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Thread: Most Wins in NFL During Rex's Tenure

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    What sent the Jets on the 15 year turnaround we're experiencing right now was an owner that suddenly grew balls, suddenly got ruthless, and raped the New England Patriots of the best head coach in the NFL. Turns out all it takes is a slap on the wrist and a few draft picks.

    So, hmm.......I'll take Coughlin, Belichick, McCarthy, Tomlin, Harbaugh x2, Fisher, or Shanahan.

    SAR I
    Yes, the coach who made the playoffs once in three years. Who's team, according to your idiotic logic, sh1t the bed in the playoffs one year, won only one playoff game in his tenure and who's stupid coaching cost them a chance of making the playoffs the two other seasons.

    That HC?

    But hey, youre just trolling and hijacked another thread.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatsFanTX View Post
    2010 was legitimate, especially with the wins in Foxboro and Indy.

    2009 was a fluke, beginning how the Jets even got into the playoffs. Then in their first playoff game against the Chargers, you had an All Pro kicker missing 3 easy FG's.
    True but not every kick is Adam Vinitieri - kickers will miss. He had a terrible game and that was a plus for the Jets.

  3. #63
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    I still stand by the philosphy of there are 32 teams in the NFL. If you don't like the team you are currently following you can find another one. The same way people don't like PSLs or anyting else about the team - the good news is you have a choice!!

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by PatsFanTX View Post
    2010 was legitimate, especially with the wins in Foxboro and Indy.

    2009 was a fluke, beginning how the Jets even got into the playoffs. Then in their first playoff game against the Chargers, you had an All Pro kicker missing 3 easy FG's.
    oh man, that's rich.

    a Pasts* fan talking about whether or not our playoff wins were "legitimate."


    not SAR/Kenmore level rich, but rich nonetheless.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by djaparz View Post
    Really i can rememeer Strahan and his defensive olayers not liking the getting to meeting earlier and what not.
    Oh dear. This happened early in the season in 2004, Coughlin's first year with the Giants. So your argument is Coughlin lost the team as soon as he got there? That's called transition.

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    What sent the Jets on the 15 year turnaround we're experiencing right now was an owner that suddenly grew balls, suddenly got ruthless, and raped the New England Patriots of the best head coach in the NFL. Turns out all it takes is a slap on the wrist and a few draft picks.

    So, hmm.......I'll take Coughlin, Belichick, McCarthy, Tomlin, Harbaugh x2, Fisher, or Shanahan.

    SAR I
    yes, because McCarthy, Tomlin and Harbaugh x2 were highly-experienced NFL head coaches when they got their current gigs.


    shine on, you crazy diamond

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatsFanTX View Post
    No Reid or Kubiak?
    Andy Reid is the older Rex Ryan without the foot fetish, no thanks. Wins just enough to keep him employed, can't win the big one.

    Kubiak not so high on.

    SAR I

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by PatsFanTX View Post
    No Reid or Kubiak?
    Kubiak?

  9. #69
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    Only guys I would take over Rex are the Harbaughs and Tomlin. F*ck no to Beli, Coughlin is a HoFer but he is old. McCarthy went from Favre to Rodgers so his success is skewed.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    This is even worse though, because Coughlin had to go through the exact same issues with a young QB, impaitient fans and media, and locker room infighting and he realized he needed to change his ways.

    EXACTLY what Rex is trying to do.

    Some people just like being an internet blowhard.
    What Rex is "trying" to do? LOL.

    "I'm going to be quiet this year"

    "I didn't want to draft that bum Hill."

    "I'm going to get more involved in the offense this year."

    "Ask Tony Sparano, I don't know what that Wildcat thing is or what he's planning."

    "I'm going to take the targets off the players backs."

    "This is the best Jets team I've had so far."

    "It's my responsibility to know what's going on with my team and be a leader."

    "We are going to a Leadership Meeting being run by an outsider at Woody Johnson's house."

    "I'm not going to have captains this year. That was a big mistake, having captains. Pushed the team apart, can't play favorites."

    "I've invited only the team leaders to the Leadership Meeting I've outsourced at Woody Johnson's house."

    Just keep changin' Rex, just keep changin'.

