the internet defending my kids.

  10. #190
    All League
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA
    Posts
    3,662
    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    and all the other "monsters" that have done this the past 15 years??? Where have those "monster skills" been developed???

    The Oregon mall shooting earlier this week...The CO movie theater, VA Tech, Columbine, AZ and House of Rep Giffords, etc....
    Your saying video games are the common denominator? I'm saying that they're fukced in the head is the common denominator.

    I've played video games. The violent kind. I have for years and currently still train at a high level with guns (not a gun nut; purchased my first and only personal gun several months ago). I assure you video games have not helped my proficiency with weapons.

  11. #191
    Quote Originally Posted by stanner View Post
    Your saying video games are the common denominator? I'm saying that they're fukced in the head is the common denominator.

    I've played video games. The violent kind. I have for years and currently still train at a high level with guns (not a gun nut; purchased my first and only personal gun several months ago). I assure you video games have not helped my proficiency with weapons.
    +as many 1's as I could type if I types a thousand years.

    Games do not make killers. Insane people occasionally play games.

    Guns to not create killers. Insane people occasionally choose guns to kill.

    I've played games my whole life, and I've never been violent to anyone, and I don't own (nor desire) a gun.

    But then again, I'm not insane.

  12. #192
    Board Moderator
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Posts
    5,622
    Quote Originally Posted by Soberphobia View Post
    Of course they do, everyone has a gun things go in a different direction - everyone has gun a lot more death. That's what happens and that's what has been proven by your rates of gun ownership and rates of death by gun in your country.

    How about noone has a gun? You want it for hunting or for sport or for your job, that's OK, but everyone else? Forget about it. That's what happens in other countries, and that's why in other first world countries these situations don't arise 3 or 4 times a year or so.
    That's great. Meanwhile, the proliferation of guns in the black market will explode tenfold.

    As much as you would like there to be one easy answer, there isn't. There are no easy answers.

  13. #193
    Quote Originally Posted by stanner View Post
    Your saying video games are the common denominator? I'm saying that they're fukced in the head is the common denominator.

    I've played video games. The violent kind. I have for years and currently still train at a high level with guns (not a gun nut; purchased my first and only personal gun several months ago). I assure you video games have not helped my proficiency with weapons.
    People have been F'd up in the head for centuries. Not saying its the only cause but it does seem that the violence and disregard for life has increased the past 15-20 yrs. is it all video games? No. Is it all TV? No. But I don't doubt some correlation.

  14. #194
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Staten Island
    Posts
    10,874
    Quote Originally Posted by Soberphobia View Post
    Of course they do, everyone has a gun things go in a different direction - everyone has gun a lot more death. That's what happens and that's what has been proven by your rates of gun ownership and rates of death by gun in your country.

    How about noone has a gun? You want it for hunting or for sport or for your job, that's OK, but everyone else? Forget about it. That's what happens in other countries, and that's why in other first world countries these situations don't arise 3 or 4 times a year or so.
    Every free thinking rational law abiding citizen in this country should have a gun.

    Fairy tales must be nice. Nobody has a gun no one. Right after that all the crackheads will achieve total sobriety. And the drug dealers thugs gangmembers will all collectively agree to just settle they're differences over a coffee in Starbucks. As long as they Carry and they will always carry, get a gun and learn how to use it. Otherwise goodluck

  15. #195
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonhomme Richard View Post
    There are no easy answers.
    All kinds of people on Facebook are saying otherwise. Not only that but no two of their easy answers are alike!

  16. #196
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    13,143
    Quote Originally Posted by doggin94it View Post
    Spain gunman kills four in Girona province

    Spain relives notorious massacre after shotgun killer hangs himself in cell



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rampage_killers


    Just since 1990, in Europe:


