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Thread: The Media is too Rough on Sanchez

  1. #21
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    The media was just as tough on Eli (maybe a little less, but same sh*t, seriously). The difference between Eli and Sanchez is that Eli is way mentally tougher. The NY media ain't changing. Sanchez is going to have to adapt and toughen up. If he can't, he can have fun competing for a job in Kansas City or Jacksonville.
    Last edited by MCBNY; 07-30-2012 at 01:10 PM.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    Oh My God. He's a professional athlete.
    Pretty sure he means in comparison to other professional athletes...


    And I couldn't possibly disagree more with the idea that the media was just as tough on Eli. He was unbelievably and laughably bad during his first season yet avoided any significant criticism. He couldn't have had a better run game too. The guy was just complete **** as a QB but it went relatively unnoticed for whatever reason.

    If Sanchez had that type of start to his career, he wouldn't be here right now.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsfan1983 View Post
    Pretty sure he means in comparison to other professional athletes...


    And I couldn't possibly disagree more with the idea that the media was just as tough on Eli. He was unbelievably and laughably bad during his first season yet avoided any significant criticism. He couldn't have had a better run game too. The guy was just complete **** as a QB but it went relatively unnoticed for whatever reason.

    If Sanchez had that type of start to his career, he wouldn't be here right now.
    No, I disagree. Eli got ripped pretty hard. Especially in the public, by his own fans...who are much more prone to short-term mania than the eternally hopeful Jet fan....I think Sanchez has it easier, at least in public opinion..

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    No, I disagree. Eli got ripped pretty hard. Especially in the public, by his own fans...who are much more prone to short-term mania than the eternally hopeful Jet fan....I think Sanchez has it easier, at least in public opinion..
    I agree. This photo/meme was actually a thing in a LOL Eli sense. It came from some commercial that was running at the time (Citizen?). He was pretty regularly killed for constantly throwing INTs.


  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozu View Post
    I agree. This photo/meme was actually a thing in a LOL Eli sense. It came from some commercial that was running at the time (Citizen?). He was pretty regularly killed for constantly throwing INTs.

    Nice find.....now he's at the level where 99% of the talking heads on TV only wish they could've been....

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by RIJetFan View Post
    He's got much to prove, don't get me wrong. But I was just looking at Eli's stats for his first three or four years in the league and they weren't all that different from Sanchez. In fact, Eli didn't break a 60% completion rate or an 80 passer rating until his fifth year in the league. Despite the national press's tendency to kill anything Jets, our guy still has a chance to turn into something.
    Its a good thing I think, prove them wrong, shut them up

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by patman View Post
    Why would a newspaper devote 50% of its type to non-local teams?
    Wasn't looking for a national perspective. Just looking for more balanced coverage, and less homerism. To waste column-inches of a major daily on high school sports, while major events of out-of-town teams are ignored, is mind-boggling.

    Guess my expectations for a quality sports section are based on the kind of coverage I saw in the Orlando Sentenal. A very good sports section there, or at least it was until I left town 16 years ago. In any event, the sports section of that paper has the Projo beat, by quite a large margin.

  8. #28
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    Mark Sanchez studied trajectory of Eli Manning's career
    Published: Monday, July 30, 2012, 1:27 PM Updated: Monday, July 30, 2012, 1:28 PM
    By Jenny Vrentas/The Star-Ledger