    SAR I

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtstar View Post
    yes, because McCarthy, Tomlin and Harbaugh x2 were highly-experienced NFL head coaches when they got their current gigs.

    shine on, you crazy diamond
    There definitely are cases of rookie head coaches becoming great. Rex Ryan isn't one of them.

    SAR I

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    What sent the Jets on the 15 year turnaround we're experiencing right now was an owner that suddenly grew balls, suddenly got ruthless, and raped the New England Patriots of the best head coach in the NFL. Turns out all it takes is a slap on the wrist and a few draft picks.

    So, hmm.......I'll take Coughlin, Belichick, McCarthy, Tomlin, Harbaugh x2, Fisher, or Shanahan.

    SAR I
    great thanks for the list. i'll try to forward this on to Woody.

    for now, i'll hope that Rex can make this season enjoyable.

  13. #73
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    Which bonehead would want Rex fired after 3 seasons....none of them losing????? which doofus! lol I mean seriosuly!



    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    Here are the only teams that have more wins then the Jets since Rex took over.

    Saints, Packers, Patriots, Ravens and Steelers

    The fact that people want him fired is beyond ridiculous.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by SAR I View Post
    What Rex is "trying" to do? LOL.

    "I'm going to be quiet this year"

    "I didn't want to draft that bum Hill."

    "I'm going to get more involved in the offense this year."

    "Ask Tony Sparano, I don't know what that Wildcat thing is or what he's planning."

    "I'm going to take the targets off the players backs."

    "This is the best Jets team I've had so far."

    "It's my responsibility to know what's going on with my team and be a leader."

    "We are going to a Leadership Meeting being run by an outsider at Woody Johnson's house."

    "I'm not going to have captains this year. That was a big mistake, having captains. Pushed the team apart, can't play favorites."

    "I've invited only the team leaders to the Leadership Meeting I've outsourced at Woody Johnson's house."

    Just keep changin' Rex, just keep changin'.

    SAR I
    Intellingent, factual post. Looks like something a 10 year old would respond with.

    Whats the matter, couldnt respond to my facts about coughlin losing his team in 2006, learning from in and winning the SB?

    Well played blowhard, well played

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsfreak View Post
    Which bonehead would want Rex fired after 3 seasons....none of them losing????? which doofus! lol I mean seriosuly!
    Bonehead Doofus here, little tidbit for ya:

    Al Groh
    Herman Edwards
    Eric Mangini
    Rex Ryan

    All of them averaged a 9-7 record with a healthy quarterback. All of them. All. Of. Them.

    Not a single bum on this list made it in the NFL. Even the two who got second-looks were colossal busts. This is Rex's last season, might even be his last 6 or 7 games. Enjoy it while it lasts.

    SAR I

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    Intellingent, factual post. Looks like something a 10 year old would respond with.

    Whats the matter, couldnt respond to my facts about coughlin losing his team in 2006, learning from in and winning the SB?

    Well played blowhard, well played
    I didn't see any "facts" that suggested Coughlin lost his team. The crux of your argument seems to be high penalty totals the '06 team had. It was well-known that Tiki Barber didn't like Coughlin but he liked him no less in '06 than he had in '05. If you're talking about Coughlin losing Tiki, I guess you're right but he also had his best years from '04-'06. So I don't know. The team had been ravaged by injuries in '06. I think that had more to do with it.

  17. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by OlTimeGiantFanFromLongAgo View Post
    I didn't see any "facts" that suggested Coughlin lost his team. The crux of your argument seems to be high penalty totals the '06 team had. It was well-known that Tiki Barber didn't like Coughlin but he liked him no less in '06 than he had in '05. If you're talking about Coughlin losing Tiki, I guess you're right but he also had his best years from '04-'06. So I don't know. The team had been ravaged by injuries in '06. I think that had more to do with it.
    November 30, 2006


    Add Dash of Strahan to Turmoil and Watch Giants Boil Over

    By JOHN BRANCH


    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Nov. 29 — It does not take much for the smoldering Giants to turn combustible — a couple of losses, a star running back criticizing the coaches, a fourth-quarter meltdown of historic proportions.

    On Wednesday, just as the Giants began preparing for the biggest game of the season, along came an injured star player, carrying dynamite in his pockets.

    Defensive end Michael Strahan, who had a chance to defuse an evolving he-said, he-said that Strahan started with receiver Plaxico Burress, instead turned the episode into the latest potentially divisive controversy for the Giants.

