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Thread: Buffalo News: Bills prepare for Wildcat package

  1. #1

    Buffalo News: Bills prepare for Wildcat package

    How Jets utilize the offense is guesswork

    Updated: September 3, 2012, 7:58 AM

    The Buffalo Bills have a plan to prepare for the New York Jets' single-wing offense, widely known as the Wildcat.

    The Jets have yet to unveil their Wildcat package or divulge how they plan to use multi-purpose quarterback Tim Tebow within it.

    So the Bills will take their stack of Miami Dolphins scouting reports, place them next to their Denver Broncos scouting reports and shuffle them together like a deck of cards. Then the Bills will have two former Wildcat operatives help review the data.

    Tebow was a gadget that helped Denver reach the second round of the playoffs last season. The Jets' new offensive coordinator, Tony Sparano, was Miami's head coach who started a Wildcat craze in 2008.

    Their track records should give Buffalo's defense plenty of information to at least formulate an educated guess for Sunday's season opener at the Meadowlands.

    "Anything they're doing is not new," Bills linebacker Nick Barnett said. "It's the NFL, and everything's been done before, and it'll be done again.

    "The things you prepare for are the history. What that offensive coordinator's done mixed with what [the Jets] did last year. Obviously, there are going to be some new plays they haven't done, but Tebow has done a lot of those things in Denver. A lot of the things he was successful at in Denver, I'm sure they won't vacate those."

    The Bills will have two qualified minds to help them digest those combined scouting reports. Quarterbacks coach David Lee is the assistant who introduced Sparano to the Wildcat in the first place. Lee ran the package as the offensive coordinator at Arkansas.

    Backup quarterback Brad Smith ran the Wildcat package for the Jets before he joined the Bills as a free agent last year.

    Given the connections, New York will be able to compile a similar dossier of Wildcat guesswork about Buffalo.

    "The great thing is you don't know if we're going to run it once," Jets coach Rex Ryan said. "You don't know if we're going to run it 20 times, 50 times, whatever. That's up to us, and if you're not prepared for it, why wouldn't we run it? If you're not defending it well, why wouldn't we keep running it?"
    Sunday's opener will feature two offenses that have stated a commitment to the Wildcat at a time when its popularity appears to have waned league-wide.

    The Wildcat became a fad after the Dolphins sprung it on the New England Patriots in 2008 -- with devastating results.

    The Dolphins were coming off a 1-15 campaign and started the season with two ugly losses. With nothing to lose, Sparano agreed to deploy Lee's exotic offense. The Dolphins used it to beat the Patriots 38-13 and went on to win the AFC East.

    In Miami's package, the quarterback would split wide like a receiver, leaving a running back in shotgun formation. Another back, lined up in the slot, would sprint in motion toward the middle of the field. The center would time his snap so defenses wouldn't know which running back had the ball.

    When other teams tried to install versions of the Wildcat, they quickly discovered it was crucial to throw out of the formation. Otherwise, defenses would crowd the line to snuff the run. Dolphins running back Ronnie Brown was a threat to pass.

    "Even if they come out in something we've never seen, you're automatically thinking it's going to be a run," Bills cornerback Terrence McGee said.

    "They really didn't show any of it in preseason. So you just kind of assume. There are only certain things you can do with the Wildcat anyway. You just go out with an idea of what they were doing in Miami and what they did in Denver and then adjust to what we see."

    That's why the Bills and the Jets have scrambling quarterbacks as their Wildcat triggermen. They can keep defenses honest on their heels.

    A significant benefit of the Wildcat is forcing your opponent to dedicate large chunks of precious practice and meeting time to strategize for it.

    "I think it takes a lot of your time," Ryan said. "There's some guys who say it'll take a third of the practice. Some guys say it will take less than that. I don't know if it's that much, but I know it's on your mind."

    http://www.buffalonews.com/sports/bi...cle1037441.ece

  2. #2
    scheme is one thing... have the players to execute is another..... running the ball effectively when the entire stadium knows u are going to run the ball is key.... Same goes for Passing. Best teams are going to be able to execute their offense when down and distance dictate pass or run....