    Izquierdo, Antonio, 53
    Izquierdo, Emilio, 58 Aug. 26 1990 Puerto Hurraco Spain 9
    6-12
    F Criscione, Erminio, 36 March 4 1992 Rivera, Massagno & Origlio Switzerland 6
    6
    F Milicic, Drago, 23^ Feb. 2 1992 Bijeljina & Modran Bosnia-Herzegovina 6
    0
    F Palic, Vinko, 28^° Jan. 1 1993 Zrinski Topolovac Croatia 9
    5-7
    F Mikolajczyk, Erwin, 39 March 9 1994 Euskirchen Germany 6
    8
    F E Flink, Mattias, 24^ June 11 1994 Falun Sweden 7
    1
    F Zethraeus, Tommy, 25 Dec. 4 1994 Stockholm Sweden 4
    18-20
    F Bešlić, Borislav, 41^ June 18 1994 Osijek Croatia 4
    8
    F Shayakhmetov, ---, 66° June 25 1994 Ural Mountains Russia 6
    0
    MA Morgan, David Cedric, 30 Dec. 8 1994 Birmingham U.K. 0
    15
    M
    Borel, Eric, 16° Sep. 23/24 1995 Solliès-Pont & Cuers France 15
    4-5
    FM Unknown Feb. 17 1997 Zavyalovka Ukraine 7
    ?
    M Chubarov, Yuri, 47 Sep. 20 1997 Iecava Latvia 7
    1
    F Unknown May 24 1997 Balagansk Russia 4
    6
    F Gautsch, Johann, 36 Nov. 21 1997 Mauterndorf Austria 6
    0
    F Matajić-Tunja, Antun, 51 April 14 1998 Slavonski Brod Croatia 7
    1
    F Zavistonovičius, Leonardas, 58 Feb. 15 1998 Draučiai Lithuania 8
    1
    F Peyerl, Martin, 16° Nov. 1 1999 Bad Reichenhall Germany 4
    5-7
    F Ewen, Günter Hermann, 36 May 16 1999 Dillingen
    Sierck-les-Bains Germany
    France 5
    11
    F
    Leibacher, Friedrich Heinz, 57 Sep. 27 2001 Zug Switzerland 14
    18
    F E Roux-Durrafourt, Jean-Pierre, 44 Oct. 29 2001 Tours France 4
    7
    F Durn, Richard, 33 March 27 2002 Nanterre France 8
    19
    F Shageyev, Almaz, 21^
    (Алмаз Шагеев)
    Sukhorukov, Mikhail, 20^
    (Михаил Сухоруков) Feb. 3-5 2002 Tatarstan Russia 9
    2
    F Semidovskiy, Sergey, 40^
    (Сергей Семидовский) Aug. 24 2002 Yaroslavka Russia 5
    10
    F Unknown, 32 Sep. 6 2002 Obfelden Switzerland 0
    14
    M
    Sacco, Angelo Secondo, 54 June 28 2005 Bogogno Italy 3
    9
    F P., Mike, 16 May 26 2006 Berlin Germany 0
    34
    M Radosavljevic, Nikola, 38° July 27 2007 Jabukovac Serbia 9
    2
    F Yevsyukov, Denis, 32^
    (Денис Евсюков) April 27 2009 Moscow Russia 2-6
    6-7
    F

    Bird, Derrick, 52° June 2 2010 Copeland, Cumbria U.K. 12
    11
    F Harman, Ľubomír, 48 Aug. 30 2010 Devínska Nová Ves Slovakia 7
    15
    F Radmacher, Sabine, 41° Sep. 19 2010 Lörrach Germany 3
    18
    FMA Amrani, Nordine, 33 Dec. 13 2011 Liège Belgium 6
    123
    F E van der Vlis, Tristan, 24 April 9 2011 Alphen aan den Rijn Netherlands 6
    17
    F



    The numbers after the locations are the people killed and wounded



    That's 34 spree killers in 22 years.

    In the US, there were 29 in the same time period - fewer than Europe.

    You were saying?
    I agree with your opinion but those numbers are misleading. Your “European” stats include EU + Russia that’s over 640+ million people vs. the US: 300+ million. One could argue that the US has more killing sprees per habitant…

    I don’t think stricter gun laws would have an effect on this type of tragedy. A desperate act by a deranged person cannot be predicted or canalized. In theory, stricter gun laws should have an impact on gun violence in general (ie: getting shot over a parking space). With so many guns in circulation, I don’t know what kind of impact such legislation would have.

    That being said, and having lived both in the US and Europe, I do feel safer here. FWIW, I know one person in my circle of friends/family here who owns a firearm: a hunting rifle.
    Last edited by RaoulDuke; 12-17-2012 at 03:41 AM. Reason: spelling

  17. #197
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:GFY・゚✧
    Posts
    32,426
    Quote Originally Posted by southparkcpa View Post
    Watching CNN or FOX (forget which), an Army psychiatrist, teaching at West Point stated this is just the beginning. He was steadfast and somewhat angry.

    "We are raising a generation of kids with no responsibility and allowing them to play games hours a day that glorify killing". Went on to say.."You parents who allow this need to look to yourselves, in fact, you may be the first victim"

    He sounded very reasonable and as I write this I can see his passion is lost but you get the idea.




    My kids are in their 20's and we laugh today about the fact that I would NEVER allow video games in the house.
    That's your perogative as a parent and I wish more parents would do the same. However I don't think my daughters are going to turn into monsters because I let them play Nintendogs on their 3DS.

    Most people are quick to rush to judgement about things they don't even understand.
    Ryan Lanza (obviously wrongfully accused) had a 'like' on his Facebook page for the game Mass Effect.

    This was the ensuing response, without a single one of these people even knowing what the hell the game was about. Ridiculous mob mentality at its finest





    Quote Originally Posted by stanner View Post
    I get the "emulating video games" argument even though I'm not sure I buy it. In this instance, however, I'm not aware of any games where the target is tiny children.

    Without any further information or evidence, I'm prepared to say that the most devastating factor in all of this is that guy was a fukcing monster.

    Agreed, and I would challenge anyone here to find any videogames that do, because there aren't any.


    Quote Originally Posted by C Mart View Post
    and all the other "monsters" that have done this the past 15 years??? Where have those "monster skills" been developed???

    The Oregon mall shooting earlier this week...The CO movie theater, VA Tech, Columbine, AZ and House of Rep Giffords, etc....