    More than anything, it demonstrated just how low things can go for the Giants, losers of three games in a row, and how absurd things can get when a good team goes bad, particularly in New York, where the media coverage is larger and noisier than anywhere else.

    Even Coach Tom Coughlin gave credence to the team’s latest fissure. He said that he knew about the comments that Strahan made on the radio Monday about Burress’s occasional lapses in effort.

    “I was aware that a statement had been made, and what I’m trying to do right now, quite frankly, is pull everybody together and encourage,” said Coughlin, who over the past week has been reminding his players to keep complaints and criticisms in house. “I think it’s important that everyone take a stand, from the team standpoint.”

    Minutes later, in the locker room, Burress said he was unaware of Strahan’s comments. Upon hearing some excerpts, he admitted that the words stung.

    Strahan, realizing that the story was gaining momentum, walked into the locker room about 20 minutes later. Rather than clarify his comments, he lashed out, accusing reporters of trying to divide the team.

    The Giants (6-5) are left trying to piece themselves together in time for Sunday’s home game against the division-leading Dallas Cowboys (7-4), winners of three games in a row.

    To do so will require more than the usual game planning, or even duct tape and wire. Last week, after the Giants had lost consecutive games, running back Tiki Barber criticized the team’s play-calling, earning a curt response from Coughlin. On Sunday, the Giants became only the third team in N.F.L. history to blow a 21-point lead or larger in the final 10 minutes of a game, falling, 24-21, to the Tennessee Titans.

    The latest loss came amid a riot of mistakes, including an intercepted pass from quarterback Eli Manning as Burress stopped running his route. Burress, for the second time in three games, appeared less than assertive in attempting the post-interception tackle.

    Strahan has missed the past three games with a sprained foot, and did not travel with the team during its recent games against the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Titans. On Monday, he was asked by the WFAN talk-show host Joe Benigno about Burress.

    “It’s a shame, because Plaxico is a great player and he’s a good guy to be around,” Strahan said. “But, at the same time, you’re judged by your actions out there on the field. And you can’t give up, you can’t quit, because you’re not quitting on yourself, you’re quitting on us, you’re quitting on everybody.”

    He added: “He’s too great of a player to have people look at him and think: ‘Oh, he’s a quitter. He doesn’t finish. He doesn’t try hard.’ He’s too good of a player for that, because we all see what he does, what he can do.”

    Coughlin, too, had been critical of Burress, and it seemed a relatively benign story line until an ESPN reporter, Kelly Naqi, asked to talk to Strahan on Wednesday about his Burress comments. Strahan told Naqi that he speaks to reporters only on Thursdays.

    She then asked Burress for a response and highlighted a few of the more inflaming phrases Strahan had uttered.

    “That is tough to hear someone say that about you,” Burress said. “You know me, I don’t get into the aspect of criticizing teammates. I have always stayed in my place. I have never called out anybody. I don’t call out names. I don’t get into that. If that is the way he feels, then I want to talk to him personally.”

    Burress said it was the first he had heard of Strahan’s comments, and he had not spoken to Strahan.

    Strahan entered the locker room about 20 minutes later, after Burress had gone, about five minutes before it closed to reporters, who stood several deep around his locker.

    Strahan walked to the middle of the scrum. Naqi, near the back, asked whether he had spoken with Burress about his comments two days earlier.

    Strahan angrily told her to come forward.

    “Look a man in the eye before you try to kill him or make up something,” he said. “Look me in the eyes.”

    She walked forward and repeated the question. Strahan went on a raised-voice diatribe.

    “We’re 6-5; we’ve lost three games in a row,” Strahan said. “What do you want us to do? Put our heads down and go into a corner? We don’t do that. We’re men. We get back, we practice hard, we prepare for plays to win. We don’t prepare to come in to have someone who wants to take a comment and try to divide teammates in a way that it just disrupts this team, because we don’t have that division here. So if you want to come here with the negative, you’re coming to the wrong guy, because I’m not a negative guy. I don’t kill my teammates. I’m a man, and I talk to my teammates.”

    He was gone in less than three minutes, declining to address his comments about Burress on the way out.

    And in a season already soiled, but still salvageable, the Giants were left with another mess to clean.

