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Thread: Man who volunteered for Auschwitz among war heroes Poland searching for in mass grave

  1. #1

    Man who volunteered for Auschwitz among war heroes Poland searching for in mass grave

    Wow, what an incredible story about an incredible human being:

    Man who volunteered for Auschwitz among war heroes Poland searching for in mass grave


    WARSAW, Poland - It could hardly have been a riskier mission: infiltrate Auschwitz to chronicle Nazi atrocities. Witold Pilecki survived nearly three years as an inmate in the death camp, managing to smuggle out word of executions before making a daring escape. But the Polish resistance hero was crushed by the post-war communist regime tried on trumped-up charges and executed.

    Six decades on, Poland hopes Pilecki's remains will be identified among the entangled skeletons and shattered skulls of resistance fighters being excavated from a mass grave on the edge of Warsaw's Powazki Military Cemetery. The exhumations are part of a movement in the resurgent, democratic nation to officially recognize its war-time heroes and 20th century tragedies.

    "He was unique in the world," said Zofia Pilecka-Optulowicz, paying tribute to her father's 1940 decision to walk straight into a Nazi street roundup with the aim of getting inside the extermination camp. "I would like to have a place where I can light a candle for him."

    More than 100 skeletons, mostly of men, have been dug up this summer. On one recent day, forensic workers and archaeologists wearing blue plastic gloves and masks were carefully scraping away at the soil and piecing together bones as if working on a jigsaw puzzle. The front of one skull had been blown away by bullets; another had apparently been bludgeoned; a skeleton showed evidence of multiple gunshot wounds.

    Near the pit where the bodies were dumped under cover of night stand the well-tended tombstones of the very judges and prosecutors who sent these World War II heroes to their deaths under orders from Moscow, which was fearful that the Polish patriots might use their seasoned underground skills to turn the nation against its new pro-Soviet rulers.

    "The perpetrators have not been punished and the bodies of the victims have not been found," said Krzysztof Szwagrzyk, a historian in charge of the dig. "Those times will be coming back to us until we find the bodies and bury them with due honours.

    "We are doing them justice."

    Pilecki's son Andrzej and dozens of other relatives of victims have been swabbed in the hope their DNA will be a match for the skeletons. Initial work is being carried out to determine age, sex, height and injuries of the victims. It will take several months to determine if Pilecki, who was killed by a bullet to the back of his head, is among them. Thousands of resistance fighters were killed across Poland; the remains of up to 400 are believed to have been dumped in the Powazki mass grave.

    Pilecki was 38 when Germany invaded Poland on Sept. 1, 1939, triggering the start of World War II. He helped organize a resistance campaign during which many fellow fighters were caught and sent to Auschwitz, which in the early war years served more as a camp for Polish resistance fighters than Jews. That inspired him to hatch an audacious plan: He told other resistance commanders that he wanted to become an Auschwitz inmate to check on rumours of atrocities.

    Carrying documents bearing the alias Tomasz Serafinski, the Catholic cavalry officer walked into the German SS street roundup in Warsaw in September 1940, and was put on a train transport to Auschwitz, where he was given prisoner number 4859.

    He was "exceptionally courageous," said Jacek Pawlowicz, a historian with Warsaw's Institute of National Remembrance.

    Pilecki is the only person known to have volunteered for Auschwitz. His terse dispatches to the outside world were slips of thin paper stitched inside clothes of inmates leaving the camp or left in nearby fields for others to collect. They included only code names for inmates who were beaten to death, executed by gunfire or gassed. As sketchy as they were, they were the first eyewitness account of the Nazi death machine at Auschwitz.

    Pilecki survived hard labour, beatings, cold and typhoid fever thanks to support from a clandestine resistance network that he managed to organize inside the camp. Some of its members had access to food, others to clothes or medicines.

    He plotted a revolt that was to release inmates with the help of an outside attack by resistance fighters; it was never attempted because considered too risky, Pawlowicz said.

    Pilecki escaped in April 1943 when he realized that the SS might uncover his work. With two other men he ran from a night shift at a bakery that was outside the death camp's barbed wire fence.

    After his escape, Pilecki wrote three detailed reports on the extermination camp.

