Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 70 of 70

Thread: Cimini: The re-making of Mark Sanchez: QB concentrated on footwork in offseason

  1. #61
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Vinegar Hill, Brooklyn ...
    Posts
    2,228
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Blast View Post
    Sanchez was running for his life last year. He needed Callahan's help more than Cavanaugh's. The trouble was that Callahan couldn't make champagne out of beer. That said, Sanchez needs to pay more attention to his footwork when under pressure.

    Good point, if there is no pocket to begin with it is likely easy to fall into bad habits. That said, the line is healthier this year but the weakspots are still there; no upgrades to give him extra time in the pocket. Sanchez is capable of good QB play behind a very good o line; anything less than stellar oline play, I fear he turns into an interception machine.

  2. #62
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    light-years ahead
    Posts
    2,426
    Post Thanks / Like
    Then Brick took a sheet of notebook paper and divided it into three columns:

    Snap. Snooze. Save.

    With a cup of Gatorade he graded and grilled himself.

    Am I waiting for the snap and not false starting?
    Am I snoozing hard enough without getting busted or flagged?
    Am I playing soft and saving myself for Hawaii/Pro Bowl?


    Ferguson passed the test easily, earning unsolicited giggles from his wife.

  3. #63
    All League
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    3,924
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    getting back to basics is exactly what Sanchez needs. Schottenheimer was a coach who routinely overthought every single thing that he did and giving him and Rex a rookie QB to Over Micro manage was a perfect storm if inefficiency. Working on basic footwork, simplifying protections, and p Looking at Sanchez career here I think the over-coaching has really had a negative affect on him and its something that we can easily undo.

    Looking back on the last 3 years, it is clear that sanchez was never allowed to play any instinctual football at all, unless its the 2 minute drill, which is consequently when he plays his best. Not only did this affect his on the field performance, but Im sure it affected his attitude as he is unable to simply play the game the way he has his whole life. I can't imagine he enjoyed playing in the offense we have given him the past 3 years.

    Starting with his injury on the scramble and head first dive in his first year, Rex basically forbid him from running. Mark was not drafted to be a pocket passer and his athleticism was a big part of what made him successful. He is absolutely quick enough to run 2-3 times a game when the situation presents itself and we need to allow him to do that again...

    After the disaster of a buffalo game his rookie year, which IMO is completely schottys fault as he continued to call pass plays and mark had to run them, they used the color coded scheme. I get that it helped a rookie at the time, but it was still being used last year and it is a welcome site to now see it thrown in the garbage. Mark will be in his 4th year of starting including playing in and winning BIG playoff games. He needs to start trusting his ability and not constantly "thinking".

    Schottys constant personnel changes and motion also put way too much thinking into marks head pre-snap. He needs to be able to get to the line, concentrate on looking at the defense and then playing. Worrying about multiple people on offense moving pre-snap is not what a QB should be focused on, especially when the OC routinely gets the plays in late.

    I think this past year will also really sanchez develop as a person and player. Before coming to the Jets Sanchez lost 2 games as a starting QB in his career (he lost a 3rd at USC coming in when john booty got hurt). Although he struggled a bit, he made the Final Four in both of his first years in the NFL. Add to that fact, that I can't imagine he had to deal with much criticism/negativity in his life prior to this year, growing up as the top HS player and leading hometown USC to a Rose Bowl win. Plus at 25 years old, he is extremely young for the amount he has already played and most likely is still developing the maturity to lead and play the position as its needed. I think dealing with this adversity for the first time in his life will either make or break him, and I believe it will make him. The cali demeanor has to fade and its time for him to develop the attitude and accountability to take his play to the next level.

    I sincerely hope that Sparano takes the reins off him and simply tells him to start just playing football. Let Mark know that the line will be in a position to protect him (ie help from the TE) and that we will give him opportunities down the field. We will play to his strengths, allowing him to roll out more, run designed waggles, take shots down the field, and scramble if the opportunity presents itself. Its on him to get his mind away from being skittish in the pocket, and start making the plays.

    This is a guy who managed to step up for us in multiple playoff games....and is someone that has made enough big throws that we know the talent is in there somewhere. I honestly hope we take the reins off him and finally see what we have at this point in his career. Playing to Sanchezí strengths is exactly what the team needs to be doing.
    Nice job.