  18. #78
    Mon Dec 25, 2006 at 07:35 AM PST.

    Why Tom Coughlin Is An Undisciplined Blowhard


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    Tom Coughlin, the head coach of the New York football Giants and former head coach of the Jacksonville Jaguars, is portrayed by those in the football world as the symbol of what discipline means. To me, Tom Coughlin mostly symbolizes what discipline is NOT. By attacking Coughlin I am attacking a sacred cow for those who don't follow football. Once again we have a values clash.

    For starters, I don't like Coughlin but the man is highly intelligent. He can memorize large amounts of data. By all accounts the man is generally organized, healthy, and articulate. To his credit he apparently does good charity work. I'm not denying his strengths. Coughlin is also notorious for having an excessive amount of rules reminiscent of Wahibi Islam or Koreshian type cults. They include fines for players who show up 5 minutes early for meetings (this is considered late in Coughlin world) as well as fines for the silliest of so called infractions.


    They call him "a no nonsense guy." I call him a bullying blowhard who yells way too much at others. They call him a man who "sticks to his principles." I call him a rigid ignoramus unable to adapt to changing situations. They say he's a "tough guy." I say he's morally weak and a coward. So is he the symbol of discipline that the tough guys in the NFL claim or is he the symbol of a man who lacks discipline?

    Discipline does require structure, limits, and rules. However, discipline also requires fairness, legitimate input from those who you are in charge of, and human decency. The latter criteria of what discipline constitutes is why Tom Coughlin is undisciplined.

    Discipline is not about bullying others to conform to your rigid way of life. If your rules are insane, you can not have discipline. If your rules are unfair, you can not have discipline. If you are a bully, you can not have discipline. If you continually create a culture of fear instead of a culture of respect, you can not have discipline.

    The New York Giants are one of the most talented teams in the NFL. I am a Giants fan and a team with their great defensive line, strong special teams, a great running back, excellent receivers in Burress and Shockey, and an above average QB in Eli Manning should be 10-5 right now based on talent, perhaps even 12-3. Instead the Giants are 7-8. The reason is Tom Coughlin.

    Having watched the Giants all year here is what I've seen.
    1. More false starts and untimely penalties than any team in the NFL.
    2. A plethora of stupid personal fouls which have cost the team at least two games this year.
    3. Stupid turnovers at crucial times.
    4. Bad mental decisions by players at crucial times.
    5. Failing to make a tackle which cost the team one game.
    6. Failure to recognize that a play was still live, leading to a 108 yard missed FG return for a touchdown.
    7. Panicky control of time management leading to poor decisions in the final two minutes of games.

    If one of the 7 things above happened once a year, you would not blame the coach. However, when all these things keep happening to the same team, you have to look at coaching. When players are mistreated, when players are treated unfairly, when players are constantly being yelled at unnecessarily, the likelihood of losing focus or panicking in a pressure situation increases exponentially because the player is acting out of fear instead of control.

    What is and what is not discipline is something we as progressives should not hesitate to define. I'm not claiming perfection for I am disciplined enough to know that I am not always right.

  19. #79
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    Kubiak?
    Kubiak is similiar to Rex in that he is great at one side of the ball. Where Kubiak is smarter then rex is that he made a great hire on the side of the ball he knows nothing about(Wade Phillips). Rex hires the meatball Tony Sparano. DOH!

  20. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglenj View Post
    November 30, 2006


    Add Dash of Strahan to Turmoil and Watch Giants Boil Over

    By JOHN BRANCH


    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Nov. 29 — It does not take much for the smoldering Giants to turn combustible — a couple of losses, a star running back criticizing the coaches, a fourth-quarter meltdown of historic proportions.

    On Wednesday, just as the Giants began preparing for the biggest game of the season, along came an injured star player, carrying dynamite in his pockets.

    Defensive end Michael Strahan, who had a chance to defuse an evolving he-said, he-said that Strahan started with receiver Plaxico Burress, instead turned the episode into the latest potentially divisive controversy for the Giants.

    More than anything, it demonstrated just how low things can go for the Giants, losers of three games in a row, and how absurd things can get when a good team goes bad, particularly in New York, where the media coverage is larger and noisier than anywhere else.