    William Perlman/The Star-Ledger

    Mark Sanchez took note of the way the Giants' Eli Manning "weathered the storm."
    CORTLAND, N.Y -- As Mark Sanchez enters his fourth year, one surrounded by scrutiny and pressure, the Jets quarterback found some perspective in the career of another New York quarterback.
    Sanchez has looked at and learned from the career arc of the Giants' Eli Manning, who won his first Super Bowl in his fourth season and his second in his eighth season. Sanchez noted the way Manning really took off during the playoffs of the 2007 season, and said it served as a reminder to be patient.
    "This whole thing is a learning process, and itís really a marathon and not a sprint," Sanchez said. "So just keep your head down, keep working, smile, and have a good time with it."
    Sanchez even rattled off Manning's statistics from that 2007 Super Bowl season, unprompted.
    "That fourth year, I think he threw one pick in the playoffs when they won that Super Bowl -- one. And I think he might have thrown 20 in the regular season. I've been there, plenty of quarterbacks have been there, so you see the margin for error in this league is so small. And once the quarterback, the offense and the coordinator really realize that, and take advantage of that and show that on the field, you can win a lot of games and be very successful."
    Sanchez says it's natural to study the trajectory of other quarterbacks in similar situations, and Manning is a natural parallel. The two quarterbacks actually had very similar statistics in their third professional seasons. Manning completed 57.7 percent of his passes for 3,244 yards, with 24 touchdowns and 18 interceptions. Sanchez completed 56.7 percent of his passes for 3,474 yards, with 26 touchdowns and 18 interceptions.
    "You see guys elevate their game in the playoffs, you look at other careers -- that kind of stuff gets brought to your attention," Sanchez said. "And especially (if) you have similar career tracks as somebody else in the league or a similar upbringing. Just like (Andrew) Luck and (Peyton) Manning. They are both first-round picks; they both stayed for their senior year. You just pick up on similarities like that. So yeah, I looked into it, and have seen how successful he's been and seen how he has really weathered the storm and played really well. His game is unbelievable. He's doing a great job."
    Sanchez realizes that for quarterbacks, sometimes it takes until they are veterans in their fourth, fifth or even sixth years to really blossom.
    "It takes time, it takes a confidence level and that only happens through getting more and more reps," Sanchez said. "And as guys mature and get a little older and more familiar with the defenses they see, get more familiar with their surroundings, what a pre-game routine is like, they really nail down their own routine and kind of find themselves.
    "They just start playing better, they feel more comfortable, they suddenly become more accurate and people take notice of it in their fourth, fifth, sixth year. But itís a process and a lot of them who had early success might have sat for a couple years and watched somebody do it for two, three years and then came in and really took the league by storm."

    http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/201...trajector.html

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by RIJetFan View Post
    He's got much to prove, don't get me wrong. But I was just looking at Eli's stats for his first three or four years in the league and they weren't all that different from Sanchez. In fact, Eli didn't break a 60% completion rate or an 80 passer rating until his fifth year in the league. Despite the national press's tendency to kill anything Jets, our guy still has a chance to turn into something.
    Let me preface my comments with the following.

    I still think Sanchez can be a very good QB. I think the idea that he's in a QB competition is a media created piece that has no basis in reality. He has won in the playoffs, and he has played well in the playoffs, and I believe that is worth something.

    However,

    1. Sanchez has not been good enough. He has to improve, there have been plenty of young QBs that have been better than him over their first 3 years. (Ryan, Freeman, Stafford, Flacco, etc)

    2. Eli Manning was abused in the media in his first 3 seasons as well. That's the deal if you are a young QB in NY and struggling. This cannot be stated enough. The media will kill any QB who doesn't succeed in NY

    3. QBs that start out like Manning and Sanchez over the past 15 years are normally not QBs that become great later in their career. That doesn't mean it's written in stone, but Manning is the exception, not the rule.

    4. Manning won a Super Bowl in his 4th season, he was pretty terrible through out much of that season, in fact, he only avoided be benched because there was absolute garbage behind him (Jared Lorenzen and Anthony Wright). Before his final regular season game against the Patriots, he had 19 TDs, 19 Ints, 7 fumbles lost and 55% completion.

    Manning found himself against the Pats and has played well pretty much ever since. Sanchez, I feel, will not get the opportunity to be that poor in his 4th season (in fact, since his rookie year, he has not had a regular season as poor as Manning's 4th season).