  4. #64
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,013
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by jetswin View Post
    I disagree here, fundamentals are key to every sport at every level for success.
    Quote Originally Posted by SINYJets View Post
    It's difficult to maintain proper footwork when your getting hit halfway into your drop. His pocket presence was wrecked last year by our o-line.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gangrene View Post
    You're right, of course, but you know well that everybody strays from fundamentals, even the great ones ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Funaz View Post
    Especially since Brady's mechanics go to crap when he faces consistent Pressure up the middle. You would think a 3x SB winning alltime great would still have the focus to maintain good mechanics while constantly getting pressured.
    Quote Originally Posted by sec.101row23 View Post
    Wait, they just showed Peyton Manning on NFL Network warming up in Denver and they said "here is Peyton Manning working on his mechanics before practice starts". I thought that was only for players who have not developed their fundamentals and are not progressing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Brown View Post
    Are you serious with this comment?

    Tom Brady is still and constantly working on the fundamentals. That is how you get better.

    Come on Now!!!!!!
    Repetitions...repetitions...repetitions...that is a neverending component of attaining greatness, and maintaining greatness in a sport.

    This is especially true in what is probably the most complicated and important positions in professional team sports...the QB position in football, or a pitcher in MLB.

    That's why you see a pitching guru like Tom House, being sought after by future HOF QBs like Brees and Brady, on their throwing mechanics. They are positions very similar to each other in many ways. And over many decades...both positions have been raised to the level of an art form. These players are always in need of a mentor, or some kind of guru, to help them perfect or maintain their performance.

    An apprenticeship that never ends...and begins in the minors.

    You need a significant amount of time in the minor leagues, to develop the necessary skills to compete successfully at the pro level. When you don't get that...no matter how talented the player...he will struggle to overcome that lack of preparation.

    With QBs and pitchers...so much of their success depends on footwork and all aspects of the mechanics of throwing. So its important to establish a solid foundation in the minors first, before entering the NFL or MLB.

    I pointed out in a thread I started last October, that 16 starts in either sport is not enough minor league seasoning, to cement the good mechanics and release of the ball, that the player is showing at that point in his development, and then transfer it to the pro level. It is very rare for player to be ready to successfully compete against NFL defenses, or MLB hitters, with just 16 starts worth of repetitions and experience. Its not enough for the mechanics to become part of his unconscious background. And that's where it needs to be. Because the QB/pitcher needs to be focusing all his attention on what the defenses are doing...or the hitter with men on base situations...etc. If he's half thinking about his footwork and throwing mechanics...he'll have the rug pulled out right from under him.

    And that's what happened to Sanchez. A big part of why he's struggling, is that he needed more reps in the college minors. Unfortunately...he's now getting those reps he needed the hard way...against NFL defenses. And if Schotty's offense was a part of problem...that only made things worse.

    I think the Jets brain trust understand this. So I'm glad Sanchez has a guaranteed contract through next year. Cause...IMO...he's got the talent and toughness to succeed. I'm just not sure Jets fans have the patience to let him continue developing forward, to that next plateau, where he can take all he's learned, and make more a positive difference in the outcome in games. A difference that goes beyond getting to another AFCCG...but ends in a Lombardi Trophy.
    Last edited by GreenReaper; 08-07-2012 at 07:17 PM.

  5. #65
    Jets Insider VIP
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Staten Island
    Posts
    8,695
    Post Thanks / Like
    Great reading that the coaching staff is working to fix what should have been so difficult to break; Sanchez' mechanics. Coming into the NFL, the one thing Sanchez could hang his hat on was that he was regarded as having above average fundamentals, particularly outstanding footwork. It's understandable that it disappeared last year given the protection issues that cropped up, so hopefully he will rebound nicely in that area.

    The one concern I've taken away from this article is the protection schemes. By most accounts Sanchez had the Callahan schemes pretty down pat, but his choice of passing lanes seemed to fly in the face of that. Perhaps it was more a result of the protection itself not being adequate in providing them, who knows. But learning the new schemes and finding the lanes will take a bit of time. It's amazing how so crucial a thing is overlooked in favor of a QB being on the same page as his receivers. They need to be just as in sync with their OL's blocking tendencies. Here's hopin'....

    And TX, you're a far better poster than what you are displaying in this thread. Up your game, viejo.

  6. #66
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hawthorne NJ
    Posts
    7,396
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    getting back to basics is exactly what Sanchez needs. Schottenheimer was a coach who routinely overthought every single thing that he did and giving him and Rex a rookie QB to Over Micro manage was a perfect storm if inefficiency. Working on basic footwork, simplifying protections, and p Looking at Sanchez career here I think the over-coaching has really had a negative affect on him and its something that we can easily undo.

