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Thread: TE Blocking

  1. #1

    TE Blocking

    Ryan singled out the run-blocking play of the tight ends, and said of Dustin Keller in particular that he may have had his best run-blocking game ever.

    Just rewatching the game, and snapshot a few plays from the Jets first touchdown drive (sorry for image quality). By no means a definitive account, but I noticed one bad and one mediocre block by Keller. First the bad one:

    Here you can see Shonn Greene's going to run outside the left tackle. Keller is the blocking end on that side. Unfortunately, his man beats him to the point of attack, and though Keller does a fine job holding the block, he gets zero push and so is holding it behind the line of scrimmage, right in the way of Brandon Moore, who is the pulling guard. Moore has to take three full steps around him, and fails to get to his block in time. Greene is eaten up for a one-yard loss.





    Keller does a better job here, again on a run to the left side, this time matched up with the Colts SS Zbikowski. Keller beats Zbikowski to the spot and rides him the entire play, even after Greene has gone down after securing the first.







    In general I thought Keller looked okay. Konrad Reuland had a couple of real nice blocks, including this one, where he came in motion to the inside in a single-back set, and opened that "ISO" door right up, sealing the left side of the play with Vlad Ducasse while Moore pulled around and sealed the right side. This was Greene's first big gainer for 21 yards. Look at that hole.



    Reuland also had a couple of nice blocks out of that "full house" look that Sparano was running all game. Cumberland, not so much. He frequently ran into the garbage and got lost in it. Haven't seen one real impact block.

  2. #2
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    Good analysis. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Tackleem View Post
    In general I thought Keller looked okay. Konrad Reuland had a couple of real nice blocks, including this one, where he came in motion to the inside in a single-back set, and opened that "ISO" door right up, sealing the left side of the play with Vlad Ducasse while Moore pulled around and sealed the right side. This was Greene's first big gainer for 21 yards. Look at that hole.
    Thanks for the post!

    Did you really mean Ducasse? I don't seem him in the picture you posted.

  4. #4
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    Great analysis, thanks for the post.


    I feel as though that the full house formation could potentially be a good look for moving forward because it matches our personnel in the backfield and on the line rather well.



    This is the base of the fullhouse for people who are not familiar with it.




    This formation is espcially usefull for the isoblocks that the OP mentioned. The iso, again for those unfamiliar with football technicalities, typically is a man blocking scheme where an offense will insert their second level player onto a defensive second level player at the point of attack.

    Take a look at this very basic Fullhouse formation play:



    Here, the key element is the inclusion of an H-back. The H-back can block, run, or go out for a pass here. True jack of all trades, master of none postion.

    One thing that has always bothered about the Jets use of Keller is their reluctance to use him as an H-back, which I thought he would be used as more when drafted.

    If we can put Greene back there will Keller and someone like Hilliard then some real cool plays can be run out of the formation. Different swing passes, exotic blocks, ect.

    Now, what else could be cool out of this formation would be the inclusion of tebow. We could potentially play Greene*, Keller, and Tebow, three playmakers (*I'm using the term playmaker lightly here), all in the same backfield.


    So we would have those three in the backfield, with Sanchez at QB. This would be a very effective formation to run or pass out of.

  5. #5
    ^ Except with Mark, we need a Max-Protect on Passing Downs.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    ^ Except with Mark, we need a Max-Protect on Passing Downs.
    Well, you can technically still allow for a max protect with the full house. Just keep two of them back there. The advantage comes into play because the defense doesn't know who is doing what.


    You could also have a back run a delayed route, where they feign blocking and then go out to the flats or stay back for normally 2-3 seconds to check the blitz situation (if there is no blitz, they run a route). This is especially useful because of the in play adjustments the D makes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin View Post
    ^ Except with Mark, we need a Max-Protect on Passing Downs.
    Or... we could... roll him to the outside....

    I know, i know, Sparano would have me hung for even suggesting the idea.

    But it could work.

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    I'm calling BS! I don't know about Keller, but the few times Mark was under immediate pressure it was because Cumberland totally whiffed on his assignment. Cumberland's pass blocking was horrible. That is why Rex specified "run-blocking." He must have been livid after watching the tape of those plays. Maybe Cumberland's run blocking was satisfactory...
    Last edited by RoadFan; 10-15-2012 at 07:41 PM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ListerFiend View Post
    Great analysis, thanks for the post.


    I feel as though that the full house formation could potentially be a good look for moving forward because it matches our personnel in the backfield and on the line rather well.



    This is the base of the fullhouse for people who are not familiar with it.




    This formation is espcially usefull for the isoblocks that the OP mentioned. The iso, again for those unfamiliar with football technicalities, typically is a man blocking scheme where an offense will insert their second level player onto a defensive second level player at the point of attack.

    Take a look at this very basic Fullhouse formation play:



    Here, the key element is the inclusion of an H-back. The H-back can block, run, or go out for a pass here. True jack of all trades, master of none postion.

    One thing that has always bothered about the Jets use of Keller is their reluctance to use him as an H-back, which I thought he would be used as more when drafted.

    If we can put Greene back there will Keller and someone like Hilliard then some real cool plays can be run out of the formation. Different swing passes, exotic blocks, ect.

    Now, what else could be cool out of this formation would be the inclusion of tebow. We could potentially play Greene*, Keller, and Tebow, three playmakers (*I'm using the term playmaker lightly here), all in the same backfield.


    So we would have those three in the backfield, with Sanchez at QB. This would be a very effective formation to run or pass out of.
    Greene, Tebow and a healthy Keller in the backfield would be a fiendish set behind Sanchez. All sorts of things could happen out of that formation.

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