    Someone wanted proof of QBs who start like Manning not being successful. This link is a list of any QBs who started more than 40 games before the age of 28 in only their first 4 seasons. I'm only looking at QBs drafted in the first 2 rounds


    There are only 21 QBs on the list. Sanchez is currently 17th in passer rating

    13 - Chad Henne
    14 - Tim Couch
    15 - David Carr
    16 - Eli Manning
    17 - Mark Sanchez
    18 - Vince Young
    19 - Kyle Boller
    20 - Alex Smith
    21 - Joey Harrington

    http://pfref.com/tiny/gzrxJ

    Again, these are just numbers, but the fact that Sanchez's numbers are similar to Eli's is not a good thing, even if Manning turned it around.
    Last edited by Batmans A Scientist; 07-30-2012 at 02:26 PM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beerfish View Post
    Sanchez, Eli comparisons are meaningless. You can choose just as many guys that have similar or worse stats than Sanchez who have failed in their careers as using ones like Eli how have succeeded.
    The interesting question is, why in the hell did Eli struggle so much early in his career?

    Look at his collegiate experience, pedigree, skillset, etc. he sould've been one of those "out of the gate" QBs, but wasn't. He also had good receiving talent on the Giants when he came in. Maybe it was because Tiki and Shockey were aholes, but who knows?

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yankeejet22 View Post
    Mark Sanchez studied trajectory of Eli Manning's career
    Published: Monday, July 30, 2012, 1:27 PM Updated: Monday, July 30, 2012, 1:28 PM
    By Jenny Vrentas/The Star-Ledger

    William Perlman/The Star-Ledger

    Mark Sanchez took note of the way the Giants' Eli Manning "weathered the storm."
    CORTLAND, N.Y -- As Mark Sanchez enters his fourth year, one surrounded by scrutiny and pressure, the Jets quarterback found some perspective in the career of another New York quarterback.
    Sanchez has looked at and learned from the career arc of the Giants' Eli Manning, who won his first Super Bowl in his fourth season and his second in his eighth season. Sanchez noted the way Manning really took off during the playoffs of the 2007 season, and said it served as a reminder to be patient.
    "This whole thing is a learning process, and itís really a marathon and not a sprint," Sanchez said. "So just keep your head down, keep working, smile, and have a good time with it."
    Sanchez even rattled off Manning's statistics from that 2007 Super Bowl season, unprompted.
    "That fourth year, I think he threw one pick in the playoffs when they won that Super Bowl -- one. And I think he might have thrown 20 in the regular season. I've been there, plenty of quarterbacks have been there, so you see the margin for error in this league is so small. And once the quarterback, the offense and the coordinator really realize that, and take advantage of that and show that on the field, you can win a lot of games and be very successful."
    Sanchez says it's natural to study the trajectory of other quarterbacks in similar situations, and Manning is a natural parallel. The two quarterbacks actually had very similar statistics in their third professional seasons. Manning completed 57.7 percent of his passes for 3,244 yards, with 24 touchdowns and 18 interceptions. Sanchez completed 56.7 percent of his passes for 3,474 yards, with 26 touchdowns and 18 interceptions.
    "You see guys elevate their game in the playoffs, you look at other careers -- that kind of stuff gets brought to your attention," Sanchez said. "And especially (if) you have similar career tracks as somebody else in the league or a similar upbringing. Just like (Andrew) Luck and (Peyton) Manning. They are both first-round picks; they both stayed for their senior year. You just pick up on similarities like that. So yeah, I looked into it, and have seen how successful he's been and seen how he has really weathered the storm and played really well. His game is unbelievable. He's doing a great job."
    Sanchez realizes that for quarterbacks, sometimes it takes until they are veterans in their fourth, fifth or even sixth years to really blossom.
    "It takes time, it takes a confidence level and that only happens through getting more and more reps," Sanchez said. "And as guys mature and get a little older and more familiar with the defenses they see, get more familiar with their surroundings, what a pre-game routine is like, they really nail down their own routine and kind of find themselves.
    "They just start playing better, they feel more comfortable, they suddenly become more accurate and people take notice of it in their fourth, fifth, sixth year. But itís a process and a lot of them who had early success might have sat for a couple years and watched somebody do it for two, three years and then came in and really took the league by storm."

    http://www.nj.com/jets/index.ssf/201...trajector.html
    Jenny must read JI.