    Not sure how effective wildcat or QB Option wil be for Jets w/ Tebow..

    but like notion of running in red zone and short yardage...

    It definitely adds to game planning for opposing team...

  3. #3
    I know alot of us jets fans are wondering and anticipating just how the wildcat is applied to their game plan. I personally think it is more of a smokescreen than anything but it will all depend how the new ground n pound offense works out. If they have success running the football and passing then I don't see them even doing any wildcat plays but if Buffalo or any team for that matter decides to not worry about defensing the wildcat and the jets offense is sputtering then we will see some plays it's that simple. Lets hope we don't see much of it other than third and short situations like we had when Smith was our wildcat guy.

  4. #4
    Hopefully, if Sparano and Rex are smart, our "Wildcat" will only distantly resemble what tey ran in Denver last year, or what Miami, the Jets and Buffalo have done in the past.

  5. #5
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    ... our redzone / short yardage O wasn't very pretty in preseason ... so we certainly could use some new stufff there ...

    ... that being said, buffalo is probably the team most able to handle it well with their coaches & smith ... would be interesting to have it mostly left in the bag until Pitt week 2 ...







    l_j_r

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    I have to agree with the guys from Buffalo. It's not 2008 anymore- the wildcat isn't going to stun anybody no matter what they do. That being said, it is nice hearing opposing defenses at least considering something a potential threat from the Jets offense.

  7. #7
    Have they prepared Fitzpatrick for Coples? QC is a big, hungry dog and it's almost dinner time.

    Quinton Coples, Ball So Hard University.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Green&White51 View Post
    I have to agree with the guys from Buffalo. It's not 2008 anymore- the wildcat isn't going to stun anybody no matter what they do. That being said, it is nice hearing opposing defenses at least considering something a potential threat from the Jets offense.
    Not to mention, the Bills have been running the Wildcat for 3 years now and have played in Miami's division forever. I'm pretty sure their defense knows how to defend it

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by McGinley View Post
    Have they prepared Fitzpatrick for Coples? QC is a big, hungry dog and it's almost dinner time.

    Quinton Coples, Ball So Hard University.
    LOL. You mean the guy complaining about having to play too much?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by McGinley View Post
    Have they prepared Fitzpatrick for Coples? QC is a big, hungry dog and it's almost dinner time.

    Quinton Coples, Ball So Hard University.
    +1

    How great would it be to read stories like this in the future about opposing offensive coordinators game planing for 98? Man I hope the pre-season success carries over.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by daquix View Post
    LOL. You mean the guy complaining about having to play too much?
    Do your research. He wasn't complaining.

    And have you seen him play? I doubt it since the game probably confuses you which is why you need reporters to tell you how things went.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by McGinley View Post
    Do your research. He wasn't complaining.

    And have you seen him play? I doubt it since the game probably confuses you which is why you need reporters to tell you how things went.
    LOL. Ok Bud.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by daquix View Post
    LOL. Ok Bud.
    Quix not watching the guy play confirmed.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
    Hopefully, if Sparano and Rex are smart, our "Wildcat" will only distantly resemble what tey ran in Denver last year, or what Miami, the Jets and Buffalo have done in the past.
    You have a problem with brad Smith's success in the wildcat with the jets?

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by revischrist View Post
    You have a problem with brad Smith's success in the wildcat with the jets?
    Not at all. I'm just hoping that Sparano comes out with something different, instead of just dusting off some old plays that everyone has already seen countless times, and know how to defend for the most part.

    I'm one of those guys who believes that Option football, especially the Spread Option, can work in the NFL, and that opposing teams just won't be ready for it, nor will they easily be able to stop it.
    Last edited by Demosthenes9; 09-03-2012 at 03:51 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
    Hopefully, if Sparano and Rex are smart, our "Wildcat" will only distantly resemble what tey ran in Denver last year, or what Miami, the Jets and Buffalo have done in the past.
    Not for nothing but if it doesnt look like the Denver offense from last year, and it doesnt look like the Dolphin or Jets wildcat what the hell else is left for the wildcat look? Some you guys are making this out to be some complex offense with a ton of different looks, there is a reason that this type of offense is not used a primary scheme, it has limited looks and options.