    Looking back on the last 3 years, it is clear that sanchez was never allowed to play any instinctual football at all, unless its the 2 minute drill, which is consequently when he plays his best. Not only did this affect his on the field performance, but Im sure it affected his attitude as he is unable to simply play the game the way he has his whole life. I can't imagine he enjoyed playing in the offense we have given him the past 3 years.

    Starting with his injury on the scramble and head first dive in his first year, Rex basically forbid him from running. Mark was not drafted to be a pocket passer and his athleticism was a big part of what made him successful. He is absolutely quick enough to run 2-3 times a game when the situation presents itself and we need to allow him to do that again...

    After the disaster of a buffalo game his rookie year, which IMO is completely schottys fault as he continued to call pass plays and mark had to run them, they used the color coded scheme. I get that it helped a rookie at the time, but it was still being used last year and it is a welcome site to now see it thrown in the garbage. Mark will be in his 4th year of starting including playing in and winning BIG playoff games. He needs to start trusting his ability and not constantly "thinking".

    Schottys constant personnel changes and motion also put way too much thinking into marks head pre-snap. He needs to be able to get to the line, concentrate on looking at the defense and then playing. Worrying about multiple people on offense moving pre-snap is not what a QB should be focused on, especially when the OC routinely gets the plays in late.

    I think this past year will also really sanchez develop as a person and player. Before coming to the Jets Sanchez lost 2 games as a starting QB in his career (he lost a 3rd at USC coming in when john booty got hurt). Although he struggled a bit, he made the Final Four in both of his first years in the NFL. Add to that fact, that I can't imagine he had to deal with much criticism/negativity in his life prior to this year, growing up as the top HS player and leading hometown USC to a Rose Bowl win. Plus at 25 years old, he is extremely young for the amount he has already played and most likely is still developing the maturity to lead and play the position as its needed. I think dealing with this adversity for the first time in his life will either make or break him, and I believe it will make him. The cali demeanor has to fade and its time for him to develop the attitude and accountability to take his play to the next level.

    I sincerely hope that Sparano takes the reins off him and simply tells him to start just playing football. Let Mark know that the line will be in a position to protect him (ie help from the TE) and that we will give him opportunities down the field. We will play to his strengths, allowing him to roll out more, run designed waggles, take shots down the field, and scramble if the opportunity presents itself. Its on him to get his mind away from being skittish in the pocket, and start making the plays.

    This is a guy who managed to step up for us in multiple playoff games....and is someone that has made enough big throws that we know the talent is in there somewhere. I honestly hope we take the reins off him and finally see what we have at this point in his career. Playing to Sanchezí strengths is exactly what the team needs to be doing.
    Don't forget that the receivers had no liberty either. They need to be trusted to read the defense, and get open. They were restrained, and over coached as well. What took so long in the huddle was each receiver getting his own route call, instead of a well designed complimentary play. This way Sanchez can learn where all his receivers will be without having to think about where the other receiver will be in relation. He had a lot of ints that were picked by other guys jumping off their man. That also makes him more timid, and stare down a receiver when his first read is covered.

  7. #67
    All Pro
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,197
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PatsFanTX View Post
    Proper footwork and and the ability to move around the pocket are taught in high school.

    A 4th year starting QB in the NFL should not have these issues.
    Wrong, troll

  8. #68
    All League
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,042
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Blast View Post
    A rare nice read from this writer! Credit where credit is due.
    Agreed. Thanks $hit-meni you bastid. Finally a good article from you for a change, now time for the 99 $hitty ones from you

  9. #69
    Jets Insider VIP
    Charter JI Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Naples FL
    Posts
    42,984
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by freestater View Post
    I'm surprised the headline wasn't, "Sanchez compares himself to Joe Montana"
    Many fans here will see it that way..

  10. #70
    All Pro
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    5,210
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by NY's stepchild View Post
    Don't forget that the receivers had no liberty either. They need to be trusted to read the defense, and get open. They were restrained, and over coached as well. What took so long in the huddle was each receiver getting his own route call, instead of a well designed complimentary play. This way Sanchez can learn where all his receivers will be without having to think about where the other receiver will be in relation. He had a lot of ints that were picked by other guys jumping off their man. That also makes him more timid, and stare down a receiver when his first read is covered.
    Couldnt agree more. Not only what you said above, but schotty routinely had 2 WRs within 5 yards of each other, which means 2 defenders will also be there.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Follow Us