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by SMC View Post
    The interesting question is, why in the hell did Eli struggle so much early in his career?

    Look at his collegiate experience, pedigree, skillset, etc. he sould've been one of those "out of the gate" QBs, but wasn't. He also had good receiving talent on the Giants when he came in. Maybe it was because Tiki and Shockey were aholes, but who knows?
    Eli came into the league in 2004, prior to the NFL passing explosion. It's debatable whether Eli's stats in his first 3 seasons would have been much better had they been from 2009-2011, assuming the same supporting cast.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    Can you prove this statement? Or are you just guessing?
    From the standpoint that there are a lot more mediocre QBs out there than there are elite ones.

    If you're looking at it from the perspective of taking the elite QB and seeing where (and how) they started, that's one thing. But, they're special in that they actually got to the pinnacle of their profession. There are a ton more QBs who started out unspectacularly and remained there for the simple reason that its a lot easier to be an unspectacular QB.

    The fact that Eli started off the way he did and then progressed to where he is now shows that it can be done - not that its the preferred path towards eliteness.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIJetFan View Post
    He's got much to prove, don't get me wrong. But I was just looking at Eli's stats for his first three or four years in the league and they weren't all that different from Sanchez. In fact, Eli didn't break a 60% completion rate or an 80 passer rating until his fifth year in the league. Despite the national press's tendency to kill anything Jets, our guy still has a chance to turn into something.
    Sanchez's stats are also very similar to Joey Harrington's first three years in the league, and Harrington didn't have a quarter of the talent around him that Sanchez has had.

    I'm hoping that the kid plays well this year and solidifies himself as this teams longterm solution at QB. But please, for the love of God, can we stop with the Eli comparsions?

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by BleedGreen314 View Post
    Jenny must read JI.
    Isn't the market still open? Get back to work.

  16. #36
    Eli has a much better arm than Sanchez. While you can develop your game as far as reads, your arm after 3 years is your arm.

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by patman View Post
    Eli has a much better arm than Sanchez. While you can develop your game as far as reads, your arm after 3 years is your arm.
    Eli also has a better arm than Brady does. Sanchez has enough arm to make all the throws. Thats all that matters.

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by patman View Post
    Eli has a much better arm than Sanchez. While you can develop your game as far as reads, your arm after 3 years is your arm.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gibby View Post
    Eli also has a better arm than Brady does. Sanchez has enough arm to make all the throws. Thats all that matters.

    I'm not sure how exactly scientific these types of claims are.

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Beerfish View Post
    Sanchez, Eli comparisons are meaningless. You can choose just as many guys that have similar or worse stats than Sanchez who have failed in their careers as using ones like Eli how have succeeded.
    You are correct in that comparing the two is meaningless, but even more so is dismissing the QB completely because he didn't play like an All-Pro QB right out of the gate. Sanchez had a different set of WRs every year he was here. By most of JI's admission, he had a bad set of coaches, difficulty in the O-Line last year, and played well in the playoffs.

    There are excuses for everything. He's not a franchise QB (maybe 5 are this year), but people on here demand 40 TDs/5000 yards. And anything short of that, he's a bust. The days of 5INTs are over. The guy was running for his life last year, and yes, had bad games, but you realize Brady/Rodgers/Stafford/etc all have bad games as well.

    Sanchez will succeed in this league. Whether it's on the NY Jets, is another story.

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Untouchable View Post
    Sanchez's stats are also very similar to Joey Harrington's first three years in the league, and Harrington didn't have a quarter of the talent around him that Sanchez has had.

    I'm hoping that the kid plays well this year and solidifies himself as this teams longterm solution at QB. But please, for the love of God, can we stop with the Eli comparsions?
    +10000000

    I hate the Sanchez/Eli comparisons for this exact reason. If Sanchez wants to go out and win a SB this year with a miraculous 4th quarter drive, then we can and will gladly compare him to Eli. Until then, there are far more QBs who started off like Sanchez and fizzled, than those who went on to win multiple Super Bowls.

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