    Even Coach Tom Coughlin gave credence to the team’s latest fissure. He said that he knew about the comments that Strahan made on the radio Monday about Burress’s occasional lapses in effort.

    “I was aware that a statement had been made, and what I’m trying to do right now, quite frankly, is pull everybody together and encourage,” said Coughlin, who over the past week has been reminding his players to keep complaints and criticisms in house. “I think it’s important that everyone take a stand, from the team standpoint.”

    Minutes later, in the locker room, Burress said he was unaware of Strahan’s comments. Upon hearing some excerpts, he admitted that the words stung.

    Strahan, realizing that the story was gaining momentum, walked into the locker room about 20 minutes later. Rather than clarify his comments, he lashed out, accusing reporters of trying to divide the team.

    The Giants (6-5) are left trying to piece themselves together in time for Sunday’s home game against the division-leading Dallas Cowboys (7-4), winners of three games in a row.

    To do so will require more than the usual game planning, or even duct tape and wire. Last week, after the Giants had lost consecutive games, running back Tiki Barber criticized the team’s play-calling, earning a curt response from Coughlin. On Sunday, the Giants became only the third team in N.F.L. history to blow a 21-point lead or larger in the final 10 minutes of a game, falling, 24-21, to the Tennessee Titans.

    The latest loss came amid a riot of mistakes, including an intercepted pass from quarterback Eli Manning as Burress stopped running his route. Burress, for the second time in three games, appeared less than assertive in attempting the post-interception tackle.

    Strahan has missed the past three games with a sprained foot, and did not travel with the team during its recent games against the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Titans. On Monday, he was asked by the WFAN talk-show host Joe Benigno about Burress.

    “It’s a shame, because Plaxico is a great player and he’s a good guy to be around,” Strahan said. “But, at the same time, you’re judged by your actions out there on the field. And you can’t give up, you can’t quit, because you’re not quitting on yourself, you’re quitting on us, you’re quitting on everybody.”

    He added: “He’s too great of a player to have people look at him and think: ‘Oh, he’s a quitter. He doesn’t finish. He doesn’t try hard.’ He’s too good of a player for that, because we all see what he does, what he can do.”

    Coughlin, too, had been critical of Burress, and it seemed a relatively benign story line until an ESPN reporter, Kelly Naqi, asked to talk to Strahan on Wednesday about his Burress comments. Strahan told Naqi that he speaks to reporters only on Thursdays.

    She then asked Burress for a response and highlighted a few of the more inflaming phrases Strahan had uttered.

    “That is tough to hear someone say that about you,” Burress said. “You know me, I don’t get into the aspect of criticizing teammates. I have always stayed in my place. I have never called out anybody. I don’t call out names. I don’t get into that. If that is the way he feels, then I want to talk to him personally.”

    Burress said it was the first he had heard of Strahan’s comments, and he had not spoken to Strahan.

    Strahan entered the locker room about 20 minutes later, after Burress had gone, about five minutes before it closed to reporters, who stood several deep around his locker.

    Strahan walked to the middle of the scrum. Naqi, near the back, asked whether he had spoken with Burress about his comments two days earlier.

    Strahan angrily told her to come forward.

    “Look a man in the eye before you try to kill him or make up something,” he said. “Look me in the eyes.”

    She walked forward and repeated the question. Strahan went on a raised-voice diatribe.

    “We’re 6-5; we’ve lost three games in a row,” Strahan said. “What do you want us to do? Put our heads down and go into a corner? We don’t do that. We’re men. We get back, we practice hard, we prepare for plays to win. We don’t prepare to come in to have someone who wants to take a comment and try to divide teammates in a way that it just disrupts this team, because we don’t have that division here. So if you want to come here with the negative, you’re coming to the wrong guy, because I’m not a negative guy. I don’t kill my teammates. I’m a man, and I talk to my teammates.”

    He was gone in less than three minutes, declining to address his comments about Burress on the way out.

    And in a season already soiled, but still salvageable, the Giants were left with another mess to clean.
    What you left out, is that team, with every chance to "fire" its coach by going in the tank at 7-8 and miss the playoffs, beat Washington the last game of the year to go to the playoffs. They then took Philadelphia to overtime on the road in the first round. Was there in-fighting? Probably. Did Burress quit on that route? Yes. Did Coughlin's team stop playing for him? No.

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