    One describes how his transport was met by yelling SS men and attacking dogs: "They told one of us to run to a post away from the road, and immediately sent a machine-gun round after him. Killed him. Ten random colleagues were taken out of the group and shot, as they were walking, as 'collective responsibility' for the 'escape' that the SS-men arranged themselves."

    Pilecki's heroics were for the most part in vain. Even though his accounts of gas chambers made it all the way to Poland's government-in-exile in London and to other Western capitals, few believed what they were reading.

    After escaping, Pilecki rejoined Poland's Home Army resistance force and fought in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, the city's ill-fated revolt against the Nazis. In 1947, he was arrested by the secret security of the communist regime, imposed on Poland after the war, and falsely accused of planning to assassinate dignitaries.

    The Soviet plan after World War II was to subdue the Poles by crushing resistance and erasing any sense of Polish identity or history. Today, more than two decades into Poland's democracy, however, enough documentation and funds have been gathered to restore the banned past and try to find and identify the heroes' bodies.

    In addition to Pilecki, the search is on for the remains of other wartime resistance heroes, including Brig. Gen. August Emil Fieldorf, a top clandestine Home Army commander who once served as emissary to Poland of the country's government-in-exile. He was accused of ordering killings of Soviet soldiers charges that Poland's communist authorities later admitted were fabricated and hanged in 1953.

    Szwagrzyk is not sure if Pilecki will be found at Powazki cemetery because it is not the only such clandestine site in Warsaw or the rest of Poland.

    But his place in history is gradually being restored. A street in Warsaw is now named after him, as are some schools across the country.

    He found communist prison harder to endure than Auschwitz. A fellow inmate described seeing him in prison slumped, unable to raise his head because his collar bones had been broken. At his show trial, he was hiding his hands because his fingernails had been ripped out during torture.

    At one court session, he told his wife Maria that the secret security torture had sapped his will to go on.

    "I can live no longer," he said.

    Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/volun...#ixzz256GUB4J5

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Frequent Flyer;
    He was "exceptionally courageous," said Jacek Pawlowicz, a historian with Warsaw's Institute of National Remembrance.
    To say the least!

    Spend some time in Europe and you'll soon realize that from the 1930s to 1945 millions-upon-millions of people, from every ethnic/national group, there and in Russia were slaughtered.


  3. #3
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    He found communist prison harder to endure than Auschwitz. A fellow inmate described seeing him in prison slumped, unable to raise his head because his collar bones had been broken. At his show trial, he was hiding his hands because his fingernails had been ripped out during torture.

    At one court session, he told his wife Maria that the secret security torture had sapped his will to go on.

    "I can live no longer," he said.


    Found this part especially interesting. Apparently, the commies were worse than the Nazis. Yet, today, while Nazis are universally hated and seen for what they are, its still cool to be a commie in some circles.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by quantum View Post
    [B]Found this part especially interesting. Apparently, the commies were worse than the Nazis. Yet, today, while Nazis are universally hated and seen for what they are, its still cool to be a commie in some circles.
    Witold Pilecki is the kind of guy Frank Marshall Davis and young Barry talked about derisively while espousing the awesomeness of the Soviet Union--- in between sodomy sessions.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbanyJet View Post
    To say the least!

    Spend some time in Europe and you'll soon realize that from the 1930s to 1945 millions-upon-millions of people, from every ethnic/national group, there and in Russia were slaughtered.

    Whenever I find myself in a situation where I'm feeling miserable, I think about amazing people like Witold Pilecki and it just pulls me right through.

    Raoul Wallenberg was another hero who risked his own life to save thousands from the nazis, only to be murdered by the communists after the war:

    http://my.news.yahoo.com/sweden-reme...052828086.html

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by quantum View Post
    He found communist prison harder to endure than Auschwitz. A fellow inmate described seeing him in prison slumped, unable to raise his head because his collar bones had been broken. At his show trial, he was hiding his hands because his fingernails had been ripped out during torture.

    At one court session, he told his wife Maria that the secret security torture had sapped his will to go on.

    "I can live no longer," he said.


    Found this part especially interesting. Apparently, the commies were worse than the Nazis. Yet, today, while Nazis are universally hated and seen for what they are, its still cool to be a commie in the present white house.

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