    What exactly, do you mean, 'skills'?
    This pisses me off. Holding a game controller is not the same thing as holding a gun. One is reality, one is not. The problem arises with the people that cannot differentiate between the two.

    And if they have problems doing that, then they will have the same issues when watching movies, reading books, or browsing the internet.

    And if people want to point the ****ing finger at videogames one more freaking time, I'm going to puke. It's an all too convenient scapegoat, and continues to be for the last 20 years.

    The people that constantly blame them are the ones that have never picked up a controller in their entire life, and usually have no clue what their talking about. Dont want your kids playing these games? Then it's your responsibility as a parent to make sure that they don't.

    Want a medium that glorifies and desensitizes kids to violence? Try television and Hollywood. It's far more accessible, and has been around a hell of a lot longer.
    Last edited by Fishooked; 12-17-2012 at 06:27 AM.

  18. #198
    It actually seems to be one of the unwritten rules in the gaming industry that you can't kill kids. If you look at any of the GTA or Saints Row games, open worlds where you can do whatever you want, the only "people" that populate the world are adults.

    The airport massacre in MW2? No kids in a jam packed airport. Not a coincidence.

    Correlation isn't causation. Violent people are drawn to violent activities. There is no evidence to support the idea that playing violent video games or watching violent movies increases violent behavior.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    The 2nd Amendment was written 220-something years ago. The right to bear arms meant the right to own a musket that you could shoot once every minute or so and pistol that also took forever to reload. I don't know why it's so hard to understand that we're living in a different world.



    That said, we have the same problem with guns that we have with illegal immigrants. It's too late to implement the ideal solution. There are too many illegals to throw them all out (which I'd love to be able to do), and there are too many guns to take most of them away.

    I think we have to adopt some kind of class system, like they have in some other countries. If you don't have professional training, then you don't have access to anything above the lower classes (hunting weapons). Assault weapons would have to be kept on site at a range.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Lastly, I don't get the gun thing. Why are there so many guns in this country? People say it's for protection, but that's BS. If you don't feel safe in (98%) of this country, then you'll never feel safe anywhere, even with your guns. No, I think it's a lot of people that like to believe they're some kind of action hero. (These are the people who say they need their guns so that they can overthrow the government if it goes too far, or defend the country if we're ever invaded. Good luck with either one of those )

    An object whose primary function is to kill people is not something that there should be 200,000,000 of in this country.

    An object whose primary function is to kill people should have the very strictest regulations that we can imagine.

  19. #199
    Anyone still doubting some action needs to be taken? Folks should not be allowed to build arsenals.

    CEDAR LAKE, Ind. (AP) — A northern Indiana man who allegedly threatened to "kill as many people as he could" at an elementary school near his home was arrested by officers who later found 47 guns and ammunition hidden throughout his home.

    Von. I. Meyer, 60, of Cedar Lake, was arrested Saturday after prosecutors filed formal charges of felony intimidation, domestic battery and resisting law enforcement against him. He was being held Sunday without bond at the Lake County Jail, pending an initial hearing on the charges, police said in a statement.
    Cedar Lake Police officers were called to Meyer's home early Friday after he allegedly threatened to set his wife on fire once she fell asleep, the statement said.

    Meyer also threatened to enter nearby Jane Ball Elementary School "and kill as many people as he could before police could stop him," the statement said. Meyer's home is less than 1,000 feet from the school and linked to it by trails and paths through a wooded area, police said.

    Police said in the statement that they notified school officials and boosted security at all area schools Friday — the same day 26 people, including 20 students, were shot and killed at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

    On Saturday, officers served warrants at Meyer's home and arrested him. The statement said police had learned that Meyer kept many weapons in his older, two-story home and "is a known member of the Invaders Motorcycle Gang."

    Officers searched the home, finding 47 guns and ammunition worth more than $100,000 hidden throughout the home. Many of the weapons were collector's guns.
    Cedar Lake is about 45 miles southeast of Chicago.

    A dispatcher with Cedar Lake Police said that the police chief was not available for interviews until Monday.
    Lake County police spokeswoman Patti Van Til said Sunday that a SWAT team from the department assisted in serving Saturday's warrants.

    http://news.yahoo.com/ind-man-47-gun...164928349.html

  20. #200
    Hall Of Fame
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    20,780
    My biggest fear is that this national conversation will take the path of least resistance and that is video games and violence on TV. IMO those should be on the bottom of the list.

    First and foremost we need to change the way we view and treat mental illness. The majority of these mass murderers are mentally ill. Then we need to have stricter gun regulations. I have been thinking a lot about this the past few days and I agree with what the President said last night. If we can save just one victim or prevent one of these tragedies then it would be worth it. I understand that there are hundreds of millions of gun in circulation and there will never be a way to completely control them. But we have to try. We also need a better database of gun owners and people who are excluded from the right to own a gun.

    I am not a religious person but I think there may be a correlation between the decline of faith and the overall decline of society. Gov't spends a lot of time separating itself from faith. I was surprised to see how much Obama was referencing faith and religion when trying to console the nation. Like I said, I am not a religious person but I do think religion or faith of any kind does have a positive impact on society.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us