    And please do not use the term "our" when referring to the Jets ever again. As stated in other threads you are not a Jet fan and are a Tebow fan. Did you refer to the Broncos last year as "your" team as well?

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by sec.101row23 View Post
    Not for nothing but if it doesnt look like the Denver offense from last year, and it doesnt look like the Dolphin or Jets wildcat what the hell else is left for the wildcat look? Some you guys are making this out to be some complex offense with a ton of different looks, there is a reason that this type of offense is not used a primary scheme, it has limited looks and options.

    And please do not use the term "our" when referring to the Jets ever again. As stated in other threads you are not a Jet fan and are a Tebow fan. Did you refer to the Broncos last year as "your" team as well?
    Last first. I'll use OUR to refer to plans that OUR team is going to use because I am a fan and a supporter of OUR team. Again, YOU are not the arbiter of whom is, or isn't a fan.

    The "wildcat" used by Miami and others was simply linking a RB up for the direct snap, usually sending the QB out wide, having an unbalanced line and using a flanker. Most often, the RB was standing alone behind center. That's a formation with serious limitations.

    For the most part, what Denver did last year was to add in a couple of Read Option plays. Tebow in the shotgun, a RB standing to one side or the other. Inside zone/read, outside zone/read.

    Going deeper down the hole and running an actual Spread Option changes things quite a bit. It takes defenders out of the box for starters. It makes the defense decide whether to defend the run or the pass. There are so many varied looks that you can give a defense that they really won't know what's coming.

    Really beautiful thing is that it doesn't take much practice time for the offense to install these kinds of plays as they all are built on the same framework/fundamentals.

    And no, this type of offense does not have limited looks and options, that's the point

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
    Last first. I'll use OUR to refer to plans that OUR team is going to use because I am a fan and a supporter of OUR team. Again, YOU are not the arbiter of whom is, or isn't a fan.
    You came here from the Broncos after Tebow got traded here, and you'll leave with him when he gets traded elsewhere. You're not a Jets fan, you're a Tebow fan.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by McGinley View Post
    You came here from the Broncos after Tebow got traded here, and you'll leave with him when he gets traded elsewhere. You're not a Jets fan, you're a Tebow fan.
    If you all wish to continue that fight, start a ****ing thread about it and I'll go head to head with you there, instead of cluttering up other threads and spoiling what could be good discussions.

    Now, if you want to talk about Buffalo preparing for OUR team's Wildcat, by all means, go ahead and join in.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
    Last first. I'll use OUR to refer to plans that OUR team is going to use because I am a fan and a supporter of OUR team. Again, YOU are not the arbiter of whom is, or isn't a fan.

    The "wildcat" used by Miami and others was simply linking a RB up for the direct snap, usually sending the QB out wide, having an unbalanced line and using a flanker. Most often, the RB was standing alone behind center. That's a formation with serious limitations.

    For the most part, what Denver did last year was to add in a couple of Read Option plays. Tebow in the shotgun, a RB standing to one side or the other. Inside zone/read, outside zone/read.

    Going deeper down the hole and running an actual Spread Option changes things quite a bit. It takes defenders out of the box for starters. It makes the defense decide whether to defend the run or the pass. There are so many varied looks that you can give a defense that they really won't know what's coming.

    Really beautiful thing is that it doesn't take much practice time for the offense to install these kinds of plays as they all are built on the same framework/fundamentals.

    And no, this type of offense does not have limited looks and options, that's the point

    I think I can speak for a lot of long time Jet fans who think you are a fraud and again, NOT a Jet fan but a fan of only one player. Do you still post on "your" old teams website, the Denver Broncos and refer to them as "your